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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Carl O. DiNardo and Mary J. Snyder Broussard

This paper aims to demonstrate how commercially available tabletop games can be effective tools to teach information literacy and present a list of best practices to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how commercially available tabletop games can be effective tools to teach information literacy and present a list of best practices to improve instructor’s chances of success with this pedagogical method.

Design/methodology/approach

Librarians from two separate institutions with complementary experiences analyze the theory of game-based learning with tabletop games, present an example of game-based information literacy instruction in practice and suggest four best practices for this method of instruction.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that educators by combining sound pedagogical practices to connect the educational content to what rules of games ask of students can effectively find a balance between enthusiastic engagement and higher-order information literacy learning outcomes.

Practical implications

This paper can be used to guide librarians looking for creative and sound methods to engage students using tabletop games to teach information literacy.

Originality/value

The authors have unique theoretical and practical knowledge with joining pedagogy and tabletop games in the information literacy classroom. While there is a lot of literature on games in academic libraries, there is only one other paper on using a commercially available tabletop game to teach information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Mary J. Snyder Broussard

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of available online library games and offer six suggestions for best practices based on the available games.

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3835

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of available online library games and offer six suggestions for best practices based on the available games.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a thorough review of the literature on online games in libraries as well as an analysis of the games freely available online. Further information from some game designers was sought by e‐mail as needed to enhance the published literature.

Findings

A total of 17 online library games have been mentioned in the literature, 11 of which are at least partially available online. They vary greatly in type of game, technical sophistication, cost of development, and visual appeal. Some have been successful (designers report being satisfied), some have been less successful, and some have been abandoned before completion. Suggestions for development of future games include keeping it simple; having a plan to use it in class or market to faculty; “gating” key concepts; making it fun; giving feedback; and play testing throughout the development process.

Originality/value

While previous articles have mentioned three or four online games in libraries, no one has attempted to make a comprehensive overview or to suggest similarities among what has worked well in these projects. Analyzing the key traits of the more successful games will help librarians develop games in the future.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Andrew Kearns, Breanne A. Kirsch and Virginia Cononie

This paper aims to describe a successful outreach to transfer students through an interactive information literacy game. While the main purpose of the game is to introduce…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a successful outreach to transfer students through an interactive information literacy game. While the main purpose of the game is to introduce students to research and university library resources, it also allows for an analysis of incoming students’ information literacy skills.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study outlines the evolution of the game from a test-like tutorial administered through the Blackboard course management system to an interactive game in two iterations, describing the game in relation to game design and best practices and discussing how the artwork for the game was created. An analysis of data from student answers to the game questions over time shows what librarians have learned about the information literacy skills of incoming transfer students. Finally, student feedback about the game collected through a survey is presented along with ideas for future modifications.

Findings

This paper provides insights into the design and creation process of an interactive information literacy game and a model for how similar games can help librarians assess students’ information literacy skills.

Practical implications

Transfer students are hard to reach as a group at many institutions. An interactive game targeted to transfers during the admissions process is a potentially effective way to reach out to them.

Originality/value

This paper brings together two important issues in the library literature: how to reach out to transfer students and educational library games. Librarians involved with these issues will benefit from the paper’s insights and practical advice.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

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113

Abstract

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2020

Tessa Withorn, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Anthony Andora, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Maggie Clarke, George Martinez, Amalia Castañeda, Aric Haas and Wendolyn Vermeer

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

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6794

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2019.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 370 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Lisa Martin and Will Martin

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how to use a web-based library game as an outreach tool at events. Games in higher education are a trend that libraries have used…

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1016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how to use a web-based library game as an outreach tool at events. Games in higher education are a trend that libraries have used for information literacy but less frequently for outreach. Although there are relatively few examples of the use of games in academic library outreach events, games have the potential to be excellent outreach tools by engaging students and presenting them with the opportunity to change their perceptions of the library.

Design/methodology/approach

The University of North Dakota (UND) Libraries successfully connected with students at an outreach event by using a modified version of the Information Literacy Game originally developed by the University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNCG). UND Librarians created specific technical modifications and an event workflow, highlighted here, that other academic libraries can adapt for use at outreach events to attract both students who are and those who are not typically users of the library.

Findings

The information literacy game, with some specific technical changes, is customizable in relatively inexpensive ways that allow librarians from institutions of all sizes to engage students with a game at outreach events.

Originality/value

Games, especially Web-based games, have not previously been used in outreach events. The literature on the use of games in information literacy sessions but outreach is an even more logical fit for gaming. This paper presents a practical, value-oriented method for academic libraries to modify an information literacy game for use in outreach.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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