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1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

Stephen Abbott, Julie Attenborough, Annie Cushing, Mary Hanrahan and Ania Korszun

Medical and nursing students are often anxious about communicating with patients with mental health problems, even when they have received general communication skills…

Abstract

Medical and nursing students are often anxious about communicating with patients with mental health problems, even when they have received general communication skills training. Communication is particularly challenging when patients are compulsorily admitted to hospital. The study reported here sought to explore medical and nursing students' attitudes to this challenge, stimulated by watching a DVD illustrating professional‐patient communications in this situation. Facilitated discussions of the DVD were recorded and the transcripts were thematically analysed. A strong commitment to three underlying principles of patient‐centred care emerged.1. A preference for egalitarian over authoritarian relationships between patients and professionals.2. A preference for empathetic over bureaucratic approaches to patients.3. Respect for patients as autonomous beings.Students seemed less aware of the need for clear and effective communication of information, and some appear confused about patient‐professional boundaries.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Mary Crabtree Tonges and T.K. Das

Accelerating environmental turbulence in the health care industry has led to a significant interest in strategic management and work redesign. This paper examines…

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Abstract

Accelerating environmental turbulence in the health care industry has led to a significant interest in strategic management and work redesign. This paper examines different types of generic hospital strategies and alternative approaches to work redesign, and proposes a contingency framework consisting of these two important organizational elements for improved hospital effectiveness.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Abstract

Details

Protest Technologies and Media Revolutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-647-4

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2016

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in the Study of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-651-9

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Dana Davis, Mary Hawk, Jamie McLaughlin, Terri Brincko, Miranda King and Christina Farmartino

– The purpose of this paper is to explore unstably housed persons satisfaction with representative payee services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore unstably housed persons satisfaction with representative payee services.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were distributed through two different methods, which consisted of mailings and dispersal by program staff members.

Findings

Participants overwhelmingly reported that they were satisfied with representative payee services with 77 percent of the stand-alone housing participants and 86 percent of the scattered site participants reported being “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with representative payee services. Similarly, 92 percent of stand-alone participants and 82 percent of scattered site participants reported being satisfied with their abilities to care for their needs. The lowest reported satisfaction with the program was with the timeliness of getting spending checks, with 85 percent of participants being satisfied in the stand-alone location and only 63 percent of participants reporting satisfaction in the scattered site setting.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited by the fact that it is an evaluation of one program and does not have a comparison group. Additionally, clients self-selected to participate in the research and results are not generalizable. Future research should ascertain whether aspects of harm reduction and peer staff have an impact on client outcomes as well as representative payee satisfaction. The study was conducted in a metropolitan area in the Northeast USA, which includes the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and surrounding areas. Given that this region includes both city and suburban areas, it is likely the results are translatable to multiple geographic areas.

Practical implications

Results of this research indicate that use of harm reduction and peer staff could be factors in client satisfaction with representative payee services thereby increasing the possibility that clients will sign up for this service and receive the benefits of the program.

Social implications

Having a representative payee program imposed on clients whether voluntarily or involuntarily can be an extremely anxiety provoking experience. Increasing satisfaction with this service will lend to improved quality of life for clients as well as improved relationships with providers which may lead to more engagement in care.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new perspective on representative payee programs since it shows positive satisfaction, as well as use of harm reduction and peer staff, which varies from previous studies.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2002

Abstract

Details

Critical Theory: Diverse Objects, Diverse Subjects
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-963-4

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Eileen Byrne

The author focuses on one occupational area—mining—and suggests some implications of the available evidence of women's entry to this male bastion of work and power in…

Abstract

The author focuses on one occupational area—mining—and suggests some implications of the available evidence of women's entry to this male bastion of work and power in society. Two key areas are: the need to enforce national standards in the labour market to remove discrimination against admitting women to “male” occupations and the development of positive‐discriminatory training for women currently under‐represented in or barred from a male‐dominated employment sector.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Lucy Meredith, Roger John Lewis and Mary Haslum

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Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Mary-Rose McLaren

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the interrelation of form and meaning in arts-based research and in academic writing.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interrelation of form and meaning in arts-based research and in academic writing.

Design/methodology/approach

It draws on two arts-based projects: one a study of Shakespeare undertaken with undergraduate students; the other a play written to convey a young boy's experiences of Second world War in an Australian country town. Both projects were arts-based research, aimed at extending knowledge of individual experiences, and the ways in which individuals bring knowledge and interpretation to their worlds.

Findings

It is hoped by examining the experiences of individuals the authors also learn about collective experiences and ways of building and communicating understanding. The paper proposes that intuitive ways of knowing are of equal value to other ways of knowing, and the Arts provide a space where intuition can be valued and explored.

Originality/value

The paper is also an experiment in form, seeking to find forms which reflect the nature of the research. Consequently it is constructed primarily from a piece of iambic pentameter, a play script and a sonnet. These three forms are used, in conjunction, to reflect upon and explore the nature of arts-based research for individuals and collectively.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Salvador Barragan, Mariana I. Paludi and Albert Mills

The purpose of this paper is to focus on top women managers who act as change agents in the machista culture of Mexico. Specifically, the authors centre the attention not…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on top women managers who act as change agents in the machista culture of Mexico. Specifically, the authors centre the attention not only on the strategies performed by these change agents to reduce inequality, but also on understanding the way in which they discursively reproduce or challenge essentialist notions of gender with respect to the cultural and organizational context.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 top women managers in Mexico who are actively involved as change agents. A feminist poststructuralist methodological framework using critical discourse analysis was used to uncover competing notions of gender and related strategies developed to promote gender equality.

Findings

The analysis reveals that the 12 change agents perform strategies for inclusion, and only half of them engage in strategies for re-evaluation. The authors were unable to recognize whether these change agents are engaged in strategies of transformation. These change agents also reproduce and challenge “essentialist” notions of gender. In some instances – based on their own career experiences and gendered identities – they (un)consciously have adopted essentialism to fit into the cultural context of machista society. They also challenge the gender binary to eradicate essentialist notions of gender that created gender inequalities in the first place.

Research limitations/implications

The experience of these 12 top women managers may not represent the voice of other women and their careers. Ultimately, intersections with class, organizational level, nationality, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation must be taken into account so to represent other women’s particular interests with respect to equality.

Practical implications

For those researchers-consultants who may be involved in an intervention strategy, it is important to focus on helping the change agents in reviewing and reflecting on their own “vision of gender equity”. During the strategic activities of mentoring and training, these change agents could potentially “leak” a particular “vision of gender” to other women and men. Thus, part of the intervention strategy should target the change agent’s self-reflection to influence her capacity to act as change agents.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the literature on change agents and interventions for gender equality. Intervention strategies usually centre on essentialist notions of gender. The study offers potential explanations for this approach by paying attention to the process of how change agents, in their efforts to promote gender equality, may be unconsciously projecting their own identities onto others and/or consciously engaging in strategic essentialism to fit into the machista context of Mexico.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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