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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Mary Morris and Andrea Davies

Purpose – This chapter represents a dynamic cycle in a collaborative inquiry conceived some six years ago. The aim of this study is to share some of our reflections…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter represents a dynamic cycle in a collaborative inquiry conceived some six years ago. The aim of this study is to share some of our reflections, tensions, questions and uncertainties in positioning our own emotional responses as legitimate research data.

Methodology/Approach – We adopted a collaborative second-person methodology within an action research framework in the process of inquiring into our own practice as systemic psychotherapists and women.

Findings – We offer reflections on the positioning of emotion as researchers, tutors and psychotherapists. We discuss three themes from the emotional landscape of the inquiry, research process, research product and gendered voices, in anticipation that they will connect with and be useful to other researchers.

Originality/Value – The chapter introduces our sense-making framework for reflexively exploring the salience of emotion in research. It argues that attenuating, listening and responding to the emotions we feel as researchers both serves as a guide to inquiring into critical social constructs and engenders opportunities to promote social change.

Details

Emotion and the Researcher: Sites, Subjectivities, and Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-611-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1998

Mary Davies, Frances Boyle and Susan Osborne

The growth of CAS‐IAS (current alerting service — individual article supply) services in the 1990s has not delivered the rapid benefits expected by information…

Abstract

The growth of CAS‐IAS (current alerting service — individual article supply) services in the 1990s has not delivered the rapid benefits expected by information practitioners. This article focuses on the alerting aspects of CAS‐IAS services and documents the results of a series of surveys carried out at a UK cancer research institute over a four year period. By the first quarter of 1997, in over 50% of cases in a sample group of titles the shelf issue was more current, or as current, as the alerting services. The article also includes a mid‐1997 overview of the CAS‐IAS services available and lists factors to be considered by information practitioners in any evaluation of the document delivery aspect of CAS‐IAS services. The conclusion is that the monitoring of service developments and their performance will have to continue for the foreseeable future.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Mary Davies

This paper summarises the factors influencing the selection and implementation of BASIS (Release K) and its library application packages (TechLib/STACS/BILL) in the…

Abstract

This paper summarises the factors influencing the selection and implementation of BASIS (Release K) and its library application packages (TechLib/STACS/BILL) in the creation of seven end user databases at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (ICRF). The Science Citation Index source tapes are used to provide a current‐awareness service and an online search service of the latest six months of data. A full‐text database of scientific reports, and details of staff publications and staff laboratories is created. The BILL (British Interlibrary Loans) module of BASIS is used for the large number (12,000 + p.a.) of interlibrary loans and photocopy requests at ICRF. The emphasis is on local requirements and customisation of the program modules for end users rather than a detailed description of their standard features.

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Program, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Frances Boyle and Mary Davies

The access versus holdings debate has been one of the “hot topics” within the information world for some time, and the performance of document delivery services is an…

Abstract

The access versus holdings debate has been one of the “hot topics” within the information world for some time, and the performance of document delivery services is an integral part of the discussion. This article focuses on work currently being undertaken at the University of Liverpool to investigate and evaluate existing and future document supply services. Reference is made to related literature, the background to the pilot projects is explained, and the criteria utilised for the inclusion of services are propounded. A detailed evaluation of the following services is included: BL’s inside, BODOS, Ei Text from Elsevier Engineering Information Inc., LAMDA and UnCover. Preliminary results are reported. The conclusion to date is that, in their current from, document delivery services cannot be seen as a panacea for resolving the holdings versus access debate.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1906

Although there are contradictory reports in regard to the tinned meat scandal in America, there is not the least doubt that an appalling condition of things prevails, and…

Abstract

Although there are contradictory reports in regard to the tinned meat scandal in America, there is not the least doubt that an appalling condition of things prevails, and to the ordinary person who knows little or nothing of the extent to which food adulteration and other such malpractices exist in this country as well as elsewhere, such revelations as those which have recently been made by the daily press must come as a shock. To those whose duty it is to acquaint themselves with the nature and quality of the food supply of the people, the revelations are not so startling. The layman would hardly believe that the cases of obscure poisoning which repeatedly occur, sometimes resulting in death, and sometimes producing more or less severe attacks of illness, are largely due to the use of bad tinned foods. According to various reports from reliable sources, some of the practices in vogue at the Chicago packing houses are too disgusting to be given publicity to, but the malpractices which have been revealed in connection with the manufacture of tinned meat products, such as the use of diseased carcases, filthy offal and sweepings, putrid and decomposed meat artificially coloured and preserved with boric acid or some other chemical preservative, of potted ham made from mouldy flesh, of sausages made from the sweepings of the packing houses where it is the habit of the employees to expectorate freely on the floor, will tend to make people refuse to purchase any kind of tinned food, and unfortunately the manufacturer of good and wholesome products is sure to suffer. As might have been anticipated, denials as to the allegations made have been put forward and circulated, no doubt at the instance of persons more or less interested in the maintenance of the practices referred to. It has been alleged that protection is afforded to the consumer by certain labels, which read, “Quality Guaranteed, Government Inspected,” but it appears from recent official reports that this statement in reality means nothing at all, and affords no guarantee whatever—which is precisely what we should have expected. The absurdity and criminality of permitting the admixture of chemical preservatives with articles of food are well illustrated by these exposures, and we have more justification than ever in asking that our own Government authorities will make up their minds to take the action which has so long and so forcibly been urged upon them with respect to this form of adulteration.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1944

1. The Committee was informed that the manufacture of shredded suet from imported premier jus is subject to control by licence and that it is a condition of the licences…

Abstract

1. The Committee was informed that the manufacture of shredded suet from imported premier jus is subject to control by licence and that it is a condition of the licences that the product shall contain not less than 83 per cent. of fat. This figure was adopted in 1931 by the Council of the Society of Public Analysts and Other Analytical Chemists pending the establishment of a legal standard. 2. In the manufacture of shredded suet premier jus the fat is forced into shreds or granules and a cereal or amylaceous filler is added so as to form a coating over the particles of fat, thus preventing them from adhering together and at the same time retarding the development of rancidity. 3. The amount of filler taken up by the shredded fat depends primarily on its stickiness, which in turn depends on the temperature at which the manufacturing process is conducted. Manufacturers must give special attention to the problem of securing uniformity of distribution, otherwise part of a batch will take up more than its share of the amount of filler allowed by the manufacturing formula. In spite of all practicable care, complete uniformity cannot be ensured and some tolerance is therefore necessary to allow for unavoidable variations. 4. The proportion of filler used in the past by different manufacturers has varied considerably. A purchaser of shredded suet is primarily purchasing fat and it is desirable that the fat content shall be the maximum that can be included whilst still retaining good keeping properties. The Committee is of the opinion that shredded suet, to be of satisfactory quality, should not contain substantially less than 85 percent. of fat, and that a product approximating to this standard will have the necessary keeping properties. The Committee is satisfied that the allowance of 2 per cent. for uneven distribution on and among the shreds, which was adopted by the Council of the Society of Public Analysts in 1931, is reasonable, and understands that it is considered adequate by the manufacturers of shredded suet. 5. A small amount of suet (i.e., natural unrendered fat), received by butchers as part of their meat allocation, is chopped or minced, and in the latter case mixed with cereal filler and sold under the description “shredded suet.” By whichever method it is prepared it differs from the shredded suet made from premier jus by reason of the presence of membrane and moisture. If made by chopping it will contain more fat than the product made from premier jus, but if made by mincing and admixture with a filler it is likely to contain less owing to the membrane and moisture in the raw material and the impracticability of analytical control. 6. It was suggested to the Committee that the use of the description shredded suet for the products made by butchers was misleading and that the name should be restricted to the product made from premier jus. The Committee is, however, of the opinion that the general public would be equally satisfied whether the product supplied in response to a demand for shredded suet had been prepared with premier jus or suet. Further, it is considered that a purchaser of shredded suet is not prejudiced if he receives a product containing membrane and moisture provided he also receives the appropriate amount of fat. It therefore does not appear to the Committee that there is any necessity, from the viewpoint of protecting the public in regard to quality, for recommending the imposition of this restriction. 7. The Committee noted that the statement issued by the Council of the Society of Public Analysts included an expression of opinion that “the nature of any admixture to suet should be declared.” This recommendation is, however, outside the terms of reference of the Committee and no comment is therefore made thereon. 8. The Committee accordingly recommends that shredded suet should be required to contain not less than 83 per cent. of fat.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

JoAnne Sparks, Grace Saw and Mary Davies

陰陽 (yinyáng in Pinyin) is about interconnectedness rather than opposites. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how collaboration connects and strengthens the efforts…

Abstract

Purpose

陰陽 (yinyáng in Pinyin) is about interconnectedness rather than opposites. The purpose of this paper is to highlight how collaboration connects and strengthens the efforts across the sector and reinforces how the sum of the parts is greater than any one university alone. This paper shares the experience of conducting a collaborative project with three universities. It illustrates the fine balancing act of collaboration (yin) with competition (yang) amongst three of Australia ' s higher education institutions at a national level, with the aim of contributing to the career development of professionals in the fields of library services and eResearch.

Design/methodology/approach

Bond University, University of Western Australia and Griffith University have collaborated to develop a career mapping toolkit which builds on an earlier commissioned project completed by Council of Australian IT Directors (CAUDIT) focusing on enterprise information technology roles. This tri-institutional collaborative project reviews in detail the skills, knowledge and abilities of library and eResearch management roles in the respective organisations.

Findings

This project has been hugely rewarding for the initial three project partners who worked and collaborated well together, successfully completing project goals within agreed timeframes. Looking forward, career pathing will become more widespread as managers receive the requisite training, take ownership of these activities and grow to fully realise the value and potential of active career management to team performance. Ultimately, the use of the career pathing toolkit will enhance career satisfaction of the individual which in turn will lift the productivity of the organisational unit.

Research limitations/implications

To ensure the ongoing viability of the career pathing toolkit, it is necessary to measure its relevance and effectiveness: each institution is confident in adopting/modifying the final product for internal use. This demonstrates confidence in the quality of the work produced by the other collaborators; adoption of the product by institutions which were not part of the initial collaboration; and willingness of another institution (not originally involved) to join the collaborative project and make a contribution.

Practical implications

The catalyst for collaboration between the three universities was realised when the authors saw an opportunity to address the important and pressing issue of career and workforce planning as a partnership project. The main objective for collaboration was to achieve a more comprehensive and speedier project outcome.

Social implications

This paper shares the outcomes of the project which illustrates the fine balancing act of collaboration (yin) with competition (yang) amongst three of Australia ' s higher education institutions at a national level, with the aim of contributing to the career development of professionals in the fields of library and eResearch.

Originality/value

The aim is to develop a toolkit that: catalogues and maps the core professional roles needed in the next two to three years in the respective institutions; and specifies the knowledge and experience required in each core professional area including where there is overlap. In essence, the career map provides a toolkit for identifying the knowledge areas and skills, abilities and competencies required for each core area (organised by career streams) and professional role.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1900

Some misconception appears to have arisen in respect to the meaning of Section 11 of the Food and Drugs Act, 1899, owing, doubtless, to the faulty punctuation of certain…

Abstract

Some misconception appears to have arisen in respect to the meaning of Section 11 of the Food and Drugs Act, 1899, owing, doubtless, to the faulty punctuation of certain copies of the Act, and the Sanitary Record has done good service by calling attention to the matter. The trouble has clearly been caused by the insertion of a comma after the word “condensed” in certain copies of the Act, and the non‐insertion of this comma in other copies. The words of the section, as printed by the Sanitary Record, are as follows: “Every tin or other receptacle containing condensed, separated or skimmed milk must bear a label clearly visible to the purchaser on which the words ‘Machine‐skimmed Milk,’ or ‘Skimmed Milk,’ as the case may require, are printed in large and legible type.”

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1949

Not very long ago H.M. Government plastered walls and hoardings with a large scale portrait of a haggard woman in deep mourning surmounted by the words “ Keep Death Off…

Abstract

Not very long ago H.M. Government plastered walls and hoardings with a large scale portrait of a haggard woman in deep mourning surmounted by the words “ Keep Death Off the Roads ”. A solemn warning for the rising toll taken of human life through the carelessness of others. It seems strange that no similar publicity is vouchsafed to the number of deaths caused through food poisoning. Figures recently quoted give these as five thousand a year. The Central Council for Health Education set the ball rolling in 1947 when they held a one‐day conference on food and drink infections which was attended by representatives of all branches of the food industry and of local authorities in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Advocating the instruction of managements, food handlers, and housewives, Dr. Robert Sutherland, Medical Adviser and Secretary to the Central Council, explained that the purpose of the conference was to get local authorities to start a campaign in their own area to encourage the food handler to become conscious of his responsibilities. Posters, leaflets, film strips, lecture syllabuses were all to be made available, and this looked like a step in the right direction. Guildford, Surrey, perhaps as a result of this conference, staged a campaign for cleaner food last March. They issued pamphlets, demonstrated likely hiding places for germs, and bestowed certificates upon those shops and premises agreeing to a certain standard in the preparation of food. (An article by the M.O.H., Guildford, in last month's issue, on page 122, described this campaign.) More recently, the Mayor of Lambeth has been saying much on the subject of hygiene; he even attributes some cases of food poisoning to the nail varnish adorning the fingers of waitresses. This is perhaps carrying things a little too far, but the Mayor rightly pounces on the dangers of hidden bacteria in cracked china. Much controversy has been waged on whether or not cracked cups are a potential source of infection. A writer in a recent issue of The Municipal Journal discounts this theory and says that the risk of anyone acquiring infection from a cup or glass with a chip in it is so remote as to be not worth considering. Having dismissed the danger so lightly, he goes on to say that the cracked and chipped utensil is really only disliked because something that is clean and pleasant to look at is preferred. This, no doubt, is true, but the warnings, supported by test results, given and made by Dr. Sidney Linfoot and published in The Lancet in 1945 cannot be disregarded. That these dangers are very real was demonstrated by the results of a bacteriological examination of twenty cups obtained from different public restaurants in which the microorganisms obtained from cultures from the cracks in each of the cups were enumerated. In many cases there was a free growth of Staph. aureus and also haemolytic streptococcus. There was also a fairly frequent appearance of intestinal organisms (B. coli, B. proteus, etc.) and one cup gave a heavy growth of Friedlander's bacillus. Nearly all the organisms found were such as are commonly associated with stomatitis and mouth and gum complaints generally. Dr. Linfoot further suggested that the presence of Friedlander's bacillus was also an indication that respiratory organisms might be a source of infection and that it was reasonable to assume that the Klebs‐Loeffler bacillus might be found if the cups had been used by a carrier. The presence of haemolytic streptococci is also a reminder that a cracked cup may be an agent in the spread of scarlet fever. Syphilitic infection is unlikely but not impossible, and in the same category falls tuberculosis. These organisms, particularly the former, would be difficult to discover from cracks, but the fact that even relatively easily killed organisms can be found alive in such sites suggests that their transmission is not impossible. The most obvious danger, states Dr. Linfoot, is that of ulcerative stomatitis. Education of the public, always a little dubious about the existence of microbes, would mean expensive advertising campaigns; legislation would help, but there are doubts as to whether or not it could be enforced. According to the Ministry of Food, Dr. Edith Summerskill is already busy drawing up a list of by‐laws for submission to local authorities with a code of practice applicable to every trade. This is useful, but in no way sufficient to tackle the problem. It has been suggested that much could be done by the private medical practitioner who, during contacts with patients, could drop a word of warning. Talk will not solve the problem: strong measures are needed substantially to reduce this appalling loss of life each year which, by the exercise of strict hygiene in the kitchen, canteen or restaurant, and by the supervision of staff cleanliness, could to some extent be curtailed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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