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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Andrew Martel, Kirsten Day, Mary Ann Jackson and Saumya Kaushik

The COVID-19 pandemic has engendered changes in previously unimaginable timeframes, leading to new ways of working, which can quickly become the “ordinary” way of working…

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Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has engendered changes in previously unimaginable timeframes, leading to new ways of working, which can quickly become the “ordinary” way of working. Many traditional workplace and educational practices and environments, however, are disadvantageous to people with disability and consequently are under-represented in the workforce and higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Contributing factors include exclusionary societal and employer attitudes and inaccessible built environments including lack of attention to paths of travel, amenities, acoustics, lighting and temperature. Social exclusion resulting from lack of access to meaningful work is also problematic. COVID-19 has accelerated the incidence of working and studying from home, but the home environment of many people with disability may not be suitable in terms of space, privacy, technology access and connection to the wider community.

Findings

However, remote and flexible working arrangements may hold opportunities for enhancing work participation of people with disabilities. Instigating systemic conditions that will empower people with disability to take full advantage of ordinary working trajectories is key. As the current global experiment in modified work and study practices has shown, structural, organisational and design norms need to change. The future of work and study is almost certainly more work and study from home. An expanded understanding of people with disabilities lived experience of the built environment encompassing opportunities for work, study and socialisation from home and the neighbourhood would more closely align with the UNCRPD's emphasis on full citizenship.

Originality/value

This paper examines what is currently missing in the development of a distributed work and study place continuum that includes traditional workplaces and campuses, local neighbourhood hubs and homes.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Maurice B. Line, Elda‐Monica Guerrero, Mary E. Jackson, Niels Mark, Henri Sène and Leo Waaijers

Several members of this journal’s editorial advisory board give brief views on how they see the future of interlending and document supply. The article concludes with an…

965

Abstract

Several members of this journal’s editorial advisory board give brief views on how they see the future of interlending and document supply. The article concludes with an overview of these contributions, together with additional comments by an editorial board member

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Mary E. Jackson

The AAU/ARL (Association of American Universities/Association of Research Libraries) Japan Journal Access Project seeks to expand access to research materials published in…

Abstract

The AAU/ARL (Association of American Universities/Association of Research Libraries) Japan Journal Access Project seeks to expand access to research materials published in Japan, and to coordinate collection development activities of Japanese‐language material held by North American research libraries. Established in 1994, the focus of the Japan Project has evolved from providing access to scientific and technical serials published in Japan to providing access to Japanese language materials held by Japanese and North American libraries. The Union List of Japanese Serials and Newspapers and the Association of National University Libraries (ANUL) and Waseda document‐delivery projects have emerged as key activities. Collaborative collection development remains an important, but unrealized, goal. Suggestions for future developments are made.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Mary E. Jackson

The Global Resources Program (GRP) seeks to improve access to international research materials through cooperative structures and the use of new technology. GRP, a joint…

Abstract

The Global Resources Program (GRP) seeks to improve access to international research materials through cooperative structures and the use of new technology. GRP, a joint initiative of the Association of American Universities (AAU) and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) has launched six projects to test varying models of access. The six projects are in different stages of development and have different levels of North American and international participation. All projects share common challenges and potential barriers. This paper reviews these challenges and barriers and suggests strategies to overcome them. The realization that North American research libraries are no longer able to collect comprehensively provides an opportunity for the global interlibrary loan and document supply community to provide access to and delivery of materials needed by scholars and researchers, regardless of location of the material or the scholar.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

36

Abstract

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Mike McGrath

The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature concerning document supply and related matters.

630

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature concerning document supply and related matters.

Design/methodology/approach

Includes the reading of over 140 published works, including journals, monographs, reports and web sites.

Findings

Finds that open access is moving from debate to reality, that debate continues about the future of scholarly communication and there is growing hostility to big deals.

Originality/value

Provides a useful source of information for librarians and others interested in document supply and related matters.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Margaret Barwick

Discusses the importance of standards in interlending. Describessome attempts to improve access to publications. Highlights ventures incommercial document delivery and…

Abstract

Discusses the importance of standards in interlending. Describes some attempts to improve access to publications. Highlights ventures in commercial document delivery and also conflicts between electronic publishing and copyright. Gives details of interlending activities in the audiovisual field and at a national level. Summarizes some surveys on interlending. Describes developments in academic libraries as well as views on resource sharing, advances in electronic document delivery and networking, along with forecasts for the future.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Mike McGrath

253

Abstract

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2011

Don Ross

Purpose – To review the significance of Hayek's argument, in The Sensory Order, from a connectionist theory of mental architecture to descriptive and normative…

Abstract

Purpose – To review the significance of Hayek's argument, in The Sensory Order, from a connectionist theory of mental architecture to descriptive and normative individualism.

Methodology/approach – The chapter reconstructs Hayek's argument, then replaces Hayek's premises about mental architecture with premises derived from the recent neuroscience of reward and consumption, and then explains why the argument no longer goes through.

Findings – Hayek's abstract mental architecture was closer to adequacy than most subsequent competing alternatives produced by philosophers. His argument from this architecture to individualism is valid. However, we must now supplement the abstract architecture with complexities drawn from recent neuroscience. These show the argument to be unsound. However, if commitment to descriptive individualism is abandoned, then a new argument from psychological premises to normative individualism is available.

Social implications – There is a good argument from psychological premises to normative individualism; but normative individualists should not try to defend their position by resting it on the supposed truth of descriptive individualism.

Originality/value – All the main arguments of the chapter are new to the literature.

Details

Hayek in Mind: Hayek's Philosophical Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-399-6

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