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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Martha C. Cooper and John T. Gardner

Suggests that the concepts of partnerships and strategic alliancesare increasingly emphasized in literature and “real life”,which might lead managers to believe that…

Abstract

Suggests that the concepts of partnerships and strategic alliances are increasingly emphasized in literature and “real life”, which might lead managers to believe that partnership‐style relationships, as opposed to arm′s length relationships, are necessary for a firm to compete successfully. Explores why, how, and when to establish a wide range of possible business‐to‐business relationships. The inter‐organizational relationship literature suggests six reasons for forming relationships: necessity, asymmetry, reciprocity, efficiency, stability, and legitimacy. Compares this framework with six partnership characteristics based on the partnership‐building literature: planning, sharing of benefits and burdens, extendedness, systematic operational information exchange, operating controls, and corporate culture bridge building. Suggests that firms should concentrate on how to develop “good business relationships”, which may have varying levels of partnership characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

Randolph M. Russell and Martha C. Cooper

Addresses a number of issues relating to determining whetherproducts should be ordered independently and therefore shipped as asingle‐product order, or co‐ordinated and…

Abstract

Addresses a number of issues relating to determining whether products should be ordered independently and therefore shipped as a single‐product order, or co‐ordinated and shipped as a group, or multiproduct, order from a single source. Factors which might influence the decision include the level or volume of demand, the distribution of demand across products, the weight of items and the attractiveness of the quantity discount offered. Uses an optimal inventory‐theoretic model, that incorporates transport weight breaks and quantity discounts, to assess when product orders should be combined and what products should be ordered separately. The effects of these decisions on the order interval, the number of order groupings, the proportion of items ordered independently, the proportion of attractive discounts forgone in favour of consolidation, and the relative cost savings, are examined using an extensive set of simulated data that are based on a firm in the automobile industry supply chain.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Martha C. Cooper and Lisa M. Ellram

The concepts of a supply chain and supply chain management are receiving increased attention as means of becoming or remaining competitive in a globally challenging…

Abstract

The concepts of a supply chain and supply chain management are receiving increased attention as means of becoming or remaining competitive in a globally challenging environment. What distinguishes supply chain management from other channel relationships? This paper presents a framework for differentiating between traditional systems and supply chain management systems. These characteristics are then related to the process of establishing and managing a supply chain. A particular focus of this paper is on the implications of supply chain management for purchasing and logistics.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Martha C. Cooper, Douglas M. Lambert and Janus D. Pagh

Practitioners and educators have variously addressed the concept of supply chain management (SCM) as an extension of logistics, the same as logistics, or as an…

Abstract

Practitioners and educators have variously addressed the concept of supply chain management (SCM) as an extension of logistics, the same as logistics, or as an all‐encompassing approach to business integration. Based on a review of the literature and management practice, it is clear that there is a need for some level of coordination of activities and processes within and between organizations in the supply chain that extends beyond logistics. We believe that this is what should be called SCM. This article proposes a conceptual model that provides guidance for future supply chain decision‐making and research.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Lisa M. Ellram and Martha C. Cooper

The Supply Chain Management (SCM) concept has received much attention as a method for achieving improved customer service, better inventory management, and better overall…

Abstract

The Supply Chain Management (SCM) concept has received much attention as a method for achieving improved customer service, better inventory management, and better overall channel management. Keiretsu, a type of Japanese business network shares many of the goals of SCM, yet is implemented much differently. This paper explores the similarities and differences between SCM and Keiretsu approaches. It also discusses broad changes that are required to make SCM a more viable competitive alternative among western firms.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1998

Douglas M. Lambert, Martha C. Cooper and Janus D. Pagh

In 1998, the Council of Logistics Management modified its definition of logistics to indicate that logistics is a subset of supply chain management and that the two terms…

Abstract

In 1998, the Council of Logistics Management modified its definition of logistics to indicate that logistics is a subset of supply chain management and that the two terms are not synonymous. Now that this difference has been recognized by the premier logistics professional organization, the challenge is to determine how to successfully implement supply chain management. This paper concentrates on operationalizing the supply chain management framework suggested in a 1997 article. Case studies conducted at several companies and involving multiple members of supply chains are used to illustrate the concepts described.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Britta Gammelgaard, Satish Kumar, Debidutta Pattnaik and Rohit Joshi

International Journal of Logistics Management (IJLM) celebrated 30 years of its publication in 2019. This study provides a retrospective overview of the IJLM articles…

Abstract

Purpose

International Journal of Logistics Management (IJLM) celebrated 30 years of its publication in 2019. This study provides a retrospective overview of the IJLM articles between 1990 and 2019.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied bibliometrics to study and present a retrospective summary of the publication trends, citations, pattern of authorship, productivity, popularity depicting influence, and the impact of the IJLM, its contributors, their affiliations, and discusses the conceptual layout of IJLM's prolific themes.

Findings

With 23 yearly articles, IJLM contributed 689 specialized research papers on Supply Chain Management (SCM) by 2019. Authorship grew by 42 new contributors adding up to 1,256 unique IJLM authors by 2019. Each of its lead contributors associated with 1.55 other authors to contribute an article in the journal among which 93% are cited at least once. Survey-based research dominated in last 30 years. The h-index of the journal is 73 while its g-index suggests that 133 IJLM articles were cited at least 17,689 times in Scopus. IJLM authors affiliated to the Cranfield University and the US contributed the highest count of articles. Bibliographic coupling analysis groups IJLM articles into eight bibliographic clusters while network analysis exposes the thematic layout of IJLM articles.

Research limitations/implications

The literature selection is confined to the Scopus database starting from 1990, a year before the inception of the IJLM, thereby limiting its scope.

Originality/value

This study is the first retrospective bibliometric analysis of the IJLM, which is useful for aspiring contributors.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1990

Lisa M. Ellram and Martha C. Cooper

The paper begins with an overview of some of the forces that have shaped supply chain management and partnership relationships. Next the potential benefits and risks of…

Abstract

The paper begins with an overview of some of the forces that have shaped supply chain management and partnership relationships. Next the potential benefits and risks of involvement in supply chain management/partnership relationships are discussed from the perspective of both the shipper and the service provider (warehousers and transportation firms). Results from a major survey of shippers, warehousers and transportation providers are used to illustrate the risks and benefits. Means of minimizing the potential risks are also suggested. The paper concludes with a discussion of issues in supply chain management that would benefit from further analysis and research. These issues include determination of whether a firm should use a supply chain management approach, the management structure to use in supply chain management, and modelling supply chain management systems.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Amit K. Ghosh and Martha C. Cooper

Canadian and United states managers identified NAFTA‐related benefits and threats. These factors were related to the managers' overall perceptions of the effect of NAFTA…

Abstract

Canadian and United states managers identified NAFTA‐related benefits and threats. These factors were related to the managers' overall perceptions of the effect of NAFTA on firm performance. Results indicated that NAFTA's perceived benefits include increased access to the Mexican market and to other Latin American markets, improved customs procedures, and increased effectiveness and efficiency in logistics. However, managers were concerned about inefficiencies in logistics and customs procedures, currency fluctuations, and differences in culture and business practices. Managers with little experience in Mexico had lower estimates of NAFTA's potential benefits, the barriers to trade in Mexico, and NAFTA's potential positive impact on their firm's performance. They also believed that NAFTA's primary influence on firm performance arises from the increased access to Latin American markets, while barriers in Mexico were discounted. The view of experienced managers was balanced: NAFTA's benefits were weighed against Mexico's drawbacks. Access to the Mexican market was important, but not as important as logistics‐related benefits.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

François Fulconis and Gilles Paché

The majority of studies on supply chain management (SCM) emphasize the importance of cooperative relationships for improving the integration of business processes into a…

Abstract

The majority of studies on supply chain management (SCM) emphasize the importance of cooperative relationships for improving the integration of business processes into a supply chain. It seems accepted that SCM will be a source of competitive advantage if, and only if, firms that participate in it formalize a strategic partnership between each other beforehand. This article questions whether this really is the case, given that the corporate cultures currently in place are largely founded on a tradition of adversarial relationships, the creation of large groups and the development of vertical concentrations. SCM could, in contrast, in such a case be the catalyst for powerful future strategic partnerships that could gently break arm’s‐length competition.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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