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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Martin Caraher, Andrea Begley and Xavier Allirot

Abstract

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British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Martin Caraher, Paul Dixon, Roy Carr‐Hill, Paul Hayton, Hilary McGough and Lisa Bird

Investigates 1999/2000 health promotion activities in prisons in England and Wales and documents the range and quality of health promotion occurring in prisons, against…

Abstract

Investigates 1999/2000 health promotion activities in prisons in England and Wales and documents the range and quality of health promotion occurring in prisons, against which future activity might be measured. Finds that health promotion is under‐resourced and the concept and practice poorly understood. Health needs assessment tended to be analysis of and for health‐care services and, except in a minority of cases, did not include consultation with staff, prisoners or their families. Where responsibility was shared and the work based on multi‐disciplinary approaches, it seems more likely to have been reported accurately as health promotion activity. The official policy of a healthy settings/whole prison approach was not understood by many and its application was limited. The findings have informed the development of a new health promotion strategy for the prison service in England and Wales.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2009

Sarah Bowyer, Martin Caraher, Kay Eilbert and Roy Carr‐Hill

This paper aims to measure access to food in an inner London borough.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to measure access to food in an inner London borough.

Design/methodology/approach

There were six phases, which included designing food baskets, consultation with local residents and a shop survey. Recognising the cultural make‐up of the borough food baskets and menus were developed for four key communities, namely: White British, Black Caribbean, Turkish, and Black African. Three areas were identified for the study and shopping hubs identified with a 500‐metre radius from a central parade of shops.

Findings

The findings paint an intricate web of interactions ranging from availability in shops to accessibility and affordability being key issues for some groups. It was found that in the areas studied there was availability of some key healthy items, namely fresh fruit and vegetables, but other items such as: fresh meat and poultry, fish, lower fat dairy foods, high fibre pasta and brown rice were not available. Access was found to be defined, by local people, as more extensive than just physical distance to/from shops – for many shopping was made more difficult by having to use taxis and inconvenient buses. Small shops were important in delivering healthy food options to communities in areas of deprivation and were judged to offer a better range and more appropriate food than the branches of the major supermarket chains.

Research limitations/implications

The importance of monitoring the impact of shops and shop closures on healthy food availability is emphased. From a policy perspective the findings suggest that approaches based on individual agency need to be balanced with upstream public health nutrition approaches in order to influence the options available.

Originalty/value

The paper is arguably the first to examine and dissect the issue of food availability and accessibility in the inner London borough in question, especially in the light of its proposed redevelopment for the London Olympics in 2012.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Martine Stead, Martin Caraher, Wendy Wrieden, Patricia Longbottom, Karen Valentine and Annie Anderson

One of the many barriers to a healthier diet in low‐income communities is a presumed lack of practical food skills. This article reports findings from exploratory…

Abstract

One of the many barriers to a healthier diet in low‐income communities is a presumed lack of practical food skills. This article reports findings from exploratory qualitative research conducted with potential participants in a cooking skills intervention, in low income communities in Scotland. The research found widely varying levels of skill and confidence regarding cooking, supported the need for a community‐based intervention approach, and demonstrated the importance of consumer research to inform the content of interventions. Challenges the view that low income communities lack skills, suggesting that food skills should be defined more broadly than “cooking from scratch”. Other barriers to healthy eating, such as poverty, food access and taste preferences, remain important.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Martin Caraher, Paul Dixon, Tim Lang and Roy Carr‐Hill

This article uses data from the 1993 Health and Lifestyles Survey of England to present findings on how, why and when people use cooking skills; where and from whom people…

Abstract

This article uses data from the 1993 Health and Lifestyles Survey of England to present findings on how, why and when people use cooking skills; where and from whom people learn these skills. The implications for policy are explored. The survey data suggests that socio‐economic status and education are associated with the sources of people’s knowledge about cooking. The first or prime source of learning about cooking skills was reported to be mothers; cooking classes in school were cited as the next most important by the majority of correspondents, with some class and educational variations. The importance of mothers as sources of information on cooking skills is observed in all social classes. What emerges is a population unsure of specific cooking techniques and lacking in confidence to apply techniques and cook certain foods. Women still bear the burden of cooking for the household, with four out of every five women respondents cooking on most or every day, compared with one in five men. This may be related to the large number of men who claim to have no cooking skills (one in five).

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Rebecca Wells and Martin Caraher

– The purpose of this paper is to explore how British print media have reported the emergence of food banks in the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how British print media have reported the emergence of food banks in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses the news database Nexis and focuses on the period since the global financial crisis in 2007 in nine national UK print media titles. The search criteria included mention of the term food bank at least three times in the newspaper article and a UK focus. This resulted in 190 usable articles from the newspapers.

Findings

There were no UK-focused newspaper articles before 2008 and few until 2012 when the number increased dramatically. A key theme in reporting was increasing numbers of food banks and users of them. The data most often cited were from the Christian charity The Trussell Trust which runs a franchise system of food banks. There were clusters of newspaper articles indicating a common source. Few of the articles used direct quotes from current food bank users. A “frame contest” appeared in 2013/early 2014 with newspaper articles reporting both changes in welfare provision and the proliferation of food banks as the reason for the increase in food banks and food bank use. Tensions emerged between three key sets of players: government ministers, church leaders and The Trussell Trust as the key provider of food banks in England.

Research limitations/implications

The authors only examined newspapers, the reporting in other media may be different.

Practical implications

The media reporting of food poverty and the use of food banks has the potential to influence public perceptions and policy.

Originality/value

This is the first study to look at how food banks are reported by the media.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Martin Caraher, Heidi Baker and Maureen Burns

A series of consultations with eight‐ and nine‐year‐old children in three schools in England and Wales are set out. The aim of the consultation was to determine how…

Abstract

A series of consultations with eight‐ and nine‐year‐old children in three schools in England and Wales are set out. The aim of the consultation was to determine how children view the world of cooking and food. A technique called draw and write was used to ascertain the views of the young people. The reports from the children in this survey display a disparate food culture. The Wales and Herefordshire schools showed a greater propensity for chips and fried foods as the mainstay of many meals, but this inclination was less evident in the London school. Overall the research suggests a lot of commonality, but also differences between the schools in terms of how food culture is interpreted geographically.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Lisa Bird, Paul Hayton, Martin Caraher, Hilary McGough and Clive Tobutt

This paper presents the findings of an investigation into a mental health promotion initiative in young offender institutions across England. The study involved a survey…

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of an investigation into a mental health promotion initiative in young offender institutions across England. The study involved a survey of staff attitudes towards mental health promotion, and surveyed practice run by these staff. Analysis of staff descriptions of mental health promotion revealed a degree of confusion and a lack of clarity over the definition of mental health and mental health promotion. The concept of a mental health promotion initiative which aimed to improve the well‐being of the general inmate and staff population was not a shared vision and not part of the core work of either health care staff or prison officers. It is recommended that any future campaigns on mental health or health promotion should have a central lead, with some flexibility to allow for the development of local initiatives, fostering local relationships and partnerships.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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