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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

E.G. Sieverts, J. Figdor, S. Bakker and M. Hofstede

In this series, specifications, properties and test results of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are listed and compared. This article is…

Abstract

In this series, specifications, properties and test results of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are listed and compared. This article is devoted to the previously defined category of end‐user software, sometimes also referred to as bibliographic formatting software. Eight different programs have been tested and assessed: Archivist, BIB/Search, Library Master, Notebook II, Papyrus, Pro‐Cite, The Ref‐Filer and Reference Manager. All programs run under MS‐DOS, though there are also Apple Macintosh versions for Pro‐Cite and Reference Manager. For each of the eight programs about 100 facts and test results are tabulated. All the programs are individually discussed as well.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Eric G. Sieverts and Marten Hofstede

The more than 3700 data presented in the tables of preceding articles in this series, pertaining to 37 different software packages for information storage and retrieval…

Abstract

The more than 3700 data presented in the tables of preceding articles in this series, pertaining to 37 different software packages for information storage and retrieval (ISR), may seem overwhelming to the reader who needs to make a well‐founded choice. To make this task easier, some general questions can be asked with respect to the required ISR application. These questions can be summarised as: What sort of information? How much? For whom? For what purpose? At what cost? The discussion about user needs, typical applications and lists of demands centres around these five basic questions in relation to the categories of retrieval software which were identified in the six earlier articles. They cover the whole range from bibliographic software to advanced full‐text retrieval software.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Eric G. Sieverts and Marten Hofstede

In this first article of a series, several categories of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are distinguished and characterised: (1) classical…

Abstract

In this first article of a series, several categories of microcomputer software for information storage and retrieval are distinguished and characterised: (1) classical retrieval systems, (2) end‐user software, (3) indexing programs, (4) full‐text retrieval programs, and (5) personal information managers. In addition, the special retrieval techniques of hypertext and best‐match searching are discussed. The 20‐odd programs which will be assessed in subsequent articles are characterised according to these categories. As an introduction to the coming comparison and assessment, a systematic listing and discussion of properties and functions of ISR software is presented.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Wouter Mettrop and Paul Nieuwenhuysen

An empirical investigation of the consistency of retrieval through Internet search engines is reported. Thirteen engines are evaluated: AltaVista, EuroFerret, Excite…

Abstract

An empirical investigation of the consistency of retrieval through Internet search engines is reported. Thirteen engines are evaluated: AltaVista, EuroFerret, Excite, HotBot, InfoSeek, Lycos, MSN, NorthernLight, Snap, WebCrawler and three national Dutch engines: Ilse, Search.nl and Vindex. The focus is on a characteristics related to size: the degree of consistency to which an engine retrieves documents. Does an engine always present the same relevant documents that are, or were, available in its databases? We observed and identified three types of fluctuations in the result sets of several kinds of searches, many of them significant. These should be taken into account by users who apply an Internet search engine, for instance to retrieve as many relevant documents as possible, or to retrieve a document that was already found in a previous search, or to perform scientometric/bibliometric measurements. The fluctuations should also be considered as a complication of other research on the behaviour and performance of Internet search engines. In conclusion: in view of the increasing importance of the Internet as a publication/communication medium, the fluctuations in the result sets of Internet search engines can no longer be neglected.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Hohjin Im and Chuansheng Chen

This study sought to examine the relation of cultural practices and values with favoritism and nepotism/cronyism. Additionally, this study's purpose was also to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to examine the relation of cultural practices and values with favoritism and nepotism/cronyism. Additionally, this study's purpose was also to examine how trust mediates the relation between culture and favoritism.

Design/methodology/approach

Correlations were used for exploratory investigation into the bivariate relations between culture and favoritism and nepotism/cronyism across 97 cultures. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were then conducted to examine the cultural correlates of favoritism and nepotism/cronyism holding all other variables constant. Lastly, partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to examine the mediating role of societal levels of trust.

Findings

Bivariate correlations showed that collectivism, familism, uncertainty avoidance, and power distance are positive correlates of both favoritism and nepotism/cronyism. Institutional collectivism, future orientation and trust, on the other hand, were negative correlates of favoritism and nepotism/cronyism. Uncertainty avoidance and trust were key correlates of favoritism while familism and future orientation were key correlates of nepotism/cronyism. Trust fully mediated the relation between culture and favoritism but did not mediate the relation between culture and nepotism/cronyism.

Originality/value

This study adds to the current body of literature on culture and favoritism. Notably, the findings regarding different key cultural correlates with respect to favoritism and nepotism/cronyism provide valuable implications for expanding our understanding of the psychological and social nuances of favoritism. Specifically, favoritism in transactions and interactions with those not bound by social commitment relationships may be explained by beliefs while interactions with those with social relationships (e.g., family and friends) may be explained by preferences.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Ann Mitsis and Patrick Foley

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally‐anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally‐anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Culturally diverse business students (n=548) studying at an Australian university were surveyed using previously established scales. Multivariate analysis was used to test six hypotheses.

Findings

High uncertainty avoidance explained unique variation in the six dependent variables analysed using OLS regressions. These dependent variables were: goals, generic skills, good teaching, intellectual motivation, learning community and learning resources. Each of these variables identified different dimensions of a students' university education experience. High collectivism also explained unique variation for all except for goals. High masculinity only explained unique variation for learning resources. Age only produced a unique variance explanation for good teaching, and gender did not produce any. Nevertheless, most of the six independent variables had significant zero‐order correlations with the six dimensions of university experience examined in this study.

Research limitations/implications

Changes in business students' perceptions over time is a limitation of this study, as it was an exploratory cross‐sectional one.

Practical implications

This study's findings may help universities improve their relationship with their total student population by recognising the non‐homogeneous nature of this business student cohort, especially their culturally‐anchored values.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that it may be both possible and useful to identify different student customer segments based on students' culturally‐anchored value orientations, which may be valuable to universities in their efforts to attract, retain and grow an ongoing relationship with students, especially international full‐fee paying students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2022

Kemi Ogunyemi, Omowumi Ogunyemi and Amaka Anozie

Ecology is a word commonly used in many circles with a focus on the environment and human interactions with it. Human ecology as a concept studies human interaction with…

Abstract

Ecology is a word commonly used in many circles with a focus on the environment and human interactions with it. Human ecology as a concept studies human interaction with the environment in different cultures. Human cultural backgrounds differ and the way the traditional beliefs influence human activities varies from place to place. In entrepreneurship, traditional values can play a role as they often shape the character of practitioners. In the quest for sustainable development, one cannot underestimate the influence of these cultural tenets in shaping the dynamics of the practitioners’ activities. This chapter explores the role of African cultural beliefs, philosophies in cultivating principled entrepreneurship. It presents some traditional values that influenced the mindset of entrepreneurs in the past towards ethical work. These tenets guided the dynamics of trade and responsible management of resources for the benefit of one’s community and of oneself.

Details

Responsible Management in Africa, Volume 2: Ethical Work and Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-494-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2017

Suraksha Gupta

Intentions of managers of pharmaceutical multinational enterprises (MNEs) to adopt business strategies, which will aid global health and wellbeing, are in some ways linked…

Abstract

Intentions of managers of pharmaceutical multinational enterprises (MNEs) to adopt business strategies, which will aid global health and wellbeing, are in some ways linked with their understanding of the returns that their company will receive from these investments. However, the MNE’s managers are unaware of business strategies that will allow them to link their business activities with the corporate objectives of contributing to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Pharmaceutical companies are moving toward monopolistic practices by acquiring local companies for manufacturing purposes or by engaging local companies in contract manufacturing and directing the focus of these companies away from innovation and toward profit making. At the same time, pharmaceutical MNEs are promoting global health and wellbeing as their SDGs. This study uses knowledge from existing sources and expert insights to explain the returns that MNEs can get from their investments related to global health and wellbeing. One of the important recommendations from the ethical point of view is engaging local firms in the innovation process; from the marketing perspective, this study recommends the use of a corporate brand and not a product brand for offering generic medicines. The operations perspective explains how MNEs can incorporate the social agenda into their mainstream business strategies. Limitations of the study are discussed, and avenues for future research are explained.

Details

Multinational Enterprises and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-163-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2021

Anh Dang and David Raska

This paper aims to summarize peer-reviewed journal articles on national cultures and electronic word of mouth (eWOM) behavior, identify the main findings and patterns…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to summarize peer-reviewed journal articles on national cultures and electronic word of mouth (eWOM) behavior, identify the main findings and patterns among those studies and discuss research gaps that need to be addressed in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review process was utilized to analyze peer-reviewed journal articles on both eWOM and national cultures. The main research questions were defined, then proceeded by the identification of exclusive and inclusive criteria to search for relevant articles, which were further filtered based on abstracts and full texts, and then scrutinized for main findings and major variables such as countries, cultural variables and data collection methods.

Findings

An analysis of 52 papers shows that national cultures, primarily Hofstede's dimensions, influence the willingness of individuals to share eWOM, how they write eWOM and the extent to which they use eWOM to make decisions. Although the reviewed studies have provided insightful implications for marketing theory and practice, the present paper has identified a number of important questions that warrant future research attention.

Originality/value

eWOM is continually being employed as a popular source of information for consumers throughout different countries to make their purchase decisions. However, eWOM behavior differs from country to country due to national cultures, and managers' eWOM strategies that work in one country may not be applicable in another. Therefore, there has been an increasing interest in this topic. Nevertheless, it remains unclear which subjects have been addressed and what areas are yet to be investigated. This paper presents a comprehensive review of how national cultures affect eWOM behavior by drawing upon prior research and provides directions for future research contributions.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Eugenie A. Samier, Eman ElKaleh and Waheed Hammad

This chapter provides a critical and comprehensive review of the internationalisation literature. It starts with a brief discussion of the main factors and features that…

Abstract

This chapter provides a critical and comprehensive review of the internationalisation literature. It starts with a brief discussion of the main factors and features that need to be considered when internationalising the educational administration and leadership field. This is followed by a critique of the internationalisation of education and the many challenges that hinder the achievement of proper internationalisation. The third section provides an overview of the internationalisation models and practices in different disciplines such as psychology, sociology and political science, which is followed by a discussion on the internationalisation of education organisations in different countries with some examples from Arab and non-Western countries. The final section presents a critical review of literature on internationalising the curriculum and how culture competency and knowledge acquisition are key factors in achieving effective internationalisation. The chapter concludes with an overview of the book collection and the main ideas and concepts discussed in each chapter.

1 – 10 of 74