Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Yvette J. Lazdowski

Abstract

Details

Persistence and Vigilance: A View of Ford Motor Company’s Accounting over its First Fifty Years
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-998-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Stefanie E. Naumann, Nathan Bennett, Robert J. Bies and Christopher L. Martin

Research on layoff victims reports that interactional justice judgments influence important work‐related attitudes, such as organizational commitment. In this paper, we…

Abstract

Research on layoff victims reports that interactional justice judgments influence important work‐related attitudes, such as organizational commitment. In this paper, we build on this emerging literature through an examination of the role that both interactional justice and organizational support have in explaining the organizational commitment of 147 layoff victims at a major manufacturing plant. The results of structural equation analyses supported our hypothesis that organizational support mediates the relationship between interactional justice and organizational commitment.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

David M. Mayer and Maribeth Kuenzi

Purpose – This chapter highlights that we do not know why justice climate is related to various unit outcomes and proposes a number of mechanisms.

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter highlights that we do not know why justice climate is related to various unit outcomes and proposes a number of mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach – This chapter draws on the extant literature on justice climate, organizational climate, and a number of theories to link justice climate to unit outcomes.

Findings – We have little understanding of the mechanisms linking justice climate to unit outcomes and it is important to consider various mechanisms.

Research limitations/implications – The primary limitation of this chapter is that although we present several ideas for future research, we do not provide any new empirical findings. The primary implications have to do with specifying the theoretical mechanisms responsible for the effects of justice climate on unit outcomes.

Originality/value – The novel aspect of this chapter is that it questions why justice climate is related to several disparate outcomes and tries to take a theoretical approach to uncover the mechanisms.

Details

Fairness and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-162-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Quinetta M. Roberson and Ian O. Williamson

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the effects of team composition on justice climate strength. Specifically, we adopt a social network approach to…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the effects of team composition on justice climate strength. Specifically, we adopt a social network approach to justice in teams to explore the social-psychological mechanisms underlying diversity effects.

Design/methodology/approach – Using data from 80 self-managed project teams, we consider the impact of surface-level and deep-level diversity in teams on member social network ties and subsequently dispersion in their perceptions of procedural and interpersonal justice.

Findings – The results showed that diversity in team members’ psychological attributes – specifically, preferences for individualism – were associated with variability in members’ attachment to the team. In contrast, team gender and racial diversity were not significantly related to member social network ties. The results also demonstrated a relationship between network tie diversity and both procedural and interpersonal justice climate strength, such that variability in members’ attachment to the team was related to variability in their justice perceptions.

Overall, these findings demonstrate that teams characterized by higher levels of deep-level diversity may experience greater variability in their social interactions, which amplify variability in members’ justice perceptions.

Implications – Practically, these findings suggest that potential performance advantages of informational diversity in teams may come at a cost, as such diversity may reduce the quality of members’ justice experiences. Theoretically, they provide insight into the nature of the relationship between diversity and justice, which is largely dependent on the social psychological processes evoked by diversity. They also highlight team social networks as a useful means for examining such processes and understanding the operation of justice in teams.

Details

Fairness and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-162-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Mahfooz A. Ansari, Daisy Kee Mui Hung and Rehana Aafaqi

Building upon the “fair exchange in leadership” notion (Hollander; Scandura), the purpose of this paper was to hypothesize the mediating impact of procedural justice…

Abstract

Purpose

Building upon the “fair exchange in leadership” notion (Hollander; Scandura), the purpose of this paper was to hypothesize the mediating impact of procedural justice climate on the relationship between leader‐member exchange (LMX) and two attitudinal outcomes: organizational commitment and turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 224 managers voluntarily participated in the study. They represented nine multinational companies located in northern Malaysia. Data were collected by means of a structured questionnaire containing widely used scales to measure LMX (contribution, affect, loyalty, and professional respect), procedural justice climate, organizational commitment (affective, normative, and continuance), and turnover intentions. After establishing the goodness of measures, hypothesized relationships were examined using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). While commitment and LMX were, respectively, conceptualized as 3‐ and 4‐dimensional constructs, procedural justice climate and turnover intentions were each treated as unidimensional constructs.

Findings

Whereas hypotheses for direct effects received low‐to‐moderate support, the mediation hypothesis received substantial support only in the case of professional respect dimension of LMX.

Research limitations/implications

The study has obvious implications for leader‐member exchange and procedural justice in organizations. Though findings are in line with those in the past research, they should be viewed with caution – given the nature of cross‐sectional data.

Originality/value

Management needs to pay attention to the quality of LMX, as today's employees look for mutual trust.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Anna Saiti and Yiannis Papadopoulos

The purpose of this paper (based on the relevant literature) is to: investigate, through empirical analysis, primary school teachers’ perceptions regarding their job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper (based on the relevant literature) is to: investigate, through empirical analysis, primary school teachers’ perceptions regarding their job satisfaction, and examine whether or not the personal characteristics of primary school educators (such as gender, age, family status, educational level, and the total years of service in public primary education) have any impact on their job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 360 questionnaires were administered to primary school teachers in the metropolitan area of Athens (region of Attiki). The sample was randomly selected. The questionnaire was based on 41 closed and was divided into two sections. The Job Satisfaction Survey developed by Spector (1985) was implemented.

Findings

Greek school teachers are generally satisfied with their profession. There is no statistical correlation between personal characteristics and the overall satisfaction while indicated that teachers are more satisfied with three aspects (subscales) of job satisfaction, namely, “administration,” “colleagues” and “nature of work” and less satisfied with “salary,” “benefits” and “potential rewards.” Age correlates with the levels of satisfaction with reference to administration, potential rewards, colleagues and the nature of work. The overall satisfaction positively correlates with all nine aspects of job satisfaction (subscales) and gender affects the aspects of “promotion” and “colleagues.”

Research limitations/implications

This study only analyzes a small sample from the Athens region and hence the results cannot be used to generalize about the whole of Greece. Since other Greek regions operate in different socio-economic environments, an analysis of additional data from other regions (rural and urban areas) would be necessary to compare and confirm the results.

Originality/value

The findings of this study a valuable extension of other relevant research as it provides the first empirical study of the Greek school system, investigating the relationship between certain aspects of job satisfaction and the personal characteristics of school educators as well as the relationship between these aspects of job satisfaction and total satisfaction. In the context of efficient educational policy, a greater understanding of educators’ job satisfaction could facilitate the development of more effective policy practice that would increase not only the level of educators’ satisfaction, commitment and morale but also improve the performance of the school system.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Elizabeth E. Umphress and Adam C. Stoverink

Purpose – We offer a view of interpersonal justice climate in which the benefits of fair treatment might be stronger within some groups versus others, depending on…

Abstract

Purpose – We offer a view of interpersonal justice climate in which the benefits of fair treatment might be stronger within some groups versus others, depending on characteristics of the supervisor, the group, and the organization in which the group is embedded. We further identify a potential silver lining that may be associated with low interpersonal justice climate. Overall, our intent of this chapter is to offer a more nuanced view of the topic to enhance our understanding of interpersonal justice within groups.

Design/methodology/approach – We review literature on status to support our propositions.

Findings – We examine how a supervisor's idiosyncrasy credits, a group's status, and an organization's emphasis on hierarchy will moderate the relationship between unfair interpersonal treatment from a supervisor and the group's perceived interpersonal justice climate. Also, we suggest that low levels of interpersonal justice climate may actually lead to greater affiliation among group members and ultimately enhance perceptions of group cohesion.

Originality/value – Previous literature on justice climate has largely focused on procedural justice, whereas generally ignoring interpersonal exchanges between a group and its supervisor. This chapter contributes to research on justice at the group level by examining the potential moderating effects of status on the generation of interpersonal justice climate. Further, and in contrast to previous research, we offer a potential positive outcome that may result from low interpersonal justice climate.

Details

Fairness and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-162-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Deborah E. Rupp and E. Layne Paddock

Purpose – We outline a theoretical model of the emergence of justice climate in groups, teams, and organizations, and in doing so integrate multiple justice perspectives…

Abstract

Purpose – We outline a theoretical model of the emergence of justice climate in groups, teams, and organizations, and in doing so integrate multiple justice perspectives (e.g., affective events, fairness heuristic, deonance, justice integration, multifoci justice, overall justice).

Approach – In this theoretical paper, we propose that justice climate is spawned at the level of the event; individuals experience discrete events and then use their emotional reactions related to these events as information in forming fairness judgments. Cognitive processes explicated in justice integration theory, fairness heuristic theory, and fairness theory also play a role. Over time, these judgments about various perpetrators – which may include the evaluation of outcomes, procedures, information, and interpersonal treatment – are aggregated to form individual-level, stable judgments regarding the fairness of exchange partners with whom employees interact (e.g., supervisors, coworkers, and customers). Through socialization and social-information processing, and influenced by organizational structure and social networks, these individual multifoci justice perceptions merge to form multifoci justice climate, which over time lead to the formation of shared cognitions of overall justice climate.

Value – The chapter proposes a temporal model of how discrete events at the individual level merge to form individuals’ multifoci justice perceptions, shared multifoci justice climate, and ultimately overall justice climate. The chapter offers multiple propositions and concludes with recommendations for empirically testing the model.

Details

Fairness and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-162-7

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Jeanne M. Flavin and Richard R. Bennett

Over the past two decades, the growing number of women entering the police profession has challenged the historic male dominance of the occupation. Research from the USA…

Abstract

Over the past two decades, the growing number of women entering the police profession has challenged the historic male dominance of the occupation. Research from the USA and the UK has examined whether men and women police differ in their assessments of working conditions, occupational opportunities, and other aspects of police work. To date, however, no attempt has been made to conduct a quantitative study of gender across socio‐political contexts or to assess the applicability of models constructed in those two countries to Caribbean nations. This study employs survey data from a sample of police constables and their immediate supervisors in three Caribbean nations. The survey queried 1,237 constables and supervisors. A total of 11 per cent of the respondents were women. Constables were asked about various aspects of policing, working conditions, and the nature of their duties. The questions were based on 24 constructs evaluated in the US and UK literatures. Few differences between genders emerged from comparisons within nations, although such differences have been documented in the USA and UK. These findings suggest that gender models used in developed nations do not necessarily explain differences in developing nations. Differences were observed across the three nations, however. Implications for future research on gender and policing are discussed.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2009

Hafizah Mohamad Hsbollah, Kamil and Idris

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM) lecturers' perception of the decision regarding adopting e‐learning as a teaching tool.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM) lecturers' perception of the decision regarding adopting e‐learning as a teaching tool.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 244 lecturers in Universiti Utara Malaysia. Internal consistency using Cronbach alpha and exploratory factor analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted to confirm the measurement used. Logistic regression was run to examine factors influencing the adoption of e‐learning as a teaching tool among lecturers in UUM.

Findings

After performing reliability and validity tests of the instrument, only six factors were included in the framework out of nine factors affecting adoption. The research model showed a reasonably good fit with the data and empirical results confirm that only relative advantages, trialability and academic specialisation positively influence the adoption decision. Thus, the findings have provided evidence of the importance of relative advantages, trialability and academic specialisation in understanding the adoption decision before introducing new online technology and instructional delivery in education.

Research limitations/implications

The measurement of perception was accessed after the adoption process might contribute to post‐adoption experience, and the findings are limited to a specific sample that somewhat minimises the generalisability of the result. Future research should aim at examining the proposed framework in a broader range of public higher learning institutions that use e‐learning application in delivering knowledge.

Originality/value

The research provides a new perspective on lecturers' adoption of new technology and focuses on the substance of the instrumentation.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000