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Abstract

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article

Martijn Poel, Andrea Renda and Pieter Ballon

This paper aims to explain and demonstrate how business model frameworks can be used to understand market developments and to assess the role of policy in (multi‐sided

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain and demonstrate how business model frameworks can be used to understand market developments and to assess the role of policy in (multi‐sided) ICT markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach in the paper builds on integrated business model frameworks, which cover (much) more than the financial decisions of one single firm. A case study approach is implemented and tested in two studies on digital content platforms.

Findings

Relevant policy instruments are identified and explored. To some extent, the findings are complementary or contradictory to the findings of existing studies on digital content platforms. The paper includes policy recommendations related to mobile and fixed content platforms.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study are due to the explorative and qualitative approach, and are to be complemented by other approaches. Policy makers and researchers can use the approach to analyse digital content platform developments and the impact of policy. Stakeholders in innovation processes can use the approach to address business models as well as policy issues for emerging platforms and services.

Originality/value

The use of business model analysis in the context of policy analysis is a relatively new approach that is inspired by research findings on information communication technology (ICT) platforms and multi‐sided networks, progress in business model studies, challenges in the policy mix for ICT, and the importance of case study methods for impact assessment.

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Article

Martijn Poel, Linda Kool and Annelieke van der Giessen

ICT is everywhere, but information society policy cannot address all the sectors and policy issues in which ICT plays a role. This paper's aim is to develop an analytical

Abstract

Purpose

ICT is everywhere, but information society policy cannot address all the sectors and policy issues in which ICT plays a role. This paper's aim is to develop an analytical framework to assist policy makers in deciding on the priorities and coordination of information society policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytical framework is based on public management literature and innovation literature. The framework can be applied to individual ICT issues – when to lead, advise, explore or refrain from policy intervention. The framework consists of seven questions, including the rationale for intervention, stakeholders, the mandate of fellow policy makers (e.g. other ministries) and the costs, benefits and risks of intervention. The framework was applied in three cases.

Findings

A leading role for information society policy is most clear for e‐skills. For services innovation, several market failures and system failures appear to be relevant. This calls for a mix of policy instruments, with roles for several ministries. Policy coordination is crucial. For ICT in health sectors – and other public sectors – the conclusion is that information society policy can take the lead on cross‐cutting ICT issues such as privacy, standardisation and interoperability.

Originality/value

The article addresses one of the main challenges of information society policy: how to increase its scope, yet maintain effectiveness and coherence.

Details

info, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article

Martijn Poel and Linda Kool

The purpose of this paper is to explore how innovation has become more important in information society policy and what the implications are for policy design, policy

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how innovation has become more important in information society policy and what the implications are for policy design, policy coordination and policy evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

Against the background of European information society policy, a case study is done on the policy mix for ICT innovation in The Netherlands. A highly structured qualitative methodology is developed to analyse the relevant policy instruments in information society policy and innovation policy. The methodology includes a typology for rationale, policy instruments and element of the innovation process.

Findings

To a large extent, information society policy and innovation policy are complementary. There is some overlap between policy instruments. The rationale and objectives can be more explicit. The policy mix had a positive impact on information communication technology (ICT) knowledge, broadband and e‐government.

Originality/value

The paper presents the relevance, methods and results of a detailed study on the intersection of two policy fields: information society policy and innovation policy.

Details

info, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article

Marc van Lieshout, Linda Kool, Bas van Schoonhoven and Marjan de Jonge

The purpose of this paper is to develop/elaborate the concept Privacy by Design (PbD) and to explore the validity of the PbD framework.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop/elaborate the concept Privacy by Design (PbD) and to explore the validity of the PbD framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Attention for alternative concepts, such as PbD, which might offer surplus value in safeguarding privacy, is growing. Using PbD to design for privacy in ICT systems is still rather underexplored and requires substantial conceptual and empirical work to be done. The methodology includes conceptual analysis, empirical validation (focus groups and interviews) and technological testing (a technical demonstrator was build).

Findings

A holistic PbD approach can offer surplus value in better safeguarding of privacy without losing functional requirements. However, the implementation is not easily realised and confronted with several difficulties such as: potential lack of economic incentives, legacy systems, lack of adoption of trust of end‐users and consumers in PbD.

Originality/value

The article brings together/incorporates several contemporary insights on privacy protection and privacy by design and develops/presents a holistic framework for Privacy by Design framework consisting of five building blocks.

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Article

Katleen Janssen

This paper aims to address the recent trends and developments relating to the re‐use of public sector information (PSI) and open government data.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the recent trends and developments relating to the re‐use of public sector information (PSI) and open government data.

Design/methodology/approach

It starts from the European Commission's Digital Agenda, which stressed the importance of opening up access to content to promote the single market. While the 2003 PSI directive has contributed to this, barriers to the re‐use of PSI still remain, often based on a lack of awareness with public sector data holders and users. Some of these barriers are currently being challenged by the open government data (OGD) movement. While this movement has comparable objectives to the PSI directive, it is based on different arguments. This raises the question of how the two approaches relate.

Findings

The paper argues that the proponents of the re‐use of PSI and OGD should join forces to promote the availability of public sector data.

Originality/value

In this way, the public sector can be encouraged to rethink its information policy and move to a more coherent view on how data can be used to increase the benefits for the information society and the market for digital content.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article

Eva Lievens

The purpose of this article is to present the preliminary results of a research project which aspires to identify requirements for risk‐reducing regulatory strategies

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present the preliminary results of a research project which aspires to identify requirements for risk‐reducing regulatory strategies aspiring to protect children and young people in social networks. It aims to provide an insight into the changing role of law in today's networked society and the innovative regulatory solutions that will be able to deal with the paradigm shift from mass media and passive, vulnerable consumers to media for mass self‐communication and active “prosumers”.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the legal impact of social networking sites (SNS) risks for children and young people that have been identified in social science research is assessed, as well as the applicability of existing legal instruments. Second, legal trends in this field and a number of recent (alternative) regulatory initiatives and their implementation are discussed. In a final part, the use of such alternative regulatory instruments and their compliance with the broader legal (human rights) framework are analysed. To conclude, a number of elements for risk‐reducing regulatory strategies for the protection of minors in online social networks are identified.

Findings

The first research results point towards the importance of multi‐stakeholder involvement, proportionality of measures, procedural guarantees (such as transparency) and the careful combination of regulatory strategies targeted at illegal as well as harmful conduct and content risks for a balanced protection of minors in social networks.

Originality/value

Although social networks are very popular among young users, the risks that are associated with these networks are not at all or not appropriately addressed by existing legal or regulatory instruments. This article aims to contribute to developing innovative regulatory instruments which are effectively addressing these risks.

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Article

Paschal Preston and Jim Rogers

Digital technological innovations are commonly perceived to be radically disrupting the power or role of corporate actors within the music industry and their established

Abstract

Purpose

Digital technological innovations are commonly perceived to be radically disrupting the power or role of corporate actors within the music industry and their established industrial practices and interests. In particular, the internet is widely regarded as having produced a “crisis” for the music industry. While such assumptions reflect the predominance of technological deterministic thinking in relation to the music industry, this paper aims to draw upon historical insights from past research on radical technical innovation processes to inform this approach to examining some of the key innovations that have occurred in the music industry in the digital era.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on a range of qualitative data obtained primarily from a recently completed Irish‐based music industry research project, primarily comprised of interviews conducted with key music industry informants and personnel.

Findings

Key findings indicate that ongoing legal innovations, combined with the widespread adoption of social networking sites and other online content platforms are (amongst other factors) serving to maintain and bolster the position of major music copyright owners.

Originality/value

In the context of the contemporary “knowledge economy”, the authors propose paying special attention to one specific area of policy innovation – that related to the intellectual property rights (IPRs) regime. In particular, they place emphasis on the copyright strand of IPRs in shaping the outcome of digital platforms for the promotion and dissemination of music. In doing this, they consider the evolution of a re‐configured music industry “structure” which re‐conceptualises the music artist as an “all‐encompassing bundle” of rights through which a diverse range of revenue streams are increasingly streamlined back to a small handful of major copyright owners.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article

Natali Helberger

The purpose of this paper is to make suggestions of how to improve the legal standing of consumers of digital content products.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make suggestions of how to improve the legal standing of consumers of digital content products.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis in this paper is based on desk research and comparative legal research, among others in the context of research performed in the context of a grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and, in parts, on a study performed for the European Commission by Loos et al.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that the legal and technical complexities of digital content products and the resulting lack of a clear notion of which product characteristics are still reasonable and normal can result in uncertainty for consumers and businesses, or even a lower level of protection for digital content consumers, as compared to consumers of more conventional products. In order to improve the protection of digital content consumers, defaults for the main functionalities and characteristics of digital content products may be needed. The article describes possible routes to create such defaults and concludes with suggestions for the way forward.

Originality/value

The article suggests a new approach to improving the legal standing of digital consumers, one that takes into account the situation of digital consumers as well as the need for flexibility and room for innovation for digital content businesses. It is based on extensive legal and comparative research into the present legal framework and develops a new approach of conceptualizing the legal obstacles that digital consumers can be confronted with.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article

Jo Pierson and Rob Heyman

The advent of Web 2.0 or so‐called social media have enabled a new kind of communication, called mass self‐communication. These tools and the new form of communication are

Abstract

Purpose

The advent of Web 2.0 or so‐called social media have enabled a new kind of communication, called mass self‐communication. These tools and the new form of communication are believed to empower users in everyday life. The authors of this paper observe a paradox: if this positive potential is possible, the negative downside is also possible. There is often a denial of this downside and it is especially visible in social media at the level of privacy and dataveillance. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate this point through an analysis of cookies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper illustrates how mass self‐communication in social media enables a new form of vulnerability for privacy. This is best shown by redefining privacy as flows of Personal Identifiable Information (PII) that are regulated by informational norms of Nissenbaum's concept of contextual integrity. Instead of analysing these contexts on a general level, the paper operationalises them on the user level to illustrate the lack of user awareness regarding cookies. The results of the research were gathered through desk research and expert interviews.

Findings

The positive aspects of cookies, unobtrusiveness and ease of use, are also the main challenges for user privacy. This technology can be disempowering because users are often hardly aware of its existence. In that way cookies can obfuscate the perceived context of personal data exposure.

Originality/value

The research shows how user disempowerment in social media is often overlooked by overstressing their beneficial potential.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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