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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Wei Wei and Asli D.A. Tasci

Although experiential consumption has received some attention from tourism and hospitality researchers in the past decade, the profile of experiential consumers has not…

Abstract

Purpose

Although experiential consumption has received some attention from tourism and hospitality researchers in the past decade, the profile of experiential consumers has not been discussed thus far. The purpose of this paper is thus twofold: to test the sociodemographic antecedents of experiential versus utilitarian consumption for profiling purposes and to examine the potential behavioral consequences of experiential versus utilitarian consumption tendencies.

Design/methodology/approach

On an online research platform, 413 respondents answered questions concerning logic-based/emotion-based decision-making traits, as well as sociodemographic characteristics and several travel behavior variables.

Findings

Data revealed that emotion-based decision makers are more likely to be females, who are more passionate about their travel needs than are logic-based decision makers. Results also revealed that the importance that emotion-based decision makers place on travel preferences, potential travel risks and travel information sources is higher than that of their logic-based counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

The current study used one personality trait, emotion-based decision-making, as a proxy for experiential consumption. There are other potentially explanatory traits that should be investigated in future studies.

Practical implications

Destination marketing organizations (DMOs) promoting destinations with historical and cultural attractions can capitalize on the finding that these attractions are highly demanded by both types of decision makers, whereas DMOs of man-made attraction destinations may need to find ways to embellish the significance of these attractions for both types of decision makers.

Social implications

Even though social risk was the lowest-rated item in general, both decision-making traits were highly correlated with social risk. The higher the tendency in the decision-making style, either logic-based or emotion-based, the more important how a trip would make them look within their social circle. Social risk concerns for both types of decision makers should be addressed in marketing messages.

Originality/value

The current study represents one of the earliest attempts to draw a picture of experiential consumers in comparison with utilitarian consumers in sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Pi‐Chuan Sun, Hsu‐Ping Chen and Kuang‐cheng Wang

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impacts of product harm, consumers' product knowledge and firms' negative information disclosure on ethical evaluation of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impacts of product harm, consumers' product knowledge and firms' negative information disclosure on ethical evaluation of a firm, especially, the moderating effects of product knowledge and negative information disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

A 3×2×2 between‐subject design with three levels of product harm, two levels of product knowledge, and two treatments of negative information was used in this study. The experimental product is diet food.

Findings

The findings reveal that the level of product harm affects consumers' ethical evaluation. Furthermore, the individual's ethical evaluation will influence his or her purchase intention. The main effect of subjective knowledge is significant while its moderating effect is not significant. It is also found that the negative information disclosure will lower consumer's ethical evaluation of a firm, and the effect of product harm on ethical evaluation will be stronger for harmful products than for harmless products when the negative information is disclosed.

Practical implications

Marketers might need to be especially responsive if their practices result in a diminished reputation for their firms and lost sales. Exploiting the vulnerability of consumers or worsening their situation by marketing harmful products might be evaluated as unethical under principles of justice. It is suggested that marketers include increased disclosures of actual product harm levels relative to industry norms.

Originality/value

Consumers' product knowledge and firms' negative information disclosure are integrated into the model, exploring the effect of product harm on consumer's ethical evaluation of a firm and their moderating effects are discussed.

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Iara Franchi Arromba, Philip Stafford Martin, Robert Cooper Ordoñez, Rosley Anholon, Izabela Simon Rampasso, Luis Antonio Santa-Eulalia, Vitor William Batista Martins and Osvaldo Luiz Gonçalves Quelhas

Product development process (PDP) in the context of Industry 4.0 may present several marketing implications. To understand these implications, the purpose of this study is…

Abstract

Purpose

Product development process (PDP) in the context of Industry 4.0 may present several marketing implications. To understand these implications, the purpose of this study is to identify the benefits and difficulties of Industry 4.0 related to the PDP and its impact in marketing strategies and operations.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used to perform this research was a systematic literature review. For this, five steps were followed, namely, research question formulation; studies location; studies selection and evaluation; analysis and synthesis; and reporting and use research results.

Findings

The systematic literature review considering PDP in Industry 4.0 context resulted in 28 benefits and 14 difficulties, in a total of 53 articles. From the analysis of these benefits and difficulties, several implications for marketing were identified, namely, better understand customer preferences; greater agility in marketing decision-making; better align marketing, product development and operations processes issues; better understand product/service lifecycle; analyze possibilities of new ways of distribution and communication channels; better define the value of products and services and location requirements.

Originality/value

The findings presented here can be used both by market professionals, interested in the subject and by researchers for future studies. The better understanding of PDP in the context of Industry 4.0 can enhance marketing strategies for market professionals and provide insights for researchers. No similar studies were found in the literature.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Mike Riley, Noora Kokkarinen and Michael Pitt

The purpose of this paper is to summarise the main post occupancy evaluation (POE) techniques currently available and illustrate which method would be the most appropriate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarise the main post occupancy evaluation (POE) techniques currently available and illustrate which method would be the most appropriate as a performance enhancement tool within higher education (HE) facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The history of, and barriers to using POE as a performance enhancement tool are analysed through an extensive literature review.

Findings

Despite a historic resistance to POE by construction professionals, interest has emerged in recent years, particularly with government clients and public funded projects, with a focus on the outputs of a project as opposed to the inputs. While plenty of methods exist, only a few are specifically suited to evaluate the building performance of educational facilities to maximise student success and productivity.

Research limitations/implications

Practitioners and academics who are interested in the various POE methods will find this review relevant in order to choose which method is most appropriate for the assessment needs of HE facilities.

Originality/value

Research on POE has been emerging in the field of facilities management for commercial and domestic buildings, but little attention has been drawn to HE buildings; although they are a great contributor to individual success and society. This paper provides an historic overview of POE while also assessing its scope, identifying drivers and barriers to it, and outlining the various methods by which it can be conducted.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Nicole Tiedemann, Marcel van Birgele and Janjaap Semeijn

The purpose of this paper is to investigate customer responsiveness in the hotel industry, and the role of market orientation including both internal and external…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate customer responsiveness in the hotel industry, and the role of market orientation including both internal and external information sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the supply chain management and marketing literature, a conceptual model was constructed and tested based on a survey of European hotel managers using PLS path modeling.

Findings

Market orientation seems to be an important basis for cross‐functional and inter‐organizational information sharing. Information exchange, both internal and external, can explain over 50 percent of customer responsiveness, as perceived by hotel managers.

Research limitations/implications

The study mainly focused on European four‐ and five‐star hotels. The final sample is considered representative, but relatively small (50 respondents). The observed importance of information sharing warrants further investigation.

Practical implications

While many hotel managers may focus on cleanliness, comfort of rooms, quality of food and friendliness, it seems that both internal and external information sharing are important antecedents of customer responsiveness, and hence satisfaction and loyalty.

Originality/value

This paper, by combining marketing and supply chain management concepts into one model, offers new insights into the hotel business. Customer responsiveness can be improved through market orientation and information sharing.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2007

Jerome D. Williams, William J. Qualls and Nakeisha Ferguson

A significant share of U.S. subsistence consumers is both poor and functionally low-literate. A key question that marketers and public policy makers must ask is how…

Abstract

A significant share of U.S. subsistence consumers is both poor and functionally low-literate. A key question that marketers and public policy makers must ask is how vulnerable these consumers are to the persuasiveness of marketing communications. We address this question by identifying who subsistence consumers in the United States are likely to be, exploring what it means to be vulnerable, with an emphasis on cognitive vulnerability; examining two theoretical frameworks for analyzing subsistence consumer vulnerability (elaboration likelihood model and persuasion knowledge model); and offering several propositions incorporating the select cognitive constructs of self-esteem, locus of control, and powerlessness.

Details

Product and Market Development for Subsistence Marketplaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-477-5

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Abstract

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

MICHAIL KAGIOGLOU, RACHEL COOPER, GHASSAN AOUAD and MARTIN SEXTON

The complexity of construction projects and the fragmentation of the construction industry undertaking those projects has effectively resulted in linear, uncoordinated and…

Abstract

The complexity of construction projects and the fragmentation of the construction industry undertaking those projects has effectively resulted in linear, uncoordinated and highly variable project processes in the UK construction sector. Research undertaken at the University of Salford resulted in the development of an improved project process, the Process Protocol, which considers the whole lifecycle of a construction project whilst integrating its participants under a common framework. The Process Protocol identifies the various phases of a construction project with particular emphasis on what is described in the manufacturing industry as the ‘fuzzy front end’. The participants in the process are described in terms of the activities that need to be undertaken in order to achieve a successful project and process execution. In addition, the decision‐making mechanisms, from a client perspective, are illustrated and the foundations for a learning organization/industry are facilitated within a consistent Process Protocol.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Catherine P. Killen and Robert A. Hunt

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of project portfolio management (PPM) capability evolution, in order to guide the implementation and ongoing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of project portfolio management (PPM) capability evolution, in order to guide the implementation and ongoing development of robust capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopts a dynamic capabilities perspective and draws on organizational learning theory to investigate the path‐dependent nature of PPM implementation and development. It employs a multiple‐case study of six organizations.

Findings

Each of the case organizations reported a high level of evolution and change within their PPM capabilities, both purposeful and unintended. Potential “fragilities” are identified, such as the emergence of a “success trap” that inhibits explorative innovation and difficulties in stopping poor projects to reallocate resources. Based on findings from the literature and the multiple‐case study, a capability maturity model is proposed to assist in the development of robust PPM capabilities that will continue to evolve and stay relevant in dynamic environments.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on six organizations and may not be representative of all environments. The proposed maturity model has only been used in initial trials to evaluate capability maturity, and its use in guiding capability development has not been studied. Further research is required to test and evolve the maturity model.

Practical implications

The maturity model will be of interest to managers as a tool to analyze PPM maturity and identify areas for further development or to guide new PPM implementations.

Originality/value

The proposed maturity model extends existing maturity models by incorporating organizational learning capabilities, by recognizing antecedents for maturity stages that build upon other capabilities, and by including steps to recognize and avoid potential “fragilities” and to ensure robust PPM performance over time.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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