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Article

Ortrun Zuber‐Skerritt and Mary Farquhar

This paper is an edited version of an interview that presents information and insight into the background of ALARPM (action learning, action research and process…

Abstract

This paper is an edited version of an interview that presents information and insight into the background of ALARPM (action learning, action research and process management) not only as a field but also as a worldwide network association, thus facilitating understanding of the evolution and nature of these three concepts. The interviewee’s responses reflect her personal perspective, informed by both life experience and a theoretical framework that conceives of ALARPM first as a philosophy, a theory of learning and a methodology, and second as a method and technique.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article

Hindy Lauer Schachter

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the approach of Frederick Winslow Taylor and an early shop management proponent and Harvard Business School instructor, Henry…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the approach of Frederick Winslow Taylor and an early shop management proponent and Harvard Business School instructor, Henry Hallowell Farquhar, to how management education should connect to business practice. Such analysis has implications both for understanding the philosophical underpinnings of Taylor’s work on shop management and for important dilemmas facing contemporary management curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involves analyzing published and unpublished historical sources including books, articles, letters, memoranda, syllabi and other items on shop management education from Taylor, Farquhar and other Progressive Era educators.

Findings

The paper provides evidence that Taylor and some early shop management supporters had strong concerns about whether university management programs would help graduates succeed under actual working conditions. The evidence shows that Taylor and Farquhar believed that effective management education required students to have actual plant experience and contact with practicing managers. The interest in educational links to practice related at least in part to whether programs could install proper character in their students. The concern with manager disposition and attitudes related to a contemporary re-evaluation of Taylorism because it shows a humanist tendency to shop management thought that much literature on Taylor neglects.

Originality/value

The analysis uses a wide variety of published and unpublished sources. It discusses early use of shop management insights in engineering and business programs which are generally analyzed in separate literatures. The discussion focuses attention on the need for contemporary management programs to expand opportunities for practitioner participation in educational development.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article

Stephen A. Woods, Nick Diprose, Mary Murphy-Diprose and Geoff Thomas

This paper reviews literature on interim leadership and management through the lens of effective interim performance. The purpose of this review is to advance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews literature on interim leadership and management through the lens of effective interim performance. The purpose of this review is to advance understanding of interim assignment performance and the antecedent individual psychological characteristics of effective interim leaders and managers, to improve the practice of managing interim leaders from a human resources (HR) perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports a targeted review of the literature on interim leadership and management.

Findings

The main proposition from this review is that the influence of individual factors on interim performance operates within the stages and contexts of assignments. Accordingly, the authors propose a framework of the demands on interim assignments (the interim assignment cycle), comprising stages of preparation, entry, delivery and exit. The paper subsequently reviews evidence of the potential individual characteristics (focussing on individual differences in personality, leadership approach, motivation and competencies) of effective preparation and entry to an assignment, actions and performance during an assignment and exit/disengagement.

Practical implications

The findings of the review have implications for the selection and placement of interims into organizations and their management once appointed.

Originality/value

The main original contribution of the paper is to provide a framework around which interim assignments can be modelled and better understood. The paper discusses implications for future research, theory and human resource management practice and calls for a renewed research effort in this critical area of management and leadership.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article

G. Farquhar

The Defence Research Information Centre, or DRIC as it is commonly known, is the MOD's central deposit and dissemination point for defence scientific and technical…

Abstract

The Defence Research Information Centre, or DRIC as it is commonly known, is the MOD's central deposit and dissemination point for defence scientific and technical literature to the UK and overseas Defence Community. In March 1986 it moved from St Mary Cray to central Glasgow, where it is now located along with a number of other MOD branches in a modern office block. It was formed in October 1971 by the merger of the defence component of the Technology Reports Centre (TRC) with the Naval Scientific and Technical Information Centre (NSTIC). DRIC is part of the Procurement Executive of the Ministry of Defence. In order to discharge its remit DRIC is organised into 2 groups. Mr M.R.C. Wilkinson is the head of DRIC—he reports to the Director Establishments and Research (B)—DER(B) who in turn reports to Deputy Controller Research [DC(R)]

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article

Esther Fitzpatrick and Sandy Farquhar

The purpose of this paper is to use duoethnography to explore experiences of service as work in the university, an institution increasingly shaped by neoliberal values…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use duoethnography to explore experiences of service as work in the university, an institution increasingly shaped by neoliberal values. The authors trace the shift in emphasis within the university from one of a care-oriented form of service to a highly managerial form of service. The authors first interrogate childhood stories to make sense of the initial response to the role of service in a lecturer position, and then to the increasing organisational demand for leadership within the university.

Design/methodology/approach

As two women academics the authors see the work in teacher education as a particular form of service—as “our calling”.

Findings

This duoethnography reveals different histories in relation to service, but similar ways of thinking about the changing nature of service in the university. With particular regard to women in the academy, it reveals the desire for a more transformative approach, recognising the importance of collegial relationships, and valuing an ethics of care, in order to develop inclusive and transformative service and leadership in the academy.

Practical implications

This paper provides clear links to how changes in the university are understood and approached differently by people.

Originality/value

This paper argues for the importance of autoethnographic and duoethnographic explorations of the personal stories in the university to better understand wider definitions of service and leadership.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Abstract

Details

Investing in Health: The Social and Economic Benefits of Health Care Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-070-8

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Book part

Mary Cifaldi

The most significant predictor for health care utilization is the individual's health status. Other factors shown to affect Medicare recipient's use of health care…

Abstract

The most significant predictor for health care utilization is the individual's health status. Other factors shown to affect Medicare recipient's use of health care services are income, education, insurance, age, smoking status, place of residence, and having an ongoing relationship with a physician. Less is known about the demographic and socioeconomic factors that affect prescription drug use. Analogously to medical utilization, health status had been determined to be a significant predictor for prescription drug use. Prescription drug insurance has also been shown to increase pharmacy utilization, but its impact on overall health care costs has yet to be determined.

Details

Investing in Health: The Social and Economic Benefits of Health Care Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-070-8

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Article

Betül Çal and Mary Lambkin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of stock exchange-related brand equity on intention to invest and the mediating role of perceived risk (PR) in this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of stock exchange-related brand equity on intention to invest and the mediating role of perceived risk (PR) in this relationship in a comparative analysis between a developed and a developing market.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is carried out through an online survey among financially literate adults in two countries, Turkey and Ireland. Structural equation modeling is used to empirically test the relationships between brand equity dimensions and intention to invest, with a mediating role of PR.

Findings

The results indicate that the brand equity of a stock exchange is a relevant construct that significantly influences intention to invest. Also, the mediating role of PR is found to be strong in a developing market such as Turkey, but weak in a developed market like Ireland.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this paper is its inclusion of individual investors as the unit of analysis while leaving out institutional ones. The second limitation is the difficulty in generalizing the results to overall country populations.

Practical implications

This paper offers managerial implications regarding the need for emphasizing “stock exchange brand,” besides corporate brands traded, and customizing the management of brand-related influencers in investment decisions according to country context.

Originality/value

The impact of corporate brands in investment choices has been demonstrated before, but the influence of intermediaries – stock exchanges – through which investments are transacted, has not yet been investigated. This study addresses this gap, and further shows the differing extent of PR in this relationship between a developed and a developing country setting.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article

Aspasia Pastra, Dimitrios N. Koufopoulos, Nikola Samac and Tafsir Johansson

This study aims to understand the relationship between behavioral integration in the boardroom and board performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the relationship between behavioral integration in the boardroom and board performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a series of multiple hierarchical regression analyses to explore research questions. Primary data were collected via questionnaires from 184 Nordic members to identify perceptions of behavioral integration and board performance in their boardroom.

Findings

The authors found that different dimensions of behavioral integration have a different effect on board performance. The collaborative behavior of the board did not predict any dimension of board performance, whereas information exchange predicted one dimension of board performance, that of providing strategic leadership. The paramount role of joint decision-making is underlined in this study as this positively predicted all of the dimensions of board performance (strategic leadership, networking and readiness of the board).

Research limitations/implications

Future research should investigate behavioral integration among board members using a longitudinal design and expand the sample cross-culturally.

Practical implications

For forming high-performing teams, emphasis should be given on the joint decision-making. Understanding the joint problems, transparency in actions and discussion about the problem under consideration are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of the team.

Social implications

Team’s conversational environment has crucial impact on team outcomes.

Originality/value

This is one of the rare studies that examine perceptions of executives about the level of behavioral integration in their board.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Book part

Thomas J. Calo and Frank Shipper

The purpose of this research was to investigate a successful company, Atlas Container Corporation, that practices the values of egalitarianism, democracy, mutuality, and…

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to investigate a successful company, Atlas Container Corporation, that practices the values of egalitarianism, democracy, mutuality, and transparency. Moreover, this research sought to identify the human resource policies and practices (HRPP) used to reinforce these values and create a distinctive culture.

An ethnographic approach was used to produce a case study. Interviews, observations, archives, and documents were all part of the collected data.

The HRPP were distinctively different from the normal practices in the industry. Thus, these differences appeared to explain its success.

While this case study focused only on a single organization, it provides an illustration of the importance of reflecting the organization’s culture through its HRPP, and of how they could operate synergistically for optimal impact.

This case illustrated how a company following a set of HRPP contrary to industry norms could succeed. In addition, it pinpointed some areas where HRPP either reduced costs or made the company more responsive to customer needs.

This case illustrated that a company can be both humanistic and efficient. Moreover, it demonstrated a number of ways that the financial success of the company could be shared with its employees.

A review of the literature found that companies that practiced a progressive set of HRPP and made decisions based on democratic principles are rare. Thus, knowledge of such a company should be valuable.

Details

Employee Ownership and Employee Involvement at Work: Case Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-520-7

Keywords

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