Search results

1 – 10 of 130
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Mary Weir and Jim Hughes

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing…

Abstract

Introduction Consider a hi‐fi loudspeaker manufacturing company acquired on the brink of insolvency by an American multinational. The new owners discover with growing concern that the product range is obsolete, that manufacturing facilities are totally inadequate and that there is a complete absence of any real management substance or structure. They decide on the need to relocate urgently so as to provide continuity of supply at the very high — a market about to shrink at a rate unprecedented in its history.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1976

The Work Research Unit of the Department of the Employment has recently published the result of its sponsored survey of Scottish companies. It reveals a growing interest…

Abstract

The Work Research Unit of the Department of the Employment has recently published the result of its sponsored survey of Scottish companies. It reveals a growing interest in the application of job re‐design to industry and commerce in Scotland, particularly amongst the large companies. The survey was prepared by Mary Weir, a Research Fellow at the Manschester Business School, and introduces seven detailed case studies concentrated in the manufacturing sector of industry. Each study looks at the original method of work, the reasons for improving jobs, the objectives of the changes, and the ways in which they were carried out. The report emphasises that re‐designing jobs is not easily accomplished. Indeed, one of the case studies describes an attempt to introduce autonomous work groups in clothing factory and outlines the difficluties that led to its abandonment. It is underlined in the survey that while considerable scope exists in Scotland and elsewhere for improving the quality of working life, the methods used must meet individual needs and local circumtances.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Thomas M. Brown, Joseph W. Barnes, Thomas M. Brown, Josephine Fidler, Frederic Glazer, Ruth M. Jackson, James E. Justice and Richard Rekowski

Topography is a problem in West Virginia. “If you took all the mountains of West Virginia and made them flat, West Virginia would be larger than Texas” is our boast and…

Abstract

Topography is a problem in West Virginia. “If you took all the mountains of West Virginia and made them flat, West Virginia would be larger than Texas” is our boast and our network curse. Those mountains provide spectacular views, and stunning areas for our citizens who wish to maintain their independence. Those mountains and that remoteness also create difficulties in information equity, which we are just beginning to address.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1972

Enid Mumford, Dorothy Mercer, Stephen Mills and Mary Weir

This article presents a method for systematically catering for human needs when introducing computer systems. It covers the diagnosis of these needs through an examination…

Abstract

This article presents a method for systematically catering for human needs when introducing computer systems. It covers the diagnosis of these needs through an examination of the “fit” between what the firm requires of its employees and what employees are seeking from the firm. Data derived from this diagnosis is used to construct organisational profiles as an aide to planning strategy, and as a basis for socio‐technical systems design which has the objective of meeting technical and human needs at one and the same time. A method for monitoring the implementation of computer systems has been developed. This checks that the system does not deviate from its social objectives and provides a feedback system for correction. Lastly an evaluation of the success of the new system in human terms is made by examining the post‐change “fit” between organisational and individual needs.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1977

A NOTED engineer of our acquaintance started his career as an apprentice working under a foreman of Huguenot descent and who was known affectionately—well, generally!—as…

Abstract

A NOTED engineer of our acquaintance started his career as an apprentice working under a foreman of Huguenot descent and who was known affectionately—well, generally!—as Papa Poisson. He was very knowledgable and was very fond of telling his juniors how he had worked, many years previously, at Rolls‐Royce when that name really meant something.

Details

Work Study, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1976

WE have, of course, been fighting a losing battle. By now it appears that all of the three major political parties are in favour of worker participation at board level…

Abstract

WE have, of course, been fighting a losing battle. By now it appears that all of the three major political parties are in favour of worker participation at board level. Prettywell everybody is convinced that it is bound to come. So let us, too, assume that that is so and take a look at the implications.

Details

Work Study, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

L.E. Falkenberg, M.L. Monachello and L.C. Edlund

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work…

Abstract

One of the major challenges for managing human resources in the 1990s is to appropriately respond to employees having to manage the dual responsibilities of home and work (Paris, 1989). Balancing work and family has been considered a women's issue, with the question being whether women could handle both the home demands and the responsibilities of a paid job. Yet the entrance of women into the workforce has also required major role adjustments by their husbands. According to the traditional model of work, husbands prioritize work over family with the wife providing the necessary emotional and physical support to keep the husband in “good working order” (Pleck, 1977). In today's society, this model is no longer widely applicable, as men in dual earner families receive less emotional support than their single‐earner counterparts (Burke, & Weir, 1976; Keith, & Schafer, 1980) and tend to assume greater family responsibilities (Holahan, & Gilbert, 1979; Weingarten, 1978).

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1899

In a previous article we have called attention to the danger of eating tinned and bottled vegetables which have been coloured by the addition of salts of copper and we…

Abstract

In a previous article we have called attention to the danger of eating tinned and bottled vegetables which have been coloured by the addition of salts of copper and we have urged upon the public that no such preparations should be purchased without an adequate guarantee that they are free from copper compounds. Copper poisoning, however, is not the only danger to which consumers of preserved foods are liable. Judging from the reports of cases of irritant poisoning which appear with somewhat alarming frequency in the daily press, and from the information which we have been at pains to obtain, there can be no question that the occurrence of a large number of these cases is to be attributed to the ingestion of tinned foods which has been improperly prepared or kept. It is not to be supposed that the numerous cases of illness which have been ascribed to the use of tinned foods were all cases of metallic poisoning brought about by the action of the contents of the tins upon the metal and solder of the latter. The evidence available does not show that a majority of the cases could be put down to this cause alone; but it must be admitted that the evidence is in most instances of an unsatisfactory and inconclusive character. It has become a somewhat too common custom to put forward the view that so‐called “ptomaine” poisoning is the cause of the mischief; and this upon very insufficient evidence. While there is no doubt that the presence in tinned goods of some poisonous products of decomposition or organic change very frequently gives rise to dangerous illness, so little is known of the chemical nature and of the physiological effects of “ptomaines” that to obtain conclusive evidence is in all cases most difficult, and in many, if not in most, quite impossible. A study of the subject leads to the conclusion that both ptomaine poisoning and metallic poisoning—also of an obscure kind—have, either separately or in conjunction, produced the effects from time to time reported. In view of the many outbreaks of illness, and especially, of course, of the deaths which have been attributed to the eating of bad tinned foods it is of the utmost importance that some more stringent control than that which can be said to exist at present should be exercised over the preparation and sale of tinned goods. In Holland some two or three years ago, in consequence partly of the fact that, after eating tinned food, about seventy soldiers were attacked by severe illness at the Dutch manœuvres, the attention of the Government was drawn to the matter by Drs. VAN HAMEL ROOS and HARMENS, who advocated the use of enamel for coating tins. It appears that an enamel of special manufacture is now extensively used in Holland by the manfacturers of the better qualities of tinned food, and that the use of such enamelled tins is insisted upon for naval and military stores. This is a course which might with great advantage be followed in this country. While absolute safety may not be attainable, adequate steps should be taken to prevent the use of damaged, inferior or improper materials, to enforce cleanliness, and to ensure the adoption of some better system of canning.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 1 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Ahmed al Janahi and David Weir

Most studies of crisis management and business failure are based on research in western economic situations and assume western institutional patterns and attitudes. These…

Abstract

Most studies of crisis management and business failure are based on research in western economic situations and assume western institutional patterns and attitudes. These assume that certain fundamental elements of financial rationality guide the intervention of banks and financial institutions in situations of incipient business failure. This study is based on an empirical analysis of companies in the GCC region of companies which are clients of banks which operate within the frameworks of the Islamic Banking System in the Arab Middle East. A “sharp‐bending” orientation rather than a “business failure” model is used and conclusions are reached about the role of the banks and other financial institutions and their methods of managing difficult client situations. Some typical situations relating to problem loans, loan officers’ responses and behaviour and out comes are reviewed. The role of the bank in triggering early problem‐recognition is described and the response of the bank, subsequent actions and the sequence of recovery are described. Procedures and actions which would be regarded as “irrational” in a western cultural context are interpretable as “rational” within different cultural frameworks. We argue that there is no one universally‐accepted frame work of business rationality, and that “financial rationalities” are the product of deeply‐embedded cultural frames of reference.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Brian H. Kleiner

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the…

Abstract

Presents a special issue, enlisting the help of the author’s students and colleagues, focusing on age, sex, colour and disability discrimination in America. Breaks the evidence down into manageable chunks, covering: age discrimination in the workplace; discrimination against African‐Americans; sex discrimination in the workplace; same sex sexual harassment; how to investigate and prove disability discrimination; sexual harassment in the military; when the main US job‐discrimination law applies to small companies; how to investigate and prove racial discrimination; developments concerning race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; developments concerning discrimination against workers with HIV or AIDS; developments concerning discrimination based on refusal of family care leave; developments concerning discrimination against gay or lesbian employees; developments concerning discrimination based on colour; how to investigate and prove discrimination concerning based on colour; developments concerning the Equal Pay Act; using statistics in employment discrimination cases; race discrimination in the workplace; developments concerning gender discrimination in the workplace; discrimination in Japanese organizations in America; discrimination in the entertainment industry; discrimination in the utility industry; understanding and effectively managing national origin discrimination; how to investigate and prove hiring discrimination based on colour; and, finally, how to investigate sexual harassment in the workplace.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 17 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

1 – 10 of 130