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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Martin Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively analyse the inspection and regulation of care for people with learning disabilities and mental health problems in Scotland…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to qualitatively analyse the inspection and regulation of care for people with learning disabilities and mental health problems in Scotland, in two time periods.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses comparative historical research drawing on primary sources from 1857 to 1862 in the form of Annual Reports of the General Board of Commissioners in Lunacy for Scotland and associated papers, to compare inspection methods, quality standards and to identify persistent challenges to effective inspection.

Findings

Political, clinical and public awareness led initially to criticisms of existing care and eventually to the development of the “The Lunacy Act” of 1857. This Act resulted in the first attempts to set minimum standards of care for individuals at risk, with enforceable regulation. Some factors recur as challenges to effective practice in the inspection and regulation of care today.

Practical implications

There are problems of definition, reliable monitoring of quality standards and adequate, independent inspection of services that respond to unacceptable standards of care. There is a growing evidence base about best methods of inspection of services for people in care who are most at risk. These methods attempt to strike a balance between evidence- and value-based judgments. Perspectives from history may help focus resources.

Originality/value

This paper compares common and common challenges in two time periods to investigate what can be learned about the development of policy and practice in inspection and regulation of care.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Philip Miles

Abstract

Details

Midlife Creativity and Identity: Life into Art
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-333-1

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Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2014

SunWoo Kang and Nadine F. Marks

Guided by a life course theoretical perspective, this study aimed to examine associations between providing caregiving for a young or adult son or daughter with special…

Abstract

Purpose

Guided by a life course theoretical perspective, this study aimed to examine associations between providing caregiving for a young or adult son or daughter with special needs and multiple dimensions of physical health status among married midlife and older adults, as well as moderation of these associations by gender and marital quality (i.e., marital strain).

Method

Regression models were estimated using data from 1,058 married adults aged 33–83 (National Survey of Midlife in the U.S. (MIDUS), 2005).

Findings

Parental caregiving for a young or adult child with special needs (in contrast to no caregiving) was linked to poorer global health and more physical symptoms among both fathers and mothers. Father caregivers reported slightly more chronic conditions than noncaregiving men, regardless of marital quality. By contrast, mother caregivers reported a much higher number of chronic conditions when they also reported a high level of marital strain, but not when they reported a low level of marital strain.

Originality/value

Overall, results provide evidence from a national sample that midlife and older parents providing caregiving for a child with special needs are at risk for poorer health outcomes, and further tentatively suggest that greater marital strain may exacerbate health risks, particularly among married mother caregivers.

Details

Family Relationships and Familial Responses to Health Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-015-5

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Geoffrey Martin and Luis Gomez-Mejia

A growing volume of family firm literature has argued that the preservation of family socioemotional wealth takes precedence over the pursuit of financial goals. The…

Abstract

Purpose

A growing volume of family firm literature has argued that the preservation of family socioemotional wealth takes precedence over the pursuit of financial goals. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework that builds knowledge regarding the two-way relationship between socioemotional and financial forms of wealth, to develop a more complete theory of wealth concerns that may inform family firm decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conceptually examine contingencies affecting the relationship between financial and socioemotional wealth (in both causal directions).

Findings

The authors predict when one form of wealth (socioemotional/financial) is likely to dominate the other (financial/socioemotional) in the family firm’s strategic decisions.

Originality/value

The paper advances knowledge on the two-way relationship between socioemotional and financial forms of wealth providing a platform for further development in the nascent field of family business research, including our understanding of family firm decisions regarding control and influence over the family business, environmental policy, altruism toward family members, R&D, accounting choices and corporate diversification.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Stephen Campbell, Martin Roland and Brenda Leese

In April 1999, 481 English Primary Care Groups (PCGs) were created. The National Primary Care Research and Development Centre is leading a three year longitudinal study…

Abstract

In April 1999, 481 English Primary Care Groups (PCGs) were created. The National Primary Care Research and Development Centre is leading a three year longitudinal study, in conjunction with the King’s Fund, to track the development of PCGs. The implementation of clinical governance is an important responsibility of PCGs. This survey aimed to describe initial progress in implementing clinical governance in primary care, and to describe barriers to change. Data were collected in autumn 1999, using a questionnaire to clinical governance leads, in a random sample of 72 PCGs. PCGs have put considerable effort into the development of clinical governance and an extensive range of activities were planned for tracking quality of care. However, PCGs face barriers in implementing clinical governance and they must foster a culture of engaged participation by practices and practice staff. PCGs must also be given the time and resources needed to implement clinical governance.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Book part
Publication date: 2 December 2013

John Hamilton Bradford

To summarize and evaluate John Levi Marin’s recent book, The Explanation of Social Action (2011), the central thesis of which is that the actions of other people cannot be…

Abstract

Purpose

To summarize and evaluate John Levi Marin’s recent book, The Explanation of Social Action (2011), the central thesis of which is that the actions of other people cannot be explained without first understanding those actions from the point of view of the actors themselves. Martin thus endeavors to reorient social science toward concrete experience and away from purportedly useless abstractions.

Design/methodology/approach

This review chapter employs close scrutiny of and applies immanent critique to Martin’s argumentative claims, warrants, and the polemical style in which these arguments are presented.

Findings

This chapter arrives at the following conclusions: (1) Martin unnecessarily truncates the scope of sociological investigation; (2) he fails to define the key concepts within his argument, including “explanation,” “social action,” and “understanding,” among others; (3) he overemphasizes the external or “environmental” causes of action; (4) rather than inducing actions, the so-called “action-fields” induce experiences, and are therefore incapable of explaining actions; (5) Martin rejects counterfactual definitions of causality while defining his own notion of causality in terms of counterfactuals; (6) most of his critiques of other philosophical accounts of causality are really critiques of their potential misapplication; (7) the separation of experience and language (i.e., propositions about experience) in order to secure the validity of the former does not secure the validity of sociological inquiry, since experiences are invariably reported in language; and, finally, (8) Martin’s argument that people are neurologically incapable of providing accurate, retrospective accounts of the motivations behind their own actions is based on the kind of third-person social science he elsewhere repudiates; that he acknowledges the veracity of these studies demonstrates the potential utility of the “third-person” perspectives and the implausibility of any social science that abandons them.

Originality/value

To date Martin’s book has received much praise but little critical attention. This review chapter seeks to fill this lacuna in the literature in order to better elucidate Martin’s central arguments and the conclusions that can be reasonably inferred from the logical and empirical evidence presented.

Details

Social Theories of History and Histories of Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-219-6

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

María Encarnación Andrés‐Martínez, Miguel Ángel Gómez‐Borja and Juan Antonio Mondéjar‐Jiménez

This research involves a review of the principal aspects of the concept of perceived price fairness in consumer purchasing behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

This research involves a review of the principal aspects of the concept of perceived price fairness in consumer purchasing behaviour.

Design/methodology

The research reviews the principal aspects of perceived price fairness analysed in the literature. First, it tackles the dimensions of the concept of fairness before examining the dual entitlement principle, from which the idea of reference prices and the term fair price derive.

Findings

The research establishes research ideas for further research into this important topic, which is not currently the subject of much research.

Limitations/implications

The principal limitation of the research is that it only focuses on the consumer, without analysing the vendor's point of view in pricing. Additionally, it is limited to considering the effects of perceived unfairness on satisfaction. In future research it will be important to include aspects such as loyalty or confidence in the decision making process.

Originality/value

The research offers a thorough overview of the concept of perceived price fairness, proposing several future research areas that are better adjusted to the real‐world functioning of this important concept and should lead to improved understanding.

Objetivo

El objetivo de este trabajo es hacer una revisión de los principales aspectos relacionados con la percepción de justicia de precios en el comportamiento de compra del consumidor.

Diseño/metodología

Este trabajo revisa los principales aspectos relacionados con la percepción de justicia de precios analizados en la literatura. Así, en primer lugar se abordan las distintas dimensiones que componen el concepto de justicia, y en segunda instancia, el denominado principio de doble derecho que introduce el precio de referencia y da lugar al término de precio justo.

Hallazgos

Este trabajo plantea líneas de investigación futuras para profundizar en un tema tan importante, pero poco analizado en la actualidad.

Limitaciones/implicaciones

La principal limitación de este trabajo es que se centra solo en la perspectiva del consumidor sin analizar el punto de vista del vendedor cuando fija los precios. Además, se ha considerado únicamente los efectos que la percepción de injusticia tiene sobre la satisfacción, siendo interesante incluir elementos como la lealtad o la confianza en la decisión.

Originalidad/valor

Este trabajo aporta una visión integrada del concepto de percepción de justicia de precios, planteando una serie de líneas de investigación que pueden permitir un conocimiento mejor y más adaptado a la realidad de un concepto tan relevante.

Details

Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1012-8255

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Jesús M. Valdaliso, Edurne Magro, Mikel Navarro, Mari Jose Aranguren and James R. Wilson

– The purpose of this paper is to apply the path dependence theoretical framework to STI policies that support research and innovation strategies for smart specialisation (RIS3).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the path dependence theoretical framework to STI policies that support research and innovation strategies for smart specialisation (RIS3).

Design/methodology/approach

Review of the recent literature on the phases, sources of reinforcement and change mechanisms (layering, conversion, recombination, etc.) present in path-dependent processes, as well as the role played by mental frameworks, political agents and power relations; and its illustration and testing over 30 years of STI policy development in the Basque Country.

Findings

How to operationalise the analysis of continuity and change of STI policies supporting RIS3 policies characterised by path dependence processes. Likewise, learnings from the analysis of Basque case regarding the types of challenges that European regions will face as they design their RIS3, according to their degree of maturity in STI policies.

Originality/value

It is the first time that the recently developed tools for analysis of path-dependent processes are applied to the development of STI policies supporting RIS3 policies.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Martin Campbell and Dionne Chamberlin

This paper's aim is to evaluate understanding and knowledge of the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007 in a sample of community nurses working in learning…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to evaluate understanding and knowledge of the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007 in a sample of community nurses working in learning disability services in Scotland.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten community nurses who worked in learning disability services in one NHS area were tested at two time points, four months apart using a questionnaire designed for this study by researchers and practitioners. Level of previous national training in the Adult Support and Protection Act and length of time working with people with learning disabilities were recorded. Three domains of adult protection were included in the questionnaire: Principles of the Act and definitions; Adults at risk of harm; Protection, assessment, removal and banning orders.

Findings

Questionnaire scores varied widely overall and across the three domains. There was no correlation between individual scores and training or length of work experience. The level of knowledge was below what might have been expected for this group, given the level of training and experience. Carefully designed verification of the impact of nationally approved adult support and protection training is needed.

Originality/value

There is an absence of research in evaluating the impact of the approved Scottish Government training materials on staff knowledge and understanding of the 2007 Act, with staff attendance being taken as the main measure of training compliance. This was a small scale pilot study and recommendations are made for the scope and methods of evaluation.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Martin Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to measure nurses’ knowledge about Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007 before and after a one-day training course using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure nurses’ knowledge about Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007 before and after a one-day training course using participants’ favoured methods of training activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A repeated measures design was used to evaluate the impact of a one-day Adult Support and Protection training on pre-training knowledge of community nurses across one NHS area. Participants’ favoured methods of training activities were used in the training. Participants were community nurses working in learning disability, mental health, older people's services, acute services, substance misuse, and accident and emergency. All completed a training needs analysis and training preferences study. Individual and group scores on an Adult Support and Protection knowledge questionnaire were analysed pre- and post-training.

Findings

There was a statistically significant increase in scores post-training (Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test). Individual increases ranged from 2.5 to 27.5 per cent, with a mean score of 15 per cent. Evaluation of the impact of nationally approved Adult Support and Protection training is needed and training should take account of participants’ existing knowledge and preferred methods of training delivery to improve the transfer of learning into practice.

Research limitations/implications

Participants were self-selecting. Existing knowledge was not controlled for in the sample. No longitudinal follow up to measure retention of any improvements in knowledge. No control group. Training methods used were based on the expressed preferences of 40 nursing staff, but only 18 of these staff participated in the training day.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of research in evaluating the impact of the adult protection training on staff knowledge and understanding. Designing training activities and content to take account of participant preferences, and areas where knowledge is weakest may enhance the effectiveness of training in this area. This research was funded as a Queens Nursing Institute Community Project. It builds on a pilot project

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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