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Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2021

Nipa Saha

This chapter explores the development of advertising regulations governing food advertising to children in Australia since the 1940s. By introducing the advertising and…

Abstract

This chapter explores the development of advertising regulations governing food advertising to children in Australia since the 1940s. By introducing the advertising and marketing self-regulatory system, the Australian Government is taking a neoliberal approach, advocating for the free market to initiate and sustain the country’s economic development, instead of greater government regulation. By examining the primary and secondary literature, such as government reports and research, and newspaper and academic articles, this chapter outlines different regulatory initiatives adopted by both the government and food industry to limit food and beverage advertising to children on television and online, in order to prevent obesity rates increasing in children. This chapter synthesizes and critically evaluates food industry and public health studies, government and non-government reviews, and other research studies to evaluate the influence of self-regulation on Australian television food advertising within the neoliberal context since the 1990s. It contributes to the literature on food advertising regulations for children in Australia by offering evidence of how the government, public health authorities and the food industry have attempted to keep pace with changes in the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes. It identifies the loopholes that exist in these self-regulatory codes and concludes that Australia’s current advertising regulatory arrangements are failing to protect our children from unhealthy food marketing on television, especially on relatively under-regulated online platforms such as social media and branded websites. The issues identified in this chapter could aid the food and beverage industry, as well as the self-regulatory system, to offer comprehensive and applicable solutions to combat Australia’s obesity crises by implementing new legislations that align with different marketing practices.

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Media, Development and Democracy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-492-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Daniel A. Wren

Successful corporate turnarounds occur, thus avoiding liquidation, but historical examples are few. In late nineteenth century France Henri Fayol became managing director…

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Successful corporate turnarounds occur, thus avoiding liquidation, but historical examples are few. In late nineteenth century France Henri Fayol became managing director (CEO) of a vertically integrated iron and steel firm and made various decisions that retrieved the firm from the brink of liquidation. In examining his career, the competitive nature of the industry, and his decisions, it is suggested that he employed a deliberate and comprehensive corporate strategy to guide the firm toward its objectives. While he developed his theory of management from these experiences and claimed that its application was the primary cause of the turnaround, this paper suggests that there were several other factors at work.

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Management Decision, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Nicola Martin, Damian Elgin Maclean Milton, Tara Sims, Gemma Dawkins, Simon Baron-Cohen and Richard Mills

The Research Autism Cygnet Mentoring project was a two-year pilot study, completed in 2016, which aimed to develop, trial and evaluate a mentoring scheme designed with…

Abstract

Purpose

The Research Autism Cygnet Mentoring project was a two-year pilot study, completed in 2016, which aimed to develop, trial and evaluate a mentoring scheme designed with input from autistic people, their families and supporters. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The mentoring scheme involved 12 matched pairs (mentor/mentee) meeting once per week for one hour, over a six-month period. All mentors attended a training day, led by the principles of personal construct theory and an emancipatory research ethos. The project and training involved significant involvement of autistic people in both its design and delivery.

Findings

Participants on the autism spectrum found their mentoring experience very helpful in enabling them to progress towards self-identified goals, and mentees felt empowered by the person-centred ethos and the methods employed on the project. However, a number of aspects of the mentoring project have been identified that require further investigation, including: caution over offering mentoring without formal structures, boundary setting, supervision, flexibility and the matching of mentees with mentors.

Originality/value

The project has highlighted the potential benefits of time-limited goal-orientated mentoring and the negligible evidence base underpinning current mentoring practice with adults on the autism spectrum. In order for the project to realise its emancipatory aim, there is a need for a large-scale quantitative study and a health-economics analysis to provide the necessary evidence base for mentoring to be recommended as a cost-effective intervention with clear benefits for individual wellbeing.

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Advances in Autism, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1957

THE study of fatigue from a physiological aspect is a field which motion study technicians have made little or no attempt to explore. Shame on their heads. The…

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Abstract

THE study of fatigue from a physiological aspect is a field which motion study technicians have made little or no attempt to explore. Shame on their heads. The physiological simplification of motions aimed at reducing fatigue could have completely offset the notion that motion study is aimed at converting the operator into an automaton. It may well be that an elaborate motion pattern set‐up designed to simplify the work merely succeeds in setting up stresses in the worker. The superimposing of a time‐studied standard for the job may not have taken into account the adaptation of the speed of motions to the physiological limitations of the operator working at a high level performance. Very few practitioners have attempted to study motions in the factory with a view to reducing fatigue and stress as a prerequisite to studying the set‐up for increased production. Still fewer have attempted to evaluate these factors. It is about time they did.

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Work Study, vol. 6 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Beverly Dawn Metcalfe, Yasmeen Makarem and Fida Afouni

This chapter address how critical feminist organization studies can shed light on the dominance of masculinist logics in TM theorizing in both theory and practice and open…

Abstract

This chapter address how critical feminist organization studies can shed light on the dominance of masculinist logics in TM theorizing in both theory and practice and open up opportunities to review TM systems that stress inclusion and equity. The exclusive approach is most worrisome given that contemporary events such as the prosecution of Harvey Weinstein the global ‘#metoo campaigns and the Sustainable Development Goals have highlighted the importance of equality agendas. We draw on transnationalism, intersectionality and postcolonialism approaches to illustrate how TM reinforces inequalities. Our contribution questions the elite logics, and the white Global North males that dominate both TM theorizing, and TM practitioners and denies many stakeholders voices and contributions to organization life. We also question the longevity of the elite mantra of MNCs’ HRM policy given that the Sustainable Development Goals are increasingly being advocated by the business community, and contradict entirely an organizational ethic premised on valuing the elite.

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Managing Talent: A Critical Appreciation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-094-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Mary E. Boyce

The stories told in organizations offer researchers and organizational development practitioners a natural entry point to understanding and intervening in the culture(s…

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13648

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The stories told in organizations offer researchers and organizational development practitioners a natural entry point to understanding and intervening in the culture(s) of an organization. Informed by perspectives of social constructivism, organizational symbolism, and critical theory, examines key studies of organizational story and storytelling, identifies multidisciplinary foundations, and presents challenges to the application of story work in organizations.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Debra Hayes, Pam Christie, Martin Mills and Bob Lingard

This paper draws on a three‐year study of 24 schools involving classroom observations and interviews with teachers and principals. Through an examination of three cases…

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7056

Abstract

This paper draws on a three‐year study of 24 schools involving classroom observations and interviews with teachers and principals. Through an examination of three cases, sets of leadership practices that focus on the learning of both students and teachers are described. This set of practices is called productive leadership and how these practices are dispersed among productive leaders in three schools is described. This form of leadership supports the achievement of both academic and social outcomes through a focus on pedagogy, a culture of care and related organizational processes. The concepts of learning organisations and teacher professional learning communities as ways of framing relationships in schools, in which ongoing teacher learning is complementary to student learning, are espoused.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Bob Lingard, Debra Hayes and Martin Mills

This history of the politics of moves towards school‐based management in Queensland education is located within a broader historical and political analysis of such moves…

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2754

Abstract

This history of the politics of moves towards school‐based management in Queensland education is located within a broader historical and political analysis of such moves across Australia since the Karmel Report. This paper specifically focuses in on developments in Queensland. The Queensland analysis traces the moves from Labor’s Focus on Schools through the Coalition’s Leading Schools and the most recent Labor rearticulation in the document Future Directions for School‐based Management in Queensland State Schools. The analysis demonstrates that the concept of school‐based management has no stipulative meaning, but rather is a contested concept. More generally, the paper provides an account and analysis of new forms of governance in educational systems and the tension between centralising and decentralising tendencies as school‐based management is adopted in order to address a number of competing policy objectives.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Nada Korac‐Kakabadse and Alexander Kouzmin

Examines the “glass ceiling”, a putative invisible barrier but one that women experience as a very real impediment when vying for mobility, from a cultural perspective. In…

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933

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Examines the “glass ceiling”, a putative invisible barrier but one that women experience as a very real impediment when vying for mobility, from a cultural perspective. In the case of “ethnic”, “coloured” and aboriginal women, the barrier is more often than not more visible with “concrete‐like” qualities of opaqueness. Argues that traditional images, meanings, expectations, values, assumptions and beliefs embedded in organizations with predominantly male management cultures and psycho‐structures need to be audited and, subsequently, changed. Emphasizes the urgency for cultural change in organizational structures to prevent the further emasculation and marginalization of women and other disfranchised actors in favour of a cultural diversity that accommodates gender, ethnicity and other social differences in action imperative for innovation and globalization. Identifies strategies for obliterating glass and concrete ceilings and achieving gender‐ and ethnic‐based equity in career opportunities.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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