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1 – 10 of 94
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1915

The March issue of the Journal of Chemical Technology contains the following article, with every word of which we cordially agree. It is gratifying to find that there is…

Abstract

The March issue of the Journal of Chemical Technology contains the following article, with every word of which we cordially agree. It is gratifying to find that there is one—if only one—of our scientific Journals which has the courage and the patriotism to speak out and to do so in vigorous terms. The indictment of the flabby persons belonging to the Chemical Profession who by their ineptitude and inertia are condoning the bestial crimes of the modern Huns is well‐timed and thoroughly deserved.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Mary Callaghan, Michal Molcho, Saoirse Nic Gabhainn and Colette Kelly

– Availability and access to food is a determinant of obesity. The purpose of this paper is to examine food availability within and outside of post-primary schools in Ireland.

1946

Abstract

Purpose

Availability and access to food is a determinant of obesity. The purpose of this paper is to examine food availability within and outside of post-primary schools in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on the internal school food environment were collected from 63 post-primary schools using questionnaires. The external school food environment for these 63 schools was assessed by mapping food businesses within 1 km of schools, using a Geographic Information System (GIS). Food businesses were categorised based on type of food sold.

Findings

A total of 68.3 per cent of schools had a canteen, 52.5 per cent had a small food shop and 37.1 per cent had a vending machine. A total of 32.7 per cent of schools reported selling chips (French fries) in their canteen while 44.2 per cent of schools reported selling energy-dense nutrient-poor foods in their school shop. Of the schools surveyed, there was an average of 3.89 coffee shops and sandwich bars, 3.65 full service restaurants, 2.60 Asian and other “ethnic” restaurants, 4.03 fast food restaurants, 1.95 supermarkets, 6.71 local shops and 0.73 fruit and vegetable retailers within a 1 km radius of the post-primary schools. Findings are presented by geography (urban/rural), disadvantage (Delivering Equality of Opportunity in School (DEIS)/non DEIS), gender (girls/boys/mixed) and food policy in place at the school (yes/no).

Practical implications

These data will facilitate schools working on the framework for Health Promoting Schools in Ireland.

Social implications

This work can contribute to current discussions on restricting accessibility to certain foods and food premises for school children.

Originality/value

The study explores the internal and external school food environment. GIS have been used to link the external food environment to specific schools thus allowing a comprehensive analysis of the schools’ food environment. To the authors knowledge, this is the first time that both environments are explored simultaneously.

Details

Health Education, vol. 115 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Sophie Dilworth, Isabel Higgins, Vicki Parker, Brian Kelly and Jane Turner

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine multidisciplinary, group clinical supervision sessions and to extend current understandings of the barriers/enablers to…

441

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine multidisciplinary, group clinical supervision sessions and to extend current understandings of the barriers/enablers to the implementation of an innovative psychosocial intervention for distressed adults with cancer.

Design/methodology/approach

Discourse analysis was used to analyse audio recordings from clinical supervision sessions delivered as part of a psychosocial intervention within the context of a randomised control trial (RCT).

Findings

Examination of subject positions, representation and tensions reveals that Health Professionals can resists the pressures of systemic barriers to provide much‐needed psychosocial support for distressed adults with cancer. Critical examination of multidisciplinary clinical supervision sessions describes how Health Professionals are able to construct new meanings and reposition themselves as being able to provide supportive care within the context of their everyday practices.

Research limitations/implications

This paper reports only a small part of a larger analysis that aims to explore how discourse maps the current state of psychosocial care for adults with cancer and illustrates the fragility and potential for change in this area.

Originality/value

Extension on the previous literature is seen within the data through the presence of positive resistance against systemic barriers. Previous exploration of clinical supervision has not collected data generated within the sessions. It is also novel in the use of discourse analysis being used in association with a randomised controlled trial to understand the situational complexities associated with bringing about practice change.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Edmund O’Callaghan and Don O’Riordan

This research examined changes in Dublin’s tertiary city centre shopping streets over a 30‐year period to 2002. An observational study of the occupancy of the city’s…

1692

Abstract

This research examined changes in Dublin’s tertiary city centre shopping streets over a 30‐year period to 2002. An observational study of the occupancy of the city’s tertiary streetscape was undertaken in the summer of 2002 and compared with historical data. Results indicate significant change over the period examined: an increased vacancy rate, a very low survival rate, a considerable incidence of non‐retail specific activities, a decline in traditional retail offerings and the emergence of new categories of retailer. The paper concludes by suggesting a proactive approach is required by present day retailers in the tertiary streets to ensure future survival.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Robert Zinko, William A. Gentry and Mary Dana Laird

The current, established scale used to measure personal reputation treats the construct as a unidimensional measure. For example, the scale fails to distinguish between…

Abstract

Purpose

The current, established scale used to measure personal reputation treats the construct as a unidimensional measure. For example, the scale fails to distinguish between individuals who are known for being socially popular versus those who are known for being experts in their field. This study aims to address this issue by developing a multidimensional personal reputation scale.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on existing theory, a scale is developed and validated against existing, similar constructs. First, a panel of three academic experts who have done research on personal reputation, and also two professional experts who have rich experience in the management field, evaluated the items for face validity. Then 112 working adults were asked to rate the reputation of a co-worker. Each dimension of personal reputation was validated against an existing, similar scale (e.g. social reputation was validated against an existing “popularity” scale).

Findings

A multi-dimensional, personal reputation scale is presented. This measure purports that personal reputation has three dimensions: task, social and integrity.

Originality/value

The presented scale allows researchers to distinguish different types of reputations in the workplace. This is significant because both anecdotal evidence and empirical findings suggest that to simply assume that reputation based upon being a person of high integrity and upon being an expert at a specific task will present the same outcomes is a fallacy. To further the knowledge of personal reputation, a need exists to be able to measure the different dimensions of reputation.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Histories of Punishment and Social Control in Ireland: Perspectives from a Periphery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-607-7

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Judy Callaghan

Elder abuse has come to be recognized as any act of both commission or omission that causes harm or loss to elderly people. This can include active or passive neglect…

1138

Abstract

Elder abuse has come to be recognized as any act of both commission or omission that causes harm or loss to elderly people. This can include active or passive neglect, violence, sexual or emotional abuse, various kinds of theft, and deprivation of the person’s human rights. Elder abuse has many causes. The Hastings and Prince Edward Council on Aging developed an Elder Abuse Community Response Protocol to help address this problem.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Mary-Lieta Clément and Christophe Roux-Dufort

This article aims to explore the tragic nature of crisis and identify managers’ decision-making processes and strategies when they are trapped by events beyond their…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the tragic nature of crisis and identify managers’ decision-making processes and strategies when they are trapped by events beyond their understanding and control. In this article, the tragic is viewed as the collision of an overdetermined scenario perceived as inevitable, insurmountable and irreparable and the managers' strategies to free themselves from this scenario and divert its trajectory.

Design/methodology/approach

We make a crossed literature review between crisis management and Greek tragedy as proposed by scholars in classical literature.

Findings

We make two theoretical contributions to the literature on crisis management. First, we articulate a set of research proposals into a model to explain how managers' decisions make the crisis tragic. Second, we enrich the field of crisis management by highlighting strategies in order to avoid them.

Originality/value

We use Greek tragedy, not as a metaphor to characterize the consequences of crises as the authors usually do, but as an analytical lens to explore their inexorable, insurmountable and irremediable nature and the decisions made by managers that would make crises tragic.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Peter Fleming and Andrew Sturdy

The paper seeks to explore the nature and employee experience of an emergent approach to managing employees which emphasises “being yourself” through the expression of…

17883

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to explore the nature and employee experience of an emergent approach to managing employees which emphasises “being yourself” through the expression of fun, individuality and difference.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises interviews and observations in a US‐owned call centre in Australia.

Findings

The management approach outlined is located within the emergence of market rationalism and associated claims of the limitations of normative control. With its emphasis on diversity and identity derived from non‐(paid) work contexts, it is presented as complementary to, but distinct from, the group conformity and organisational identity associated with conventional culture and “fun” management. The seemingly liberal regime is shown to be controlling in its limited scope and by exposing more of the employees' self to the corporation. This raises questions about the nature of workplace control, resistance and the meaning of authenticity at work.

Originality/value

The research provides an insight into an approach to management which has been largely neglected in research and proposes a modified concept of culture and “fun” management – neo‐normative control. It also serves to challenge the liberal claims made by proponents of the new approach and of “fun at work” more generally, that it is liberating for employees, a form of “existential empowerment”.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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