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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Liz Sayce

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Mary O'Hagan

The leadership of people with lived experience of mental health problems is underdeveloped, when it comes to leadership in one's own recovery, at the service level, and at…

Abstract

The leadership of people with lived experience of mental health problems is underdeveloped, when it comes to leadership in one's own recovery, at the service level, and at the systemic level. Unlike the mental health system, the user/survivor movement has a values base of empowerment and equality. But the movement has not yet created an explicit model of leadership based on these values. Conventional models of leadership have little to offer but critiques of it provide a good framework for users and survivors to build its own model of leadership upon. If user/survivor leadership is to thrive, new roles, practices and competencies need to be developed. At a deeper level, there needs to be philosophical, psychological and political shifts in service systems if user/survivor leadership is to ever take root. Furthermore, the leadership of empowerment and equality should pervade all the leadership in service systems and beyond.

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Rachel Perkins and Julie Repper

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Jasna Russo and Diana Rose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss human rights assessment and monitoring in psychiatric institutions from the perspectives of those whose rights are at stake. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss human rights assessment and monitoring in psychiatric institutions from the perspectives of those whose rights are at stake. It explores the extent to which mental health service user/psychiatric survivor priorities can be addressed with monitoring instruments such as the WHO QualityRights Tool Kit.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the outcomes of a large-scale consultation exercise with people with personal experience of detention in psychiatric institutions across 15 European countries. The consultation took place via one focus group per country and extended to a total of 116 participants. The distinctive characteristic of this research is that it imparts an insider perspective: both the research design and the qualitative analysis of the focus group discussion transcripts were done by a social researcher who shared the identity of service user/survivor with the participants.

Findings

The paper highlights human rights issues which are not readily visible and therefore less likely to be captured in institutional monitoring visits. Key issues include the lack of interaction and general humanity of staff, receipt of unhelpful treatment, widespread reliance on psychotropic drugs as the sole treatment and the overall impact of psychiatric experience on a person's biography.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the way participants were recruited, the research findings do not offer a representative picture of the human rights situation in particular countries. They point clearly, however, to new directions for human rights research in the psychiatric context.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the indispensability of experiential knowledge for not only securing and improving but also extending the understanding of human rights standards in psychiatry.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Peter McGeorge

The aim of the paper is to describe the “organisational lifecycle” of the New Zealand Mental Health Commission (NZ MHC) including factors that led to it being established…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to describe the “organisational lifecycle” of the New Zealand Mental Health Commission (NZ MHC) including factors that led to it being established, the evolving phases of the work it undertook and its key achievements, the critical success factors, the rationale behind its disestablishment and transfer of its core functions to another entity.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is a review of relevant documents and interviews of previous Commissioners, and insights of the final two Chair Commissioners and authors.

Findings

The NZ MHC was established to provide government with independent advice on how to develop the capacity and capability of mental health and addictions services for those people with the highest and most complex needs, estimated to be approximately 3 percent of the population. Having successfully led changes to achieve this goal as set out in The Blueprint of 1998 it is now influencing government policy and services to achieve better mental health and well‐being for the whole population as per Blueprint II, published in 2012. The NZ Government clearly values the role of Mental Health Commissioner which has been transferred to the Office of the Health and Disability Commissioner from July 2012 at the time the Commission is disestablished.

Research limitations/implications

The paper relies on insights of those in Commission leadership roles.

Practical implications

Other Commissions may gain insight into their own evolutionary pathways and proactively manage them.

Social implications

Optimal mental health and wellbeing for society requires policy that simultaneously takes a “whole of society” approach and focuses on responding to people with the highest needs.

Originality/value

The paper shows that there are significant concerns about the disestablishment of the Mental Health Commission in New Zealand and little understanding of the underlying rationale for the organisational changes.

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Rachel Perkins and Julie Repper

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193

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Rachel Perkins and Julie Repper

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455

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Rachel Perkins and Julie Repper

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344

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Mark Davison and Steve Onyett

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International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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