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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2010

Kosheek Sewchurran, Derek Smith and Dewald Roode

The paper aims to paper an overview of a completed doctoral thesis which pursued the development of underlying theory (ontology) to give coherence to research in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to paper an overview of a completed doctoral thesis which pursued the development of underlying theory (ontology) to give coherence to research in the information systems (IS) project management space.

Design/methodology/approach

As a result of the considerable concern about a lack of underlying theory in project management the author has chosen to investigate the development of underlying theory to serve as a regional ontology to give debates undertaken to improve IS project management coherence. The thesis is a critical interpretive a priori effort. In the pursuit of the goal of developing a regional ontology, the notions, concepts and theories related to existentialism and social construction were investigated. These were investigated because the research literature places considerable emphasis on the need to understand as‐lived project experiences.

Findings

One of the significant outcomes that results from this research is the development of a proposed regional ontology. This was achieved by fusing the theories of Heidegger's Dasein, Bourdieu's “Theory of practice” and Maturana and Varela's “Theory of living systems”. The regional ontology is a consolidation of the various concepts defined by these researchers. These theories complement each other to give rise to a relational model of social construction which also has related phenomenological, existential and biological perspectives.

Practical implications

The proposed ontology was interpreted using the popular alternatives that have recently emerged alongside the established best practices such as project management body of knowledge. The perspectives of complex, responsive processes of relating, the temporary organisation, agility and organisational becoming were reviewed using the regional ontology. The interpretation process illustrated that the regional ontology is able to provide a more fundamental and coherent context to subsume and delimit these emerging new frames.

Originality/value

The thesis also discusses the researcher's view of contemporary project management practice that accords with the regional ontology principles. Through argument and the contemporary context of IS project management practice that was sketched, the principles of the regional ontology are illuminated. Through this process it was possible to claim that established best practice modes of education should not exist in isolation but should instead be situated within a wider analogical context that embraces the values of learning, becoming and innovating.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2005

Cecile K. M. Crutzen

Questioning gender is about taking an active, critical role in the technological design of our daily behaviour. It is a deconstruction of the oppositions that exist in the…

Abstract

Questioning gender is about taking an active, critical role in the technological design of our daily behaviour. It is a deconstruction of the oppositions that exist in the discourses of Ambient Intelligence designers, the ICT industry and computer scientists. What underlies the assumption that Ambient Intelligence will, by disappearing into our environment, bring humans both an easy and entertaining life? The gender perspective can uncover power relations within the promotion and realisation of Ambient Intelligence that satisfy an obvious wish for a technological heaven. The deconstruction of the promise of progress and a better life reveals what is overvalued, what is undervalued and what is ignored. This paper is a deconstruction of the view, currently prevalent in the discourses of Ambient Intelligence; a view of humans and the way they live. A view that will influence the way women and men will be allowed to construct their lives.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Kaisa Broner-Bauer

The article deals with the environmental consciousness emerged from the 1970's onwards, and with subsequent change in the ideology of city planning. The focus is on the…

Abstract

The article deals with the environmental consciousness emerged from the 1970's onwards, and with subsequent change in the ideology of city planning. The focus is on the development of urban conservation methods and on the maintenance of the built environment, which have marked a decisive shift away from the CIAM theses that dominated urban thinking during half-a-century. The decision to take the existing built environment as the starting point for all actions of city planning and design has been a radical stand for a new approach, corresponding to and paralleling the idea of sustainable development that crystallized in the 1980's up to the 1992 UN Conference. Grassroots-level strategies are considered important for all actions towards a sustainable way of life. The case of Finland is studied in some detail, with the conservation atlas of the historic milieu as an example of teaching a sustainable approach to environmental planning and design.

Details

Open House International, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Robert Kronenburg

This paper explores the genre of flexible architecture - buildings that are intended to respond to changing situations in their use, operation, or location. This is…

Abstract

This paper explores the genre of flexible architecture - buildings that are intended to respond to changing situations in their use, operation, or location. This is architecture that adapts rather than stagnates; responds to change rather than rejects it; is motive rather than static. It is a design form that is by its essence cross-disciplinary and multi-functional and consequently, is frequently innovative and expressive of contemporary design issues. By revealing its basis and the factors that are determining its development, the value and relevancy of flexible architecture to contemporary problems associated with technological, social and economic change can be revealed.

The characteristics of flexible architecture are explored by examining the design decisions that lead to culturally responsive buildings. It examines the underlying factors that generate a sense of place and why traditional and historic building patterns have been successful in creating genuinely adaptable architecture. It relates the characteristics of flexible architecture to Open Building principles and examines the effect that such design can have within the different levels in the built environment. The paper focuses special attention on contemporary architecture by examining the recent work of the Japanese architect Toyo Ito, in particular his recently completed Matsumoto Performing Arts Centre, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. Based on conversation with the designer and first-hand study of the building, the specific factors that make this new design a valuable resource in the search for flexible architecture strategies are explored.

This paper expands on the author's previous research into the foundation areas of this topic, in particular the genre of portable architecture, the impact of technology on the development of architectural form, and the development of experimental and innovative house design in the twentieth century. Its subject is expanded in his forthcoming book Flexible: Architecture That Responds to Change to be published by Laurence King, London, in 2006.

Details

Open House International, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Mark A. Lutz

Introduction Today we find ourselves at a rather curious historical juncture. World poverty is more of a problem today than it was three decades ago. North‐south relations…

Abstract

Introduction Today we find ourselves at a rather curious historical juncture. World poverty is more of a problem today than it was three decades ago. North‐south relations are more disharmonious than ever and, as a result, the development of the south is more urgent than ever. Yet, at the same time, the main tool of modern social science to tackle this problem, development economics, has turned out to be rather ineffective, throwing thereby the entire field into a deep crisis. It is not much of an exaggeration to claim that development economics as traditionally conceived is so seriously ill that it is not clear whether there is any life left. A leading scholar of the discipline, Alfred Hirschman, has found it necessary to write an essay that sounds more like an obituary than anything else (Hirschman, 1986). The basic tasks that now remain are to assess what went wrong and to explore new directions.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Roger Friedland

In this paper, I compare Theodore Schatzki’s practice theory, the existential phenomenology of Martin Heidegger upon whom Schatzki drew in its formation, and my own theory…

Abstract

In this paper, I compare Theodore Schatzki’s practice theory, the existential phenomenology of Martin Heidegger upon whom Schatzki drew in its formation, and my own theory of institutional logics which I have sought to develop as a religious sociology of institution. I examine how Schatzki and I both differently locate our thinking at the level of practice. In this essay I also explore the possibility of appropriating Heidegger’s religious ontology of worldhood, which Schatzki rejects, in that project. My institutional logical position is an atheological religious one, poly-onto-teleological. Institutional logics are grounded in ultimate goods which are praiseworthy “objects” of striving and practice, signifieds to which elements of an institutional logic have a non-arbitrary relation, sources of and references for practical norms about how one should have, make, do or be that good, and a basis of knowing the world of practice as ordered around such goods. Institutional logics are constellations co-constituted by substances, not fields animated by values, interests or powers.

Because we are speaking against “values,” people are horrified at a philosophy that ostensibly dares to despise humanity’s best qualities. For what is more “logical” than that a thinking that denies values must necessarily pronounce everything valueless? Martin Heidegger, “Letter on Humanism” (2008a, p. 249).

Details

On Practice and Institution: Theorizing the Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-413-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Kenneth W. Stikkers

Mainstream economics has long prided itself to be an empirical “science”, at least in aspiration if not yet in practice. Yet, some of the most elementary, commonplace…

Abstract

Mainstream economics has long prided itself to be an empirical “science”, at least in aspiration if not yet in practice. Yet, some of the most elementary, commonplace premises of the discipline are flatly contradicted by the empirical findings of cultural anthropology. Karl Polanyi made this point:

Details

Humanomics, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Eric Bolle

The purpose of this paper is to identify what the philosophy of Martin Heidegger (1889‐1976) can contribute to the training of managers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify what the philosophy of Martin Heidegger (1889‐1976) can contribute to the training of managers.

Design/methodology/approach

After a short introduction focussing on philosophy and management, Heidegger's potential contribution to managers will be addressed via Safranski's book Martin Heidegger: Between Good and Evil.

Findings

It is often said that change in organizations is hard or even impossible to achieve because people are afraid of change. Safranski however shows how Heidegger considers anxiety as a gateway to change. I propose to read Heidegger's Being and Time as a handbook on management skills.

Originality/value

In terms of philosophy and management an unexpected juxtaposition is made and interpreted.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Book part
Publication date: 7 February 2011

Robin Holt and Jörgen Sandberg

Phenomena are what we as researchers begin with, and to study phenomena is to appreciate how any determination of things and events always relates back to the context in…

Abstract

Phenomena are what we as researchers begin with, and to study phenomena is to appreciate how any determination of things and events always relates back to the context in which they appeared. Phenomenology is the study of such relations of appearance and the conditions of such relations. Appearance is an active rather than superficial condition, a constant bringing together of experiencing beings and experienced things (including sentient beings), in what the modern “father” of phenomenology Edmund Husserl called conditions of intentionality, and what his errant, one-time student Martin Heidegger called conditions of thrownness and projection. This chapter delves into the philosophical background of this mode of study, before opening up into consideration of, first, where phenomenology has been influential in organization studies, and, second, the potential of the approach. In so doing, we suggest much can be made of reorienting research in organization studies away from an entitative epistemology in which things are seen in increasingly causally linked, detailed isolation, and toward a relational epistemology in which what exists is understood in terms of its being experienced within everyday lives.

Details

Philosophy and Organization Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-596-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Steven D. Brown and Geoffrey M. Lightfoot

Explores how the work of Martin Heidegger may be read alongside our contemporary understandings of information technology. It begins by considering the view of information…

Abstract

Explores how the work of Martin Heidegger may be read alongside our contemporary understandings of information technology. It begins by considering the view of information as degraded knowledge, a position refuted by Heidegger’s account of truth as correctness. Information is thereafter treated as a form of availability, grounded in the relation between humans and equipment, which is characterised by its insistence. A differentiation between various forms of equipment is made by way of Heidegger’s later writings on technics, leading to a discussion of information technology in the shadow of enframing, or emplacement. The central place of “anxiety” in our relationship to new technologies is underscored, and offered up as a way of thinking beyond the escalation of calculative ordering.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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