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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Rob Law and Mary Lau

Traditionally, the hotel industry has prided itself on its provision of quality service and therefore guest satisfaction. Unfortunately, hotel managers are often…

Abstract

Traditionally, the hotel industry has prided itself on its provision of quality service and therefore guest satisfaction. Unfortunately, hotel managers are often reluctant, or even resistant, to accept technologies, fearing that technologies might change their ability to provide hotel guests with the personal attention that characterizes a typical hotel business. Hotel managers’ low technical competence, and the wide adoption of technology‐assisted hotel operations, mean that the hotel industry remains at high risk regarding information technology (IT) problems. This paper reports on a study that investigates the Y2K readiness in various departments of the Kowloon Hotel. Based on the Kowloon Hotel’s experience, this paper serves to inform hotel managers that: most, if not all, hotels are at risk of future IT problems; the cost of a hotel for ignoring these problems could be huge, and most importantly; the problems’ influences will be timeless. That is, IT problems could have a long‐lasting impact on the entire hotel industry. Research findings of this paper should be of interest to hoteliers to better understand the impact of IT applications in the year 2000 and beyond.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Agnes Lau and Mary Pang

This study investigates the significance of developing career goals and adopting appropriate career strategies during the first two years of employment after graduation…

Abstract

This study investigates the significance of developing career goals and adopting appropriate career strategies during the first two years of employment after graduation. Data were collected from a sample of 300 graduate employees in Hong Kong during a time when job competition has been increasingly tough. Results indicate that respondents tend to use strategies such as “enhancing promotability” (performing effectively, acquiring skills, building networks) and “improving image with superiors” (conforming to expectations, highlighting accomplishments) more frequently than “establishing external contacts” (joining professional bodies and trade associations) during early career. The relationships of career goals and strategies to satisfaction with salary and hierarchical progression are also examined. Factors such as “developing career goals and plans” and “improving image with superiors” are positively and significantly related to satisfaction with progression. Practical implications of the study findings on individuals and organizations are discussed.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2017

Mary Vigier and Helen Spencer-Oatey

The purpose of this paper is to explore how newly formed culturally diverse project teams develop and implement rules, and how these processes may be affected by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how newly formed culturally diverse project teams develop and implement rules, and how these processes may be affected by language-fluency asymmetries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case-study research design, the authors investigated three multicultural project teams within a management integration program in a multinational company in France. Their complete data set includes 37.5 hours of observations and 49 hours of semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Findings revealed that subgroups formed on the basis of language-fluency and this affected the development and implementation of rules. While rule-setting mechanisms emerged across teams, they varied in form. On the one hand, tightly structured rules emerged and rules were rigidly applied when there were greater language inequalities. In contrast, implicit behavior controls guided interactions when language-fluency subgroupings were less salient. The findings also revealed that the alignment of other individual attributes with language fluency reinforced subgroup divisions, further impacting the rule development and implementation processes.

Practical implications

Understanding rule development and implementation in culturally diverse teams and how these processes are impacted by language disparities enables managers to help members develop more successful behavioral patterns by keeping language-fluency (and other) attributes in mind.

Originality/value

The study extends and complements previous team research by providing in-depth insights into the process of rule development and implementation. It demonstrates the impact of language-fluency asymmetries and subgroup dynamics on these processes. The authors propose a model to capture the processes by which culturally diverse teams create rules, and how the rule-setting mechanisms might be moderated by faultlines such as language-based disparities.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 17 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

James U. McNeal, Neil C. Herndon and Chyon‐Hwa Yeh

Reports on two studies conducted in Hong Kong, one in 1989, the other in 1994, to see if children’s socialization as consumers has changed in the intervening years…

Abstract

Reports on two studies conducted in Hong Kong, one in 1989, the other in 1994, to see if children’s socialization as consumers has changed in the intervening years. Formulates hypotheses, based on the earlier research, that children will receive spending money by the time they are four, that the amount will increase as they get older, children will spend money by the age of four, they will also save money, older children will visit more shops than younger children, and children will go shopping without parents by the age of four. Outlines the research methodology used – 318 questionnaires used for analysis, composition of the sample of respondents, demographics – and records how analysis of variance was used to make comparisons with data from the earlier study. Considers income, spending and saving attitudes in children, as well as how they spend and what they buy. Finds that, in 1994 (compared to 1989) children aged 6, 9, 10, 11 and 12 receive more money; 4, 7 and 10 year olds spend a higher percent of their income, saving has decreased for 4, 7 and 10 year olds, children’s real income has doubled since 1989, independent shopping trips seem to have been postponed until the child is 6 but co‐shopping with parents has increased for all ages; most shopping trips without parents focused on food stores and street vendors that were easily accessible from home, but purchasing behaviour has not changed significantly. Indicates that Hong Kong children are pursuing a western (US) model of spending income, rather than the Chinese model of saving, and that children are undergoing consumer socialization and consumer education – as evidenced by the single fact that in 1994 $161.8 million was spent in Hong Kong by children aged 4‐12.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Adesuwa Omorede

This paper aims to explore the reasons behind individuals’ motivational drivers to start social enterprises in Nigeria and their persistence in the entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the reasons behind individuals’ motivational drivers to start social enterprises in Nigeria and their persistence in the entrepreneurial process. By presenting an emergent model, the paper aims to provide more understanding on why certain individuals devote their efforts in addressing nagging issues and tackling longstanding inefficiencies in communities and societies.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive study, which draws upon qualitative data (interviews and archival data) of social entrepreneurs and people surrounding them, was conducted.

Findings

The findings show that local conditions such as widespread ignorance and unscientific beliefs together with the individual’s intentional mindset are contributing factors, which explain engagement in starting a social enterprise. It is further suggested that the combination of local conditions and intentional mindset, in turn, triggers the individuals’ passion for a cause that is facilitated by the support provided from their social network, which both seem to be important for maintaining persistence in the oftentimes challenging situation of being a social entrepreneur.

Originality/value

This study makes two significant contributions to the literature of social entrepreneurship. First, the study presents an emergent model that introduces specific empirically grounded reasons toward individuals’ drives and motives for starting and persisting in social entrepreneurship. Second, the study adds to the development of literature by highlighting the importance of contextual factors when studying social entrepreneurship and also provides explanations for the significant role of passion for social entrepreneurial activities.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2013

Samantha N. N. Cross and Mary C. Gilly

This research examines the impact of biculturalism on the decision making, identity perceptions, and consumption patterns of children of parents from different countries…

Abstract

Purpose

This research examines the impact of biculturalism on the decision making, identity perceptions, and consumption patterns of children of parents from different countries of origin and different cultural and ethnic backgrounds (i.e., biculturals from birth).

Methodology

This research uses semi-structured depth interviews with the adult children of binational households. We use our Cross Ball and Jar (CBJ) projective technique, which utilizes a tactile, hands-on sorting and ranking process to facilitate discussion of the multifaceted identities and cultural affiliations of bicultural consumers.

Findings

Our findings reveal that these “true” biculturals, growing up within a bicultural and binational home, have a more fluid, less clear-cut perception of their identity. Four emergent themes are examined: “Openness,” “Splitness,” “Outside the Mainstream,” and “Badge of Honor.”

Research implications

Based on these findings, the complexity of identity perceptions is revealed. Participants’ discussion of their struggles to fit in adds to our efforts to better understand multiculturalism’s impact, an understanding facilitated by the use of our CBJ projective technique.

Originality/value of chapter

This study raises awareness about the consumption behavior of multicultural consumers and their ongoing interaction with mainstream society. Second, our research extends the current literature on multiculturalism and biculturalism, by focusing on this particular type of bicultural consumer. Finally, this research tests the innovative CBJ projective technique, as a simple and flexible interactive tool to assist researchers in exploring complex, multifaceted identities.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Richard A.E. North, Jim P. Duguid and Michael A. Sheard

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative…

Abstract

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative consumer ‐ the egg producing industry ‐ adopting “egg associated” outbreak investigation reports as the reference output. Defines and makes use of four primary performance indicators: accessibility of information; completeness of evidence supplied in food‐poisoning outbreak investigation reports as to the sources of infection in “egg‐associated” outbreaks; timeliness of information published; and utility of information and advice aimed at preventing or controlling food poisoning. Finds that quality expectations in each parameter measured are not met. Examines reasons why surveillance agencies have not delivered the quality demanded. Makes use of detailed case studies to illustrate inadequacies of current practice. Attributes failure to deliver “accessibility” to a lack of recognition on the status or nature of “consumers”, combined with a self‐maintenance motivation of the part of the surveillance agencies. Finds that failures to deliver “completeness” and “utility” may result from the same defects which give rise to the lack of “accessibility” in that, failing to recognize the consumers of a public service for what they are, the agencies feel no need to provide them with the data they require. The research indicates that self‐maintenance by scientific epidemiologists may introduce biases which when combined with a politically inspired need to transfer responsibility for food‐poisoning outbreaks, skew the conduct of investigations and their conclusions. Contends that this is compounded by serious and multiple inadequacies in the conduct of investigations, arising at least in part from the lack of training and relative inexperience of investigators, the whole conditioned by interdisciplinary rivalry between the professional groups staffing the different agencies. Finds that in addition failures to exploit or develop epidemiological technologies has affected the ability of investigators to resolve the uncertainties identified. Makes recommendations directed at improving the performance of the surveillance agencies which, if adopted will substantially enhance food poisoning control efforts.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2015

Fion Lau and Adam M. Williams

Research on the impact of oneʼs self-perception of voice on their willingness to take part in organizations collaboration has recently been empirically demonstrated…

Abstract

Research on the impact of oneʼs self-perception of voice on their willingness to take part in organizations collaboration has recently been empirically demonstrated. However, in the context of larger, global organizations, research has yet to determine the importance of voice and collaboration. Moreover, the failure to account for influences such as globalization warrants revisiting theoretical explanations of voice and collaboration. This manuscript proposes a new model merging cultural theory and the work on voice and collaboration to describe how global organizations seek to develop a structure and attract personnel that will collaborate to make decisions towards the organizationʼs preferred outcome and ensuing behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Vincent K. Chong, Michele K. C. Leong and David R. Woodliff

This paper uses a laboratory experiment to examine the effect of accountability pressure as a monitoring control tool to mitigate subordinates' propensity to create…

Abstract

This paper uses a laboratory experiment to examine the effect of accountability pressure as a monitoring control tool to mitigate subordinates' propensity to create budgetary slack. The results suggest that budgetary slack is (lowest) highest when accountability pressure is (present) absent under a private information situation. The results further reveal that accountability pressure is positively associated with subordinates' perceived levels of honesty, which in turn is negatively associated with budgetary slack creation. The findings of this paper have important theoretical and practical implications for budgetary control systems design.

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