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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Martha C. Andrews, K. Michele Kacmar and Matthew Valle

The purpose of this paper is to explore surface acting as a mediator in the relationships between perceptions of organizational politics and personality, with stress…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore surface acting as a mediator in the relationships between perceptions of organizational politics and personality, with stress, turnover intentions, and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained via survey from 276 working adults, and responses were subjected to structural equation modeling to confirm the measurement model and test hypotheses.

Findings

Surface acting was found to mediate the relationships between perceptions of organizational politics and intent to turnover and satisfaction, and between proactive personality and intent to turnover and satisfaction. No mediating effect for surface acting was found between agreeableness and the outcomes.

Practical implications

Individual differences and situational contingencies do affect surface acting in the workplace, and individual work-related outcomes. Managers need to be aware of personality characteristics and situational contexts that impact surface acting in organizations to help understand the effects of potential divergent attitudes and behaviors on employee outcomes.

Originality/value

Previous research examining surface acting assessed behavior in light of employee-customer interactions. This research extends the study of surface acting by examining the mediating role of surface acting among new predictors including organizational politics, proactive personality, and agreeableness with stress, turnover intentions, and job satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Matthew Valle, Martha C. Andrews and K. Michele Kacmar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of procedural justice, training opportunities and innovation on job satisfaction and affiliation commitment via the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of procedural justice, training opportunities and innovation on job satisfaction and affiliation commitment via the mediating effect of organizational identification. The authors also explored the moderating role of satisfaction with supervisor on the relationship between the antecedents and organizational identification as well as its moderating effect on the mediational chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used structural equation modeling techniques, using MPLUS 7.4, to analyze data collected from 247 full-time employees who were recruited by undergraduate students attending a private university in the Southeast region of the USA.

Findings

Results demonstrated that the indirect effects for procedural justice and training opportunities as predictors were significant, while none of the paths for innovation as a predictor were significant. Satisfaction with supervisor moderated the relationships between procedural justice and organizational identification and innovation and organizational identification.

Originality/value

This research expands the nomological network concerning antecedents and consequences of organizational identification. It also explores the role of satisfaction with one’s supervisor, as this can affect identification with the organization. This research provides support for the notion that stronger employee–organization relationships lead to positive individual and organizational outcomes.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Dawn S. Carlson, K. Michele Kacmar, Merideth J. Thompson and Martha C. Andrews

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of four impression management (IM) tactics as mediators to help job incumbents manage the impressions others have…

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1031

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of four impression management (IM) tactics as mediators to help job incumbents manage the impressions others have regarding the spillover of the incumbent’s family domain onto the work domain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined the data from 296 matched job incumbents and coworkers. The authors tested a structural equation model and alternative models to find the best fit and subsequently tested both direct and indirect effects.

Findings

The authors found that family-to-work conflict related to job-focused and supervisor-focused IM behaviors, and family-to-work enrichment related to self-focused, coworker-focused and supervisor-focused IM behaviors. Supervisor-focused IM served as a mediator to the job incumbent’s attitude (job satisfaction) while job-focused, self-focused and coworker-focused IM served as mediators to the job incumbent’s behavior (job performance).

Practical implications

The research is important in that just as employees do not “leave work at the office,” they also do not “leave family at home.” Instead, experiences in the two domains affect one another in ways that are beneficial and harmful. Understanding the role that IM plays in this process adds insight into the spillover of family onto work.

Originality/value

The authors extend both the work-family and IM literatures by looking at potential family domain antecedents to engaging in IM behaviors and their impact on work life.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Sharon L. Segrest, Martha C. Andrews, Scott W. Geiger, Dan Marlin, Patricia G. Martinez, Pamela L. Perrewé and Gerald R. Ferris

Acts of interpersonal influence are observed throughout organizations, and most typically, in direct supervisor–subordinate relationships. However, researchers have…

Abstract

Purpose

Acts of interpersonal influence are observed throughout organizations, and most typically, in direct supervisor–subordinate relationships. However, researchers have focused less on subordinates bypassing the chain of command and targeting their supervisor's supervisor with influence attempts. We conceptualize a new term, “leapfrogging,” as subordinates' attempts to influence and manage the impressions of their supervisor's supervisor. Here we focus on influencing the target's perception of likability (the focus of ingratiation) and competence (the focus of self-promotion). This study focuses on its personal and situational antecedents.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the central role of social exchange and psychological processes within this phenomenon, we build on a social exchange and a social cognition approach. Using a sample of 131 university support personnel service employees, hierarchical regression is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The following antecedents of leapfrogging are hypothesized and tested: the subordinate personal characteristics of Machiavellianism, need for achievement, and fear of negative evaluation, and the situational/relational characteristic of leader–member exchange (LMX). Of these potential antecedents, subordinate Machiavellianism and LMX were the strongest predictors, and subordinates' need for achievement and fear of negative evaluation were moderate predictors.

Practical implications

Leapfrogging occurs when actors are frustrated with their current situation and desire change. However, influence tactics aimed at a subordinate's supervisor's supervisor may further strain a low-quality leader–subordinate relationship. As actors become increasingly dissatisfied and leave, this may result in increased organizational costs related to the loss of experienced employees and the hiring and training of new ones.

Originality/value

Most upward influence research has largely ignored subordinate influence attempts that go outside of the normal chain of command and target their boss's boss. The present study addresses this gap in the literature by examining leapfrog behaviors. Although acknowledged in a limited manner as a legitimate organizational behavior, this topic has received virtually no empirical attention.

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Amine Abi Aad, Martha C. Andrews, Jamal T. Maalouf, K. Michele Kacmar and Matthew Valle

Abusive supervision research has clearly demonstrated its many negative effects. The present study uses social learning theory to shed light on mechanisms that could…

Abstract

Purpose

Abusive supervision research has clearly demonstrated its many negative effects. The present study uses social learning theory to shed light on mechanisms that could potentially alter the negative effect of abusive supervision.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 162 full-time employees, we identify and test two potential variables that we believe may moderate, or soften, the trickle-down negative effects of abusive supervision.

Findings

Results demonstrates that coworker support moderates the positive relationship between abusive supervision and coworker incivility such that this relationship is weaker when coworker support is high. In addition, we found that work engagement moderates the positive relationship between coworker incivility and turnover intentions such that this relationship is weaker when engagement is high. Next, we found that coworker incivility mediates the positive relationship between abusive supervision and turnover intentions and that this indirect effect is moderated by both coworker support and work engagement.

Originality/value

We combined three theoretical explanations, social learning theory, contagion effect and the trickle-down perspective, to theoretically argue not only how (through coworker incivility) but when (when coworker support and work engagement are low) abusive supervision impacts turnover intentions. In addition, we extended the research on work engagement by positioning it as a boundary condition. We found that when individuals are engaged in their work, the environment in which they work matters less (because the work matters more).

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Martha C. Andrews, Thomas Baker and Tammy G. Hunt

This study seeks to explore the relationship between corporate ethical values and person‐organization fit (P‐O fit) and the effects on organization commitment and job…

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6515

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the relationship between corporate ethical values and person‐organization fit (P‐O fit) and the effects on organization commitment and job satisfaction. Further, it aims to examine the construct of moral intensity as a moderator of the P‐O fit‐commitment relationship as well as the P‐O fit‐job satisfaction relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 489 members of the National Purchasing Association in the USA, a structural model was examined in which it was hypothesized that corporate ethical values would be positively related to person‐organization fit and P‐O fit in turn would be positively related to commitment and job satisfaction. It was further hypothesized that the outcomes associated with P‐O fit would be moderated by moral intensity such that high moral intensity would strengthen the P‐O fit outcomes relationships.

Findings

All of the hypotheses were supported.

Research limitations/implications

All data stem from one data source, introducing the possibility of mono‐source bias. Additionally, all scales use self‐reports, introducing the possibility of mono‐method bias.

Practical implications

These results highlight the importance of corporate ethical values and moral intensity in building and maintaining an ethical and committed workforce.

Originality/value

The findings of this study contribute to the ethics and P‐O fit literature by establishing a link between corporate ethical values and P‐O fit. It further construes moral intensity as a subjective variable based on the perceiver rather than an objective characteristic of ethical issues. Moral intensity was found to strengthen the relationships between P‐O fit and satisfaction and P‐O fit and commitment.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Martha C. Andrews, K. Michele Kacmar and Charles Kacmar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of mindfulness as a predictor of the two components of regulatory focus theory (RFT): promotion and prevention focus. It…

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2634

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of mindfulness as a predictor of the two components of regulatory focus theory (RFT): promotion and prevention focus. It further examines promotion focus and prevention focus as mediators of the mindfulness-job satisfaction and mindfulness-turnover intentions relationships. Finally, job satisfaction is also examined as a mediator of the mindfulness-turnover intentions relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested using data collected via a snowball approach. Online surveys were distributed to undergraduate students enrolled in a business course. Students were then given the opportunity to earn extra credit by sending the survey to potential respondents. The relationships were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Support was found for four of the six hypotheses. Prevention focus did not negatively mediate the relationship between mindfulness and job satisfaction as well as the relationship between mindfulness and turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

One limitations of this research is the placement of mindfulness as an antecedent to promotion and prevention focus. Another plausible alternative is to consider mindfulness as a consequence. An additional limitation is the use of a snowball sampling technique. Future research should examine these findings using employees of a single organization.

Originality/value

This research theoretically and empirically links RFT and mindfulness. This study also adds to the limited research empirically linking RFT and turnover intentions, both directly and indirectly via job satisfaction. Finally, this research extends previous research that established the positive relationship between mindfulness and job satisfaction by examining the mindfulness-job satisfaction-turnover intentions relationship.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

David D. Dawley, Martha C. Andrews and Neil S. Bucklew

The purpose of this paper is to provide an examination of the relative impact of mentoring, supervisor support, and perceived organizational support on organizational…

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6797

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an examination of the relative impact of mentoring, supervisor support, and perceived organizational support on organizational commitment and job search behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 346 employees of a US manufacturing facility were surveyed.

Findings

Ordinary least squared regression model revealed that perceived organizational support was a stronger predictor of organizational commitment and job search behavior than was mentoring and supervisor support.

Research limitations/implications

The main implication of this study for leadership theorists is that while mentors and supervisors can be effective in endearing the employee to the organization, the perception of organizational support might be more important. The main limitation of this study is that the findings are derived from a single manufacturing organization.

Practical implications

The results from this study suggest that organizational leaders must adequately address organizational‐supported programs including fair operating procedures, rewards, and job conditions. These programs underlie perceived organizational support.

Originality/ value of paper

This paper contributes to the literature by providing a concurrent and comparative examination of the effects of mentoring, supervisor support, and perceived organizational support on organizational commitment and job search behavior.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

David. D. Dawley, Martha C. Andrews and Neil S. Bucklew

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of mentoring on the relationships between perceived organizational support, supervisor support, and job fit on…

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1743

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of mentoring on the relationships between perceived organizational support, supervisor support, and job fit on turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains the topics, provides background and discussion of the main concepts. The study uses regression analyses to test the moderating relationships using a total sample of 610 employees split among three separate organizations.

Findings

The results suggest that mentoring becomes more effective in reducing turnover intentions as employees experience increasing levels of perceived organizational support, supervisor support, and job fit.

Practical implications

The results suggest mentoring can be beneficial to both organizations and individuals. Organizations benefit by improving employee retention. Likewise, individuals benefit through strengthened relationships provided by mentoring and the associated positive outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper makes a contribution to the literature by being among the first to examine mentoring as a potential moderator in the context of perceived organizational support, supervisor support, job fit, and turnover intentions.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Matthew Valle, Micki Kacmar and Martha Andrews

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of ethical leadership on surface acting, positive mood and affective commitment via the mediating effect of employee…

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1466

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of ethical leadership on surface acting, positive mood and affective commitment via the mediating effect of employee frustration. The authors also explored the moderating role of humor on the relationship between ethical leadership and frustration as well as its moderating effect on the mediational chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in two separate surveys from 156 individuals working fulltime; data collections were separated by six weeks to reduce common method variance. The measurement model was confirmed before the authors tested the moderated mediation model.

Findings

Ethical leadership was negatively related to employee frustration, and frustration mediated the relationships between ethical leadership and surface acting and positive mood but not affective commitment. Humor moderated the relationship between ethical leadership and frustration such that when humor was low, the relationship was stronger.

Research limitations/implications

Interestingly, the authors failed to find a significant effect for any of the relationships between ethical leadership and affective commitment. Ethical leaders can enhance positive mood and reduce surface acting among employees by reducing frustration. Humor may be more important under conditions of unethical leadership but may be distracting under ethical leadership.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates how frustration acts as a mediator and humor serves as a moderator in the unethical behavior-outcomes relationship.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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