Search results

1 – 10 of 33
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Henric Jonsson and Martin Rudberg

This paper aims to define key performance indicators (KPIs) for measuring performance of production systems for residential building from a production strategy perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to define key performance indicators (KPIs) for measuring performance of production systems for residential building from a production strategy perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is done to identify suitable competitive priorities and to provide grounds for developing KPIs to measure them. The KPIs are evaluated and validated through interviews with industry experts from five case companies producing multifamily residences. Furthermore, two of the case companies are used to illustrate how the KPIs can be employed for analysing different production systems from a manufacturing strategy perspective.

Findings

Defined, and empirically validated, KPIs for measuring the competitive priorities quality, cost (level and dependability), delivery (speed and dependability) and flexibility (volume and mix) of different production systems.

Research limitations/implications

To further validate the KPIs, more empirical tests need to be done and further research also needs to address mix flexibility, which better needs to account for product range to provide a trustworthy KPI.

Practical implications

The defined KPIs can be used to evaluate and monitor the performance of different production systems’ ability to meet market demands, hence focusing on the link between the market and the firm’s production function. The KPIs can also be used to track a production systems’ ability to perform over time.

Originality/value

Most research that evaluate and compare production systems for residential building is based on qualitative estimations of manufacturing outputs. There is a lack of quantitative KPIs to measure performance at a strategic level. This research does this, identifying what to measure, but also how to measure four competitive priorities through 14 defined KPIs.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Anna Fredriksson, Mats Janné and Martin Rudberg

The use of third-party logistics (TPL) setups in construction has increased but is still a new phenomenon. The purpose was to increase understanding of how structural and…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of third-party logistics (TPL) setups in construction has increased but is still a new phenomenon. The purpose was to increase understanding of how structural and management dimensions are related in CLSs by describing how CTPL setups are used.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten dimensions to describe and structure CLSs were identified from the literature and used to structure a cross-case analysis of 13 Swedish CLSs.

Findings

The main findings are: (1) there are three typical initiators of CLSs: municipalities, developers and contractors; (2) CLSs are drivers for service differentiation and modularization among TPL providers as construction specific services are required; (3) CLSs play a new role in construction by coordinating logistics activities between the construction project and the vicinity of the site.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on 13 cases in the Swedish construction context. Additional studies of CLSs in other countries are needed.

Practical implications

The ten dimensions can be used as a guide in designing a CLS and in determining the order of design decisions. The identification and structuring of CTPL services also exemplify the variety of service offerings.

Originality/value

This is one of the first cross-case analyses of CLSs enabling the characterization of CTPL setups. This study identifies how different services included in the setup relate to the roles of SCM and logistics in construction.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Micael Thunberg, Martin Rudberg and Tina Karrbom Gustavsson

This study aims to identify and categorise common on-site problems from a supply chain management (SCM) perspective and to trace the origin of these problems in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and categorise common on-site problems from a supply chain management (SCM) perspective and to trace the origin of these problems in the construction project process, the supply chain or in the intersection between these processes. This allows for identification of how on-site problems affect SCM in construction projects and how they can be mitigated.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review in combination with semi-structured interviews was used to identify on-site problems. This enabled triangulation and strengthened both construct validity and internal validity.

Findings

On-site problems can be categorised in one of the four following categories: material flows, internal communication, external communication or complexity. The first category has its origin in the supply chain, the second in the construction project process, the third in the supply chain-construction process intersection on site and the fourth in the construction project as a whole. The findings conclude that on-site problems often originate from construction companies’ lack of supply chain orientation.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that supply chain planning (SCP) can facilitate on-site problem mitigation in construction project management. This extends the body of knowledge of SCP in construction project management and supports the development of effective on-site construction project management.

Practical implications

The results show that SCP can aid construction project management in handling on-site problems earlier in the project process.

Originality/value

The main value lies in extending the body of knowledge in construction project management research by applying an SCM perspective and by introducing SCP to support more effective construction project management.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 April 2013

Patrik Jonsson, Martin Rudberg and Stefan Holmberg

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the prerequisites and effects of centralised supply chain planning at IKEA, and to explore how the planning process, planning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the prerequisites and effects of centralised supply chain planning at IKEA, and to explore how the planning process, planning system, and planning organization make up a centralised planning approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a longitudinal case study of IKEA's implementation of global supply chain planning. The literature review generated a framework which identifies prerequisites for, approaches to, and the effects of and obstacles to centralised supply chain planning. This framework was used to analyse IKEA's supply chain planning before and after the implementation. Finally, the authors reflected upon the learning from IKEA and refined the framework.

Findings

A number of prerequisites for centralised supply chain planning were identified: functional products, vertical integration, a dominating organization possessing the power and competence to enforce the implementation, and the use of one planning domain possessing all critical planning information. The direct effects of centralised supply chain planning were related to supply chain integration, standardisation, specialisation, and learning effects. Implementing centralised supply chain planning in an appropriate planning context led to several operational performance improvements. Obstacles were mainly related to human and organizational, as well as to software and data issues.

Research limitations/implications

This is a first approach towards development of a framework of how to design, use and benefit from centralised supply chain planning. The developed conceptual model, which is refined through the case study, offers some generalizability in researching centralised supply chain planning.

Practical implications

The findings show that centralised supply chain planning is a necessity for a large and growing, global supply chain striving for low‐cost production and efficiency.

Originality/value

IKEA is a unique case with its supply chain characteristics and recently implemented planning concept.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Martin Rudberg and Ola Cederborg

The main purpose is to describe and analyse the impact that the implementation of an advanced planning system (APS) has on the tactical planning level at a steel…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose is to describe and analyse the impact that the implementation of an advanced planning system (APS) has on the tactical planning level at a steel processing company. This is done in terms of analysing changes in the tactical planning processes, effects on company performance, and how the APS is used in a practical planning context.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on a longitudinal case study in the process industry. The case company, a high‐end steel producer, has been studied during several years using a combination of data sources: literature reviews, interviews, archival records, and also attendance at meetings, workshops, seminars, etc.

Findings

This case study points to the fact that implementing an APS and reorganizing the planning department and the planning processes are mutually dependent. The positive effects at the tactical planning level (in terms of service levels, fast and reliable order promises, more accurate forecasts) could not have been realized without the APS. On the other hand, the APS could not have been effectively utilized without the organizational change.

Research limitations/implications

The results presented in this paper are based on a single case study, but in the context of our literature review and other case studies the findings are still valid and an important step towards better understanding of the practical use of APSs.

Practical implications

The process descriptions, lessons learnt, and issues encountered in case studies like this should be helpful to practitioners on their way to implement APSs, and companies seeking new ways to improve their planning can use this research to investigate the use of an APS.

Originality/value

Studies on the practical use of standard APS software are still scarce. As such this paper provides enhanced knowledge and understanding on the use of APSs in industry settings.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Joakim Wikner and Martin Rudberg

Traditionally the customer order decoupling point (CODP) has focused mainly on the separation of production performed on speculation from commitment to customer orders…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally the customer order decoupling point (CODP) has focused mainly on the separation of production performed on speculation from commitment to customer orders. Engineering has, with few exceptions in this context, simply been viewed as occurring before production activities in a sequential manner. As competition increases, customer requirements for short lead‐times in combination with customisations requires further integration of processes involving both engineering and production activities making the traditional view of the CODP insufficient in these cases. The purpose of this paper is thus to provide a more general approach to enterprise integration of cross‐functional processes in order to extend the applicability of the CODP as a logistics oriented concept.

Design/methodology/approach

We use evolutionary approach to define the CODP as a two‐dimensional concept based on the integration of engineering and production.

Findings

The extended CODP captures the complexity in terms of possible configurations, but also provides a framework for the issues that must be handled when positioning the CODP in terms of both engineering and production simultaneously.

Practical implications

The two‐dimensional CODP is an important extension to make the theory better reflect reality and hence increase the scope and acceptance of both the concept CODP per se, and the analysis based on the CODP.

Originality/value

By the introduction of a new two‐dimensional approach, a more comprehensive CODP typology is defined. We also provide a classification of customer order influence based on a combined engineering and production perspective where the efficient CODPs constitute a set providing the highest level of customer value in terms of engineering adaptations.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Jan Olhager and Martin Rudberg

Whilst much of the e‐business evolution has been referred to as an additional and complementary marketing channel, there has been little concern about the impact on…

Abstract

Whilst much of the e‐business evolution has been referred to as an additional and complementary marketing channel, there has been little concern about the impact on manufacturing. However, since a manufacturing strategy should be closely linked to the marketing strategy, developments in marketing are likely to impact manufacturing. In this paper, we explore the ways in which e‐business is impacting the manufacturing strategy in manufacturing firms. We study seven Swedish manufacturing firms and investigate the relationship between e‐business and manufacturing strategy. The findings indicate that e‐business mainly affects two decision categories – vertical integration, and manufacturing planning and control systems – through new ways to communicate and exchange information between buyers and sellers at both business ends. Improvements in these decision categories lead to potential gains in delivery speed and reliability, but only for make‐to‐order companies, whereas the impact on quality, price and flexibility is more or less negligible. Make‐to‐stock firms report only limited impact on manufacturing.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Martin Rudberg, Niklas Klingenberg and Kristoffer Kronhamn

The purpose of this paper is to show how the functionality of electronic marketplaces can facilitate collaborative supply chain planning. Supply chain planning processes…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to show how the functionality of electronic marketplaces can facilitate collaborative supply chain planning. Supply chain planning processes are identified and analysed using a supply chain management focus. The paper also gives a brief introduction to a framework for supply chain management and to the typical structure of electronic marketplaces. Furthermore, three collaborative supply chain planning scenarios are defined, and it is shown how collaborative supply chain planning typically could be implemented on an electronic marketplace by the means of a Web‐based demonstration. As such, the paper shows how electronic marketplaces can be used to enable supply chain integration.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Jonathan Gosling, Bill Hewlett and Mohamed M. Naim

The customer order decoupling point (CODP) concept addresses the issue of customer engagement in the manufacturing process. This has traditionally been applied to material…

Abstract

Purpose

The customer order decoupling point (CODP) concept addresses the issue of customer engagement in the manufacturing process. This has traditionally been applied to material flows, but has more recently been applied to engineering activities. This later subject becomes of particular importance to companies operating in “engineer-to-order” (ETO) supply chains, where each order is potentially unique. Existing conceptualisations of ETO are too generic for practical purposes, so there is a need to better understand order penetration in the context of engineering activities, especially design. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to address the question “how do customer penetration concepts apply to engineering design activities?”

Design/methodology/approach

A collaborative form of inquiry is adopted, whereby academics and practitioners co-operated to develop a conceptual framework. Within this overarching research design, a focus group of senior practitioners and multiple case studies principally from complex civil and structural engineering as well as scientific equipment projects are used to explore the framework.

Findings

The framework results in a classification of nine potential engineering subclasses, and insight is given into order penetration points, major uncertainties and enablers via the case studies. Focus group findings indicate that different managerial approaches are needed across subclasses.

Practical implications

The findings give insight for companies that engage directly with customers on a one-to-one basis, outlining the extent of customer penetration in engineering activities, associated operational strategies and choices regarding the co-creation of products with customers. Care should be taken in generalising beyond the sectors addressed in the study.

Originality/value

The paper refines the definition of the ETO concept, and gives a more complete understanding of customer penetration concepts. It provides a comprehensive reconceptualization of the ETO category, supported by exploratory empirical research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Patrik Jonsson, Linea Kjellsdotter and Martin Rudberg

The purpose of this paper is to explore how standardized advanced planning systems (APS) can be used for solving planning problems at tactical and strategic levels, and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how standardized advanced planning systems (APS) can be used for solving planning problems at tactical and strategic levels, and to identify the perceived effects of using APS.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies involving three cases using APS software for strategic network planning and master production scheduling are conducted. Comparative analysis explores how the planning situation, the model design and use of the APS impact the perceived planning effects.

Findings

Findings show how APS support cost‐optimized strategic network design in one case and how efficiency, capacity utilization and delivery service problems were decreased in two cases using APS in global master planning processes. The cases show how APS supports cross‐functional integration and supply chain commitment to a common plan. Research directions are suggested about the feasibility of APS in situations with various planning complexities, how design of the optimization model creates complexity and affects the planning process, data gathering requirements when using APS, the role and design of the planning organization, and how to achieve positive planning effects, such as finding global optimum and single plan commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The approach is descriptive and explorative. Only three cases are studied.

Practical implications

The findings present experiences of APS usage and identify issues to consider when using APS and potential benefits to gain from usage.

Originality/value

The practical use of APS is low and the knowledge about how it impacts supply chain planning and performance is unexplored. The findings of this paper fill some of these gaps.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of 33