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Article

Martin Morgan Tuuli

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of project settings on empowerment experiences of individuals and teams by examining the effects of specific project…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of project settings on empowerment experiences of individuals and teams by examining the effects of specific project characteristics on facets of the empowerment concept (i.e. the structural and psychological perspectives).

Design/methodology/approach

A parallel questionnaire survey of client, consultant and contractor organisations was conducted in Hong Kong to test hypotheses relating three facets of the empowerment concept and five project-level antecedents. Hierarchical linear modelling and ordinary least square regression were employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The analyses show that dynamic project environments, high project team integration and high interdependence of project tasks lead to high individual psychological empowerment, while public-client projects (compared with private-client projects), a hostile project environment and high client integration lead to a low individual psychological empowerment. Uncertainty in project technology also leads to high team psychological empowerment, while hostile project environments lead to low team psychological empowerment. Further, dynamic project environments lead to more empowering work climate, while hostile project environments lead to less empowering work climate. However, project team integration, project complexity, project lifecycle and quasi-public-client projects (compared with private-client projects) have no significant association with the empowerment of individuals and teams.

Originality/value

This study examined task-related factors (i.e. project in this case) which traditionally have not been the focus of studies examining the antecedents of empowerment. Further, project-level antecedents and their link to an integrated perspective of empowerment comprising a sociostructural perspective, a psychological perspective and a team-based perspective are examined, which is a significant departure from the unitary perspective of empowerment taken in most previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article

Chika Amadi, Pat Carrillo and Martin Tuuli

The implementation of public–private partnerships (PPPs), particularly in low- and middle-income countries, has been hampered by external stakeholders’ opposition leading…

Abstract

Purpose

The implementation of public–private partnerships (PPPs), particularly in low- and middle-income countries, has been hampered by external stakeholders’ opposition leading to the failure of several projects. The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to improve external stakeholder management in PPP projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies consisting of 23 interviews with a wide range of internal and external stakeholders were employed. This was supplemented with a focus group approach to validate the framework.

Findings

A new framework for the management of external stakeholders is developed. It encompasses new features such as the dynamic identification of stakeholders at each project phase and their corresponding interests.

Research limitations/implications

The scope is road transportation projects in Nigeria and thus the recommendations may not be globally applicable.

Practical implications

The findings can help the public sector and their agencies to manage external stakeholders and maintain successful relationships on PPP projects.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to existing knowledge in four key areas: it confirms that the skill and actions of internal stakeholders are vital to the stakeholder management process; it shows that one-off stakeholder identification proposed in literature is a flawed approach; it proposes that the identification of external stakeholders’ interests be dynamic; and it adds the perspective of low- and middle-income countries in stakeholder management in PPP projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article

Enoch Sackey, Martin Tuuli and Andrew Dainty

The evolving roles of BIM and smart building technologies in the design and management of construction projects often present unexpected events and variabilities, which…

Abstract

Purpose

The evolving roles of BIM and smart building technologies in the design and management of construction projects often present unexpected events and variabilities, which tend to erode professionals’ prior knowledge authority. The purpose of this paper is to explore how construction organisations can deploy knowledge and adapt to the requisite skills in order to make fitting responses to the ever-evolving technological and organisational transformations to address the prevailing construction challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an abductive research approach that ensures back-and-forth iterative dialogue between the empirical data and an amalgam of the theoretical proposition towards new understanding of the phenomenon under investigation. A multiple case study method was adopted to collate the empirical data from three separate construction organisations as they transitioned into BIM compliant work processes.

Findings

The study has described new processes that not only mediate existing practices but focus on consistently resolving known tensions and contradictions between prior knowledge and the requirement of the changing work situation. The study also illustrates the cognitive synchronisation of the learning approaches within contemporary work organisations that align well with the merits and utilities entrenched within their niche technological choices.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the chosen research methodology, it is acknowledged that future comparative studies using a much larger quantitative data sample to further elucidate the findings of this paper would be an interesting further step.

Originality/value

The study contributes to construction management literature by providing new insights into expansive learning environments capable of addressing cognitive contradictions and ambiguities inherent in the changing contemporary work patterns in the construction context as a consequence of BIM deployment.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article

Chika Amadi, Patricia Carrillo and Martin Tuuli

This paper focusses on external stakeholders’ perspective of stakeholder management in public–private partnerships (PPP) projects within the context of developing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper focusses on external stakeholders’ perspective of stakeholder management in public–private partnerships (PPP) projects within the context of developing countries where public opposition to PPP projects is prevalent. The purpose of this paper is to identify the key enablers to PPP projects’ success from the perspective of external stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from two case studies via semi-structured interviews in two PPP project locations in Nigeria. In total, 14 external stakeholders comprising community leaders, trade unionists and human right activist participated in the research.

Findings

Five key enablers of external stakeholder management were identified. These are as follows: the choice of project location; transparency of the internal stakeholders; timing of stakeholder engagement; knowledge of PPP; and relationship with internal stakeholders.

Originality/value

External stakeholders’ perspective of stakeholder management in PPP projects within the context of developing countries new to PPP has been established. The practical implications of the five enablers can be used by policy makers and industry professionals to ensure effective stakeholder management of PPP projects.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article

Jemima Antwiwaa Ottou, Bernard Kofi Baiden, Gabriel Nani and Martin Morgan Tuuli

This research investigates the implementation of Six Sigma in competitive tendering processes to address persistent delays by identifying the potential benefits and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates the implementation of Six Sigma in competitive tendering processes to address persistent delays by identifying the potential benefits and challenges of implementing Six Sigma in construction competitive tendering processes. The results seek to encourage practitioners to implement Six Sigma in addressing competitive tendering process delays.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature was reviewed to identify the benefits and challenges of Six Sigma implementation in construction processes and categorized under broad headings. Three case studies were used to authenticate the literature findings by applying Define-Measure-Analyse-Improve-Control to their construction competitive tendering processes. Furthermore, quality tools and techniques together with documentary analysis, content analysis and determination of frequencies of quantitised qualitative data were employed to identify potential benefits and challenges.

Findings

The most common Six Sigma benefits achievable in construction competitive tendering are Time Related benefits. Other benefits likely to emanate as ripple effects are Customer Focus Related, Quality Related, Process Improvement Related, Human Resource Related, Finance Related and Decision Related. However, implementation challenges should be expected.

Practical implications

Six Sigma implementation in construction competitive tendering promotes time efficiency. It is expected that this will encourage quantity surveyors, procurement practitioners and their institutions to implement Six Sigma in addressing persistent delays in their competitive tendering processes.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the use of merged approach under mixed method to identify the benefits and challenges of Six Sigma implementation in construction competitive tendering process within the Ghanaian context.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article

Karen B. Blay, Martin Morgan Tuuli and Jojo France-Mensah

The purpose of this paper is to validate perceived benefits and challenges of managing change in Building Information Modelling (BIM) Level 2 projects and to further…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to validate perceived benefits and challenges of managing change in Building Information Modelling (BIM) Level 2 projects and to further explore the opportunities for enhancing the benefits and reducing the challenges. This research is timely because, hitherto, the benefits and challenges of managing change in BIM Level 2 remained largely unvalidated and the opportunities for enhancing the benefits and reducing challenges remained relatively unexplored.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of a questionnaire survey and interviews with BIM Level 2 practitioners in the UK was employed in this study. In all, 41 responses were received from the questionnaire survey and ten subsequent interviews with BIM practitioners were carried out to explore opportunities for reducing challenges and increasing benefits of managing change in BIM Level 2 projects.

Findings

The study confirms benefits and challenges of managing change in BIM Level 2 projects identified and synthesised from literature, a much needed validation. Additional benefits and challenges were also identified in this study, such as cost saving and risk reduction (benefits) and social dimension issues in the BIM Level 2 processes (challenges). Opportunities identified to enhance benefits and reduce challenges were mainly socially driven, and were either reactive or proactive in nature.

Research limitations/implications

Opportunities for reducing challenges and increasing benefits identified from this research can inform the change management processes in BIM-Level 2.

Practical implications

The findings provide concrete basis for shaping BIM Level 2 change management processes and requirements.

Social implications

The identification of behaviours as shaping the social requirements for BIM-Level 2 confirms the need for a socio-technical approach to successful BIM implementation.

Originality/value

The identification of behaviours as shaping the social requirements for BIM Level 2 confirms the need for a socio-technical approach to successful BIM implementation.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 21 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article

Martin Morgan Tuuli, Steve Rowlinson, Richard Fellows and Anita M.M. Liu

This paper aims to examine the impact of leadership style and team context on structural and psychological empowerment perceptions in project teams.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of leadership style and team context on structural and psychological empowerment perceptions in project teams.

Design/methodology/approach

It was posited that span of control and within team interdependence will positively and significantly influence both structural and psychological empowerment. Person‐orientated leadership style was also expected to positively impact both structural and psychological empowerment while task orientated leadership style was expected to have a negative impact. These hypothesized relationships were examined using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and hierarchical linear modelling (HLM) with data obtained through a parallel quantitative questionnaire survey of construction client, consultant and contractor organizations in Hong Kong.

Findings

No significant relationship was found between span of control and any facet of empowerment while team interdependence had a positive and significant relationship with psychological empowerment but not structural empowerment. Task‐orientated leadership was positively and significantly related to psychological empowerment in the full sample and contractor teams but not in consultant and client teams. Person‐orientated leadership was positively and significantly related to psychological empowerment in the full sample, consultant and client teams but not in contractor teams.

Originality/value

The link between leadership style, team context and three facets of empowerment are examined compared with previous studies often focusing on one facet. Sub‐sample analysis enabled more subtle differences of the impact of leadership style in different context to be revealed, an indication that samples may not be homogeneous.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article

Martin Morgan Tuuli and Steve Rowlinson

Empowerment is a concept that means different things to different individuals. The factors that engender feelings of empowerment are thus multifarious. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Empowerment is a concept that means different things to different individuals. The factors that engender feelings of empowerment are thus multifarious. The purpose of this paper is to focus on to the factors that empower individuals and teams in projects settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the critical incident technique (CIT), 122 critical incidents comprising 69 empowering and 53 disempowering experiences of 30 purposively selected construction professionals are elicited and analysed.

Findings

Adopting a broad frame of reference on the premise that empowerment of individuals and teams in project settings is associated with drivers and barriers related to: the individual; the team context; the organisation; and the project – mutually exclusive and exhaustive contextual influences within each frame of reference are identified. At the individual‐level, cultural values and factors related to the quality of relationships with leaders and colleagues emerged. At the team‐level, team context and leadership style are the key factors. At the organisation‐level, factors related to structure and culture emerged. At the project‐level, project characteristics, organisation, environment and technology‐related factors impacted the empowerment of individuals and teams.

Practical implications

Practically, the paper provides targets of concrete interventions by leaders and organisations desirous of fostering empowerment in project teams.

Originality/value

This paper adds to previous research in demonstrating the practicality of the CIT in construction specific research and the credibility and trustworthiness checks employed are exemplary of measures researchers using qualitative methodologies can take to assert the credibility of their findings and conclusions.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Content available
Article

Fiona Lettice

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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