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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2010

Mary Jo Hatch

Stanford contributed significantly to the organizational culture movement that occurred in organization studies from 1970–2000. This chapter traces developments at…

Abstract

Stanford contributed significantly to the organizational culture movement that occurred in organization studies from 1970–2000. This chapter traces developments at Stanford and puts the contributions of its researchers and scholars in the context of the many influences that shaped the study of organizational culture during this period. In addition to the historical account, there is speculation about why the culture movement at Stanford more or less ended but might yet be revived, either by those studying institutionalization processes or by those who resist them.

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Stanford's Organization Theory Renaissance, 1970–2000
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-930-5

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Mary E. Boyce

The stories told in organizations offer researchers and organizational development practitioners a natural entry point to understanding and intervening in the culture(s…

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Abstract

The stories told in organizations offer researchers and organizational development practitioners a natural entry point to understanding and intervening in the culture(s) of an organization. Informed by perspectives of social constructivism, organizational symbolism, and critical theory, examines key studies of organizational story and storytelling, identifies multidisciplinary foundations, and presents challenges to the application of story work in organizations.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2010

Sim B. Sitkin

My own work reflects an attempt to understand organizational processes as, at their core, the process of pursuing or facilitating sense-making. Organizational members make…

Abstract

My own work reflects an attempt to understand organizational processes as, at their core, the process of pursuing or facilitating sense-making. Organizational members make sense of complex, changing conditions. Organizational systems and organizational leaders can be seen as serving the role of facilitating or impeding sense-making (Sitkin, Lind, & Siang, 2006).

Details

Stanford's Organization Theory Renaissance, 1970–2000
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-930-5

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

David M. Boje

Performance programs, games, rituals and story telling are lookedat as part of the performance of organization. Some leaders in thesemethods are gifted performers, and…

Abstract

Performance programs, games, rituals and story telling are looked at as part of the performance of organization. Some leaders in these methods are gifted performers, and they are able to pass on the plots of these themes to succeeding generations of employees.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 27 September 2014

Beau Breslin and Katherine Cavanaugh

The law in a liberal state is often a violent instrument. So said Robert Cover. Among those communities to which the law has been particular cruel are Native Americans…

Abstract

The law in a liberal state is often a violent instrument. So said Robert Cover. Among those communities to which the law has been particular cruel are Native Americans. Indeed, the traditions and practices of Native American tribes have spawned rich and fascinating narratives. Each tribe has created its own “nomos – its own normative universe” – with a distinct set of rules, expectations, and tenets. Even still, the state and federal governments have historically challenged Native American traditions and culture with various legal and judicial policies. Insofar as the state-imposed law is blunt and imprecise, certain Native American narratives are thus threatened. Over the past decade, several judicial cases have highlighted the clash between the state’s imperial authority and Native American narratives. Our chapter explores these court cases with an eye to the inevitable conflicts that emerge when law exists uneasily in a liberal state.

Details

Special Issue: Law and the Liberal State
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-238-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Joyce K. Fletcher

Examines the issue of unobtrusive power in organizations byapplying a poststructuralist lens to Lukes′ third dimension of power inorder to highlight the relationship…

Abstract

Examines the issue of unobtrusive power in organizations by applying a poststructuralist lens to Lukes′ third dimension of power in order to highlight the relationship between ideology, discourse and organizational experience. After identifying the advantages and limitations of this perspective, offers suggestions on how a poststructuralist view of power can inform organizational practice.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2022

Ursula Kilkelly and Emily Logan

Since the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, focus has shifted to its implementation at national level. In this regard, the UN Committee…

Abstract

Since the adoption of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, focus has shifted to its implementation at national level. In this regard, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child has recommended that every state party needs an independent human rights institution for children which should, whatever its form, be able independently to monitor, promote and protect children’s rights. Ireland established its Ombudsman for Children in 2004, with a founding law that gives the institution a wide range of powers associated with the duty to promote children’s rights. These include the express duty to advise Government, raise awareness, undertake research, and consult with children about matters that concern them. The Ombudsman for Children also has the power to receive complaints from children and investigate actions of public bodies that have adversely affected a child in areas of social and health services, child protection and education. This chapter considers the exercise by the Ombudsman for Children of these statutory powers against the backdrop of international standards on independent institutions for children. It illustrates how the Ombudsman for Children has advanced children’s rights in Ireland by taking a proactive and strategic approach to its legislative mandate, and notes in particular the role that soft power – derived from the Ombudsman’s independence, legitimacy and influence – has helped to maximize the potential of the institution.

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The Roles of Independent Children's Rights Institutions in Advancing Human Rights of Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-608-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Brian Abbott, Edmund Heery and Stephen Williams

This paper seeks to focus on civil society organizations (CSOs) and their capacity to exercise power in the employment relationship. In particular, the paper is concerned…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to focus on civil society organizations (CSOs) and their capacity to exercise power in the employment relationship. In particular, the paper is concerned with identifying the sources of power, how it is exercised and whether CSOs can exert pressure on other employment actors despite their apparent lack of resources possessed by more established representative structures.

Design/methodology/approach

Findings are based on 139 completed postal questionnaires and 47 interviews, primarily face‐to‐face, across 34 different CSOs.

Findings

Adopting a resource dependence framework suggests that CSOs have the capacity to exercise power and influence key employment actors. However, the power of CSOs is undermined by the absence of an internal organizational presence, making it difficult to mobilize workers.

Research limitations/implications

The research highlights the role of an often‐ignored employment actor. To provide further insights further research is needed to garner the views of other employment participants.

Originality/value

In employee relations discussions of workplace power have typically focused on the power of the state, employers and trade unions. This paper adopts a novel angle by exploring the role of CSOs and their ability to exercise power.

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Geraint Harvey and Peter Turnbull

This chapter discusses the power of trade unions within the UK civil aviation industry, focusing specifically on the British Air Line Pilots’ Association (BALPA) that…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the power of trade unions within the UK civil aviation industry, focusing specifically on the British Air Line Pilots’ Association (BALPA) that represents flight crew. The deleterious effects of the contemporary legislative and competitive environment of air transportation on the ability of BALPA to exact concessions from airline management are discussed as are the changes to the nature of work of flight crew that impact on the structural dimensions from which BALPA derives its power. These are weighed against the associational dimension of BALPA's power base, in particular the willingness of pilots to engage in active militancy. The chapter also considers possible organizing strategies for BALPA in order to challenge managerial prerogative in the industry.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-378-0

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

124

Abstract

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 71 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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