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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Martin MacKinnon

The Library Electronic Ordering (LEO) service, created by Stirling University Library, makes it possible to submit orders for library materials via the University's…

Abstract

The Library Electronic Ordering (LEO) service, created by Stirling University Library, makes it possible to submit orders for library materials via the University's intranet. Orders can be for any type of material and are received by the library as e‐mails then processed for ordering. The paper describes the web form creation, including the technical details of the form construction and method of processing.

Details

VINE, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Pamela J. Zelbst, Gregory V. Frazier and Victor E. Sower

Location decisions are among the most costly decisions that organizations make. This research aims to examine location decisions from a macro perspective and to utilize…

Abstract

Purpose

Location decisions are among the most costly decisions that organizations make. This research aims to examine location decisions from a macro perspective and to utilize findings for the development of a typology.

Design/methodology/approach

County level source information from the US Census Bureau, the United States (US) Department of Commerce: Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), National Association of Counties (NACO), and Fedstats is used in this analysis. Discriminant analysis as a profile analysis is utilized as an objective assessment of differences between the cluster concentrations.

Findings

The resulting typology of clusters concentrations is based on four constructs identified in the literature: innovation, specialization, complementariness and transfer of knowledge. This typology can serve as an aid in making these critical location decisions for practitioners as well as identifying future research topics for academia.

Research limitations/implications

The research is an exploratory study and limited by its nature; therefore cause and effect cannot be definitively stated. Variables such as politics, environment, geography and cultural differences could have confounding effects on the study. The generalizability of the study could be affected because of the geographic location in relationship to national differences based on these and other variables.

Practical implications

This typology of cluster concentrations can be used as a tool for managers when making crucial location decisions.

Originality/value

The research is original in that it takes a more holistic approach to developing a typology of cluster concentrations. Rather than looking at specific industries and focusing on industry clusters, the research focuses on concentrations of industry clusters.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 110 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Louise Rothnie

Campus wide information systems (CWIS) are the newest development in the electronic campus, providing information on many aspects of campus life. This article gives a…

Abstract

Campus wide information systems (CWIS) are the newest development in the electronic campus, providing information on many aspects of campus life. This article gives a brief overview of CWIS development in the United Kingdom as at summer 1993. As yet there is no definitive CWIS, so a range of third generation systems were looked at in detail at the Universities of Birmingham, Bradford and Stirling. Within each, attention is given to differences in organisational policy, functionality, software and information provision. An appraisal of the specific case studies was undertaken both onsite and remotely via a national gateway. A comparison of the systems draws out features that should be available on an ideal CWIS. Future developments, including the advent of standards such as X.500 and Z39.50 and the adoption of common software, will lead to greater interaction between institutions. All of this coupled with the development of hypermedia and multimedia will ensure CWISs will become a powerful tool in the provision of information.

Details

VINE, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Sarah K. Harkness and Amy Kroska

We examine whether self-stigmatization may affect the everyday social interactions of individuals with a diagnosed, affective mental health disorder. Past research…

Abstract

We examine whether self-stigmatization may affect the everyday social interactions of individuals with a diagnosed, affective mental health disorder. Past research demonstrates self-stigmatization lowers self-esteem, efficacy, and personal agency, leading to the likely adoption of role-identities that are at the periphery of major social institutions. We advance research on self-stigma by examining the likely interactional and emotional consequences of enacting either a highly stigmatized self-identity or a weakly stigmatized self-identity.

Using affect control theory (ACT), we form predictions related to the interactional and emotional consequences of self-stigmatization. We use the Indianapolis Mental Health Study and Interact, a computerized instantiation of ACT, to generate empirically based simulation results for patients with an affective disorder (e.g., major depression and bipolar disorder), comparing simulations where the focal actor is a person with a mental illness who exhibits either high or low levels of self-stigma.

Self-stigma is predicted to negatively influence patients’ behavioral expression, leading the highly self-stigmatized to enact behaviors that are lower in goodness, power, and liveliness than the weakly self-stigmatized. Their corresponding emotional expressions during these types of interactions are similarly negatively impacted. Even though these likely interactions are the most confirmatory for people with high levels of self-stigma, they lead to interactions that are behaviorally and emotionally more negative than those who have been better able to resist internalizing stigmatizing beliefs.

This piece has implications for the literature on the interactional and life course challenges faced by psychiatric patients and contributes to the self-stigma literature more broadly. This work will hopefully inform future research involving the collection of non-simulation-based data on the everyday interactional experiences of people with mental health problems.

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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Sarah K. Harkness, Amy Kroska and Bernice A. Pescosolido

We argue that self-stigma places patients on a path of marginalization throughout their life course leading to a negative cycle of opportunity and advancement. Mental…

Abstract

Purpose

We argue that self-stigma places patients on a path of marginalization throughout their life course leading to a negative cycle of opportunity and advancement. Mental health patients with higher levels of self-stigma tend to have much lower self-esteem, efficacy, and personal agency; therefore, they will be more inclined to adopt role-identities at the periphery of major social institutions, like those of work, family, and academia. Similarly, the emotions felt when enacting such roles may be similarly dampened.

Methodology/approach

Utilizing principles from affect control theory (ACT) and the affect control theory of selves (ACTS), we generate predictions related to self-stigmatized patients’ role-identity adoption and emotions. We use the Indianapolis Mental Health Study and Interact, a computerized version of ACT and ACTS, to generate empirically based simulation results for patients with an affective disorder (e.g., major depression and bipolar disorder) with comparably high or low levels of self-stigmatization.

Findings

Self-stigma among affective patients reduces the tendency to adopt major life course identities. Self-stigma also affects patients’ emotional expression by compelling patients to seek out interactions that make them feel anxious or affectively neutral.

Originality/value

This piece has implications for the self-stigma and stigma literatures. It is also one of the first pieces to utilize ACTS, thereby offering a new framework for understanding the self-stigma process. We offer new hypotheses for future research to test with non-simulation-based data and suggest some policy implications.

Details

50 Years After Deinstitutionalization: Mental Illness in Contemporary Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-403-4

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Furkan Amil Gur, Joshua S. Bendickson, Laura Madden and William C. McDowell

Disasters drastically affect regional industries; consequently, the study of regional resilience is of much interest to organizational researchers. To that end, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Disasters drastically affect regional industries; consequently, the study of regional resilience is of much interest to organizational researchers. To that end, this study examines the role of entrepreneurial opportunity recognition, stakeholder engagement, and elements of psychological recovery in the US Gulf Coast following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a qualitative content analysis of 183 industry-relevant articles published during and after the disaster, this study unpacks the most significant themes at work in the recovery process, including the psychological elements of the oil spill and its aftermath, the role of various internal and external stakeholders, and emerging opportunities for entrepreneurial activity in the region for regional resilience and recovery.

Findings

The nine themes that emerged from the data were captured in three categories mapped over time. Category one, psychogical states during and after the oil spill, include denial, coping, and recovery. Category two, regional recovery efforts and the role of stakeholders, includes the themes distractions, bargains, and material support. Category three, emerging opportunities, includes financial support, new markets, and reparations.

Originality/value

By mapping these themes over distinct time periods, this study identifies and explores patterns in the recovery period and use them to draw theoretical and practical implications.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Shanthi Johnson, Juanita Bacsu, Tom McIntosh, Bonnie Jeffery and Nuelle Novik

Social isolation and loneliness are global issues experienced by many seniors, especially immigrant and refugee seniors. Guided by the five-stage methodological framework…

Abstract

Purpose

Social isolation and loneliness are global issues experienced by many seniors, especially immigrant and refugee seniors. Guided by the five-stage methodological framework proposed by Arksey and O’Malley and more recently Levac, Colquhoun and O’Brien, the purpose of this paper is to explore the existing literature on social isolation and loneliness among immigrant and refugee seniors in Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a literature search of several databases including: PubMed; MEDLINE; CINAHL; Web of Science; HealthStar Ovid; PschyInfo Ovid; Social Services Abstracts; AgeLine; Public Health Database, Google Scholar and Cochrane Library. In total, 17 articles met the inclusion criteria.

Findings

Based on the current literature five themes related to social isolation and loneliness emerged: loss; living arrangements; dependency; barriers and challenges; and family conflict.

Research limitations/implications

Given the increasing demographic of aging immigrants in Canada, it is useful to highlight existing knowledge on social isolation and loneliness to facilitate research, policy and programs to support this growing population.

Practical implications

The population is aging around the world and it is also becoming increasingly diverse particularly in the high-income country context. Understanding and addressing social isolation is important for immigrant and refugee seniors, given the sociocultural and other differences.

Social implications

Social isolation is a waste of human resource and value created by seniors in the communities.

Originality/value

The paper makes a unique contribution by focusing on immigrant and refugee seniors.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Gender remains a politically charged and powerful ideological social identity dimension that categorically essentializes and reproduces opportunities and limitations in…

Abstract

Gender remains a politically charged and powerful ideological social identity dimension that categorically essentializes and reproduces opportunities and limitations in organizations. Addressed in Chapter 6 are assumptions about gender and ways that gender classifications and gender roles form and spill forth into both work and home life for an overlap of public and private spheres that disadvantage women and privilege men. Furthermore, femininity and masculinity constructs strengthen the power system that undergirds them, reinforces their meanings, and perpetuates behaviors, changing over time, across and within cultures, and over the life course.

In organizations, the glass ceiling metaphor has become a popular representation of inequality in the workplace for women, people of color and sexual minorities; a phenomenon expanded in recent years to include glass walls and glass cliffs to describe advancement barriers. Gender-neutral mindsets and blame-the-victim strategies found in organizations are examined, as well as the breadwinner role and intersectionalities of gender with social identity dimensions of age, ethnicity, and social class. Chapter 6 is divided into these subthemes: gender, roles, femininity, and masculinity; power and gender inequality at work, and effects on women; gender, parenting, and the second shift; the breadwinner role, hegemonic masculinity, and masculinity in crisis; gendered occupations and feminization of career fields; intersectionalities of gender with age, ethnicity, and social class; and shattering schemas with androgyny and transgenderism.

Details

International Perspectives on Equality, Diversity and Inclusion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-678-1

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2017

Eric E. Otenyo and Earlene A. S. Camarillo

This essay explores the reactions within police departments toward sexual harassment scandals. The study describes and analyzes reported cases of sexual harassment and…

Abstract

This essay explores the reactions within police departments toward sexual harassment scandals. The study describes and analyzes reported cases of sexual harassment and misconduct in police departments to discern citizen narratives and political consequences for elected officials. This assessment hypothesizes that political leadership is an essential element in establishing organizational cultures that combat sexual harassment in local governments. The article contributes to the knowledge about possible gaps in agenda setting, especially for a policy area in which knowledge and problem definitions continue to evolve.

Details

Corruption, Accountability and Discretion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-556-8

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Abstract

Details

Practical and Theoretical Implications of Successfully Doing Difference in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-678-1

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