Search results

1 – 10 of 14
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Martin Frischer, Graeme Ford and Rex Taylor

While there has been increasing recognition of the general proposition that the elderly are not a homogenous population there have been few attempts to delineate the…

Abstract

While there has been increasing recognition of the general proposition that the elderly are not a homogenous population there have been few attempts to delineate the characteristics of sub‐groups varying on dimensions of well‐being, such as health and psychological state. This may be due to the difficulty researchers have encountered in finding a rational basis for differentiating elderly people. However, there are also conceptual and methodological reasons which have contributed towards the neglect of this topic.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2014

Jakob Edler, Daniela Frischer, Michaela Glanz and Michael Stampfer

University governance is constantly challenged by changing expectations and contexts. New, prestigious and well-endowed funding schemes are one possible source of pressure…

Abstract

University governance is constantly challenged by changing expectations and contexts. New, prestigious and well-endowed funding schemes are one possible source of pressure for change of university governance. This article analyses the impact of one such scheme, the grants of the European Research Council (ERC), on the governance of European universities. After outlining a model of how this impact on universities can be expected to occur, we present the results of an exploratory study at a very early stage of the ERC’s existence (2010–2011). The empirical analysis is based on an investigation of 11 universities in eight countries, which shows that different kinds of universities are affected in varied and often unexpected ways, with particular differences arising at different levels within the universities.

Details

Organizational Transformation and Scientific Change: The Impact of Institutional Restructuring on Universities and Intellectual Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-684-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Chris Baumann, Hamin Hamin, Rosalie L. Tung and Susan Hoadley

The purpose of this eight-country study is to examine what drives performance at the individual worker’s level and compare the explanatory power of such drivers between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this eight-country study is to examine what drives performance at the individual worker’s level and compare the explanatory power of such drivers between emerging, newly developed and developed markets around the globe.

Design/methodology/approach

The study combines established behavioural theory developed in a Western context with three factors anticipated to be most relevant in Asia (competitive attitude, willingness to serve and speed) as drivers of workforce performance. Four thousand working and middle-class respondents from eight countries were sampled. The associations were tested using structural equation modelling, and workforce performance was measured using univariate analysis.

Findings

Three country clusters emerged from the research: emerging economies in Asia (Indonesia, India), where the three factors powerfully explain performance; “Confucian orbit countries” (China, Japan, Korea), where the factors explain 81-93 per cent; and highly developed Western countries (the USA, the UK, Germany), where the factors account for only 20-29 per cent.

Practical implications

As well as providing a framework for modelling workforce performance, particularly in Asian countries, the findings indicate that workforce performance should be incorporated in performance indexes. The findings as to which drivers best explain workforce performance in each country can inform workforce recruitment and management, as well as the location of businesses and outsourcing.

Originality/value

For the first time, the study addresses the anomaly between economic growth and development experienced by Asian countries and their relatively low rankings in global competitiveness indexes by making the link between workforce performance and country performance.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Henry A. Davis

Abstract

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2014

Abstract

Details

Organizational Transformation and Scientific Change: The Impact of Institutional Restructuring on Universities and Intellectual Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-684-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

John Corkery

Aims This paper examines (a) the relationship between notifications to the Home Office Addicts Index and deaths of notified addicts, and (b) the survival rates of such…

Abstract

Aims This paper examines (a) the relationship between notifications to the Home Office Addicts Index and deaths of notified addicts, and (b) the survival rates of such addicts.Design and participants Data came from the Home Office Addicts Index covering (a) notifications of opiate and cocaine addicts seeking treatment in the UK between 1966 and 1996, and (b) deaths of notified addicts between 1967 and 1996.Measurement Date of first notification; date of death; numbers of notifications in different times.Findings The proportion of addicts dying compared to the number of new notifications 20 years earlier rose from 2 to 7 in 10 between 1988 and 1993. There is constancy in the relationship between numbers of death and new notifications for up to 10 years before death. The proportion of the cumulative notified population dying between 1985 and 1993 remained consistent at 0.6% or 0.7%. The average length of time between first notification and death increased by six months between 1985‐90 and 1991‐96. Whilst the absolute number of deaths rose between 1984 and 1993, the proportion of newly notified addicts dying each year fell from 2.1% to 0.5%.Conclusions An increase in notifications was directly associated with a proportionate increase in addict deaths. One can expect the number of serious‐end drug users who die to increase with time, especially given the continuing role played by opiates ‐ chiefly heroin and methadone ‐ and increasingly cocaine in drug‐related deaths. At the same time, one can expect such individuals to survive for longer periods than did addicts in past decades.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Abstract

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1410-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 May 2008

Alexander D. Klose and Andreas H. Hielscher

This paper sets out to give an overview about state‐of‐the‐art optical tomographic image reconstruction algorithms that are based on the equation of radiative transfer (ERT).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to give an overview about state‐of‐the‐art optical tomographic image reconstruction algorithms that are based on the equation of radiative transfer (ERT).

Design/methodology/approach

An objective function, which describes the discrepancy between measured and numerically predicted light intensity data on the tissue surface, is iteratively minimized to find the unknown spatial distribution of the optical parameters or sources. At each iteration step, the predicted partial current is calculated by a forward model for light propagation based on the ERT. The equation of radiative is solved with either finite difference or finite volume methods.

Findings

Tomographic reconstruction algorithms based on the ERT accurately recover the spatial distribution of optical tissue properties and light sources in biological tissue. These tissues either can have small geometries/large absorption coefficients, or can contain void‐like inclusions.

Originality/value

These image reconstruction methods can be employed in small animal imaging for monitoring blood oxygenation, in imaging of tumor growth, in molecular imaging of fluorescent and bioluminescent probes, in imaging of human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, and in functional brain imaging.

Details

International Journal of Numerical Methods for Heat & Fluid Flow, vol. 18 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0961-5539

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1908

In considering this subject, it is desirable to consult, and to go by, official documents and any comments made thereon by competent and unprejudiced persons who are…

Abstract

In considering this subject, it is desirable to consult, and to go by, official documents and any comments made thereon by competent and unprejudiced persons who are recognised as authorities in their special line. In this connection it will be best to take, first, the text of the latest Imperial law as it stands (which is very explicit in regard to what is permitted and to what is not permitted to be done), secondly, the still more explicit official instructions as to how this law is to be carried out and enforced, and, thirdly, the comments of experts on the subject in some standard book intended for public guidance. Such a book is No. 68 of the well‐known Guttentag Law Series, edited by Doctors Lebbin and Baum.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 10 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Stuart A. Kinner

Prisoners experience high rates of chronic physical health problems, poor mental health and high rates of substance misuse. However, little is known about what happens to…

Abstract

Prisoners experience high rates of chronic physical health problems, poor mental health and high rates of substance misuse. However, little is known about what happens to prisoners after release from custody, except that many re‐offend and a disproportionate number die from drug overdose, suicide, accidents and other causes. Using a prospective design, 160 prisoners in Queensland, Australia were interviewed prior to release then 1 and 4 months post‐release. Most prisoners had a history of substance misuse and many reported poor mental health pre‐release. The prevalence of these problems was also high post‐release and there was a high degree of continuity of impairment. These findings add support to calls for (a) population‐level pre‐release planning and post‐release support for prisoners returning to the community, and (b) screening and targeted intervention for those most at risk of poor post‐release outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

1 – 10 of 14