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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Marta Mas-Machuca and Frederic Marimon

The purpose of this paper is to define a new and broader concept of spirituality called holistic spiritual capital (HSpC), which encompasses and identifies the dimensions proposed…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define a new and broader concept of spirituality called holistic spiritual capital (HSpC), which encompasses and identifies the dimensions proposed by various authors and to propose a metric scale for HSpC and its validation.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a survey of 201 residents of Spain administered in May, 2015. Exploratory factor analysis and a subsequent confirmatory analysis were conducted using structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques with EQS software.

Findings

Four dimensions reflect the latent construct of HSpC in different ways: health, creativity, morality and religiosity.

Practical implications

The measurement of HSpC should be considered relevant to organizations, but not merely because it may be a tool to increase productivity. Ethical climate influenced organizational commitment and hence it enhances performance indicators.

Originality/value

The proposed scale encompasses in a unique instrument some dimensions considered previously in the literature independently.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2019

Marta Mas-Machuca and Frederic Marimon

Mission statements (SMs) are a frequent strategic tool, yet little is known about their effects on economic performance. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to model and…

Abstract

Purpose

Mission statements (SMs) are a frequent strategic tool, yet little is known about their effects on economic performance. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to model and assess the relationships among the sense-making of the SM, employee mission engagement (EME), organizational mission fulfillment (OMF) and perceived organizational performance (PER) and, second, to determine the path that best explains these connections.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports the results of an empirical investigation drawn from a sample of 132 managers at different levels in two Spanish companies. The data analysis was performed in two steps: the first was to assess the reliability of the measurement scales and the second was to build a causal model using structural equation modeling analysis.

Findings

The findings suggest that the best path to explain the relationships between the SM and perceived organizational performance (PER) is SM, EME, OMF, PER, with a full mediation effect for EME and OMF. These findings are consistent with previous research.

Practical implications

The managerial implications of these results are that just having a good mission and effective communication of the mission is not enough. The mission has to be related to employee engagement and, at the same time, the organization needs to be mission driven.

Originality/value

This research provides a new paradigm for understanding the relationships between sense-making around the SM, EME, OMF and PER, and helps to adjudicate among possible outcome paths and better explain the inter-relationships among these constructs.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the effectiveness of active teaching methodologies, namely, problem-oriented learning and the case method, to develop sustainability competencies. It also analyses the advantages and challenges for teachers when implementing the sustainable development goals (SDGs) in eight undergraduate and postgraduate degrees within the framework of a cross-departmental collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed research methodology was used: a quantitative study to assess the levels of acquisition of sustainability and research competencies and the potential correlation between them, as well as a mixed study of the advantages and challenges for the teachers participating in the cross-departmental initiative. Curriculum content linked to the SDGs was worked on. Active teaching methodologies and a competency assessment rubric were used as curriculum implementation strategies in the eight courses involved.

Findings

Active teaching methodologies are suitable to implement the SDGs in university teaching and to develop both sustainability and research competencies. A synergic effect is observed between them. Coordinated work between teachers of different subjects in several degrees contributes to developing a culture of sustainability at the university.

Research limitations/implications

Although the collaboration between teachers from different disciplines was successful, this study did not promote interdisciplinary projects among students from different degrees. This promises to be highly valuable for future research.

Practical implications

Students can become present and future leaders in achieving the SDGs. This approach can be replicated in other educational institutions.

Social implications

This study bridges the gap between theoretical recommendations and the practical implementation of the SDGs in undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.

Originality/value

Coordinated work between teachers of different subjects in different degrees contributes to the development of a culture of sustainability at the university.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Ivan Malbašić, Frederic Marimon and Marta Mas-Machuca

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a specific category of organizational values on organizational effectiveness. Specifically, the aim of the paper is twofold…

1164

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a specific category of organizational values on organizational effectiveness. Specifically, the aim of the paper is twofold: to propose a metric scale for assessing the organizational values, and to find the impact that different categories of values have on the overall effectiveness of the organization, as an overall measure of organizational success. Moreover, this second objective is expanded with the moderation between values and effectiveness when different balanced scorecard (BSC) perspectives are attended in a balanced way.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach is empirical, based on surveying employees – in total 813 valid responses were obtained, alongside with other information sources within 24 companies in the Republic of Croatia. A set of analyses using structural equation modelling were conducted in order to: define a scale to assess organizational values, assess the impact of different categories of values on organizational effectiveness, and assess the moderator role of the balancing attention to stakeholders.

Findings

The findings show that construct of organizational values is multifactorial, composed by business, relational, development, and contribution values. These values categories (except relational values) are significant antecedents of effectiveness. Moreover, the balancing of the attention paid to different BSC perspectives moderates the impact of the contribution values on effectiveness.

Originality/value

The present study sought to expand the understanding of organizational values and their impact on performance and to ask if focussing on a specific category of values can increase the overall level of organizational effectiveness.

Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

Sharon Gotteiner, Marta Mas-Machuca and Frederic Marimon

Most mature organizations face a major decline in performance at some time during their existence. For more than three decades, it has been suggested that the management practices…

Abstract

Purpose

Most mature organizations face a major decline in performance at some time during their existence. For more than three decades, it has been suggested that the management practices that could cure a troubled company could have also kept it well. Inspired by this concept, this paper is proposing a preventive approach to early implementation of turnaround strategies as an alternative for otherwise traumatic rescue efforts, further along the downward spiral.

Design/methodology/approach

Corporate turnaround strategies and associated risks are integrated with a risk-based approach, along with a proactive decision-making process. The link between turnaround research, resource-based view, the sources of organizational decline, and the governance of organizational-decline-related risks – is explained.

Findings

The integrated model streamlines a preventive organizational process for considering the suitability of commonly used turnaround practices – for the non-crisis business routine of a mature company. By considering and adjusting the risks associated with such practices, it addresses risk aversion at the early stages of decline and determines the optimal sequence and timing of retrenchment and recovery activities. As such, it encourages mature companies to take actions for reducing their exposure to organizational decline. Accordingly, the model is named the “Anti-Aging” framework.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical testing of the suitability of turnaround strategies for non-crisis situations is proposed as a direction for future research.

Practical implications

The Anti-Aging framework opens an opportunity for the senior management of a mature organization to respond earlier to organizational decline and avoid the trauma associated with otherwise more challenging conditions, for the benefit of all stakeholders.

Originality/value

The Anti-Aging framework proposes an innovative way of bridging the gap between the benefits of early implementation of turnaround strategies, and major obstacles faced by willing, traditional management teams of mature organizations.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 42 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to define a dashboard of indicators to assess the quality performance of higher education institutions (HEI). The instrument is termed SMART-QUAL.

Design/methodology/approach

Two sources were used in order to explore potential indicators. In the first step, information disclosed in official websites or institutional documentation of 36 selected HEIs was analyzed. This first step also included in depth structured high managers’ interviews. A total of 223 indicators emerged. In a second step, recent specialized literature was revised searching for indicators, capturing additional 302 indicators.

Findings

Each one of the 525 total indicators was classified according to some attributes and distributed into 94 intermediate groups. These groups feed a debugging, prioritization and selection process, which ended up in the SMART-QUAL instrument: a set of 56 key performance indicators, which are grouped in 15 standards, and, in turn, classified into the 3 HEI missions. A basic model and an extended model are also proposed.

Originality/value

The paper provides a useful measure of quality performance of HEIs, showing a holistic view to monitor HEI quality from three fundamental missions. This instrument might assist HEI managers for both assessing and benchmarking purposes. The paper ends with recommendations for university managers and public administration authorities.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Anna Akhmedova, Neus Vila-Brunet and Marta Mas-Machuca

The sharing economy is the internet-enabled business model that has changed the way people travel, work and interact. Similar to other internet-enabled settings, trust is of…

2421

Abstract

Purpose

The sharing economy is the internet-enabled business model that has changed the way people travel, work and interact. Similar to other internet-enabled settings, trust is of paramount importance for the sharing economy as it leads to continued use and positive word-of-mouth. The main objectives of this research are twofold: (1) to identify the most relevant antecedents of trust in the sharing economy; and (2) to identify which combination of these antecedents allows repurchase intention and positive word-of-mouth to be achieved.

Design/methodology/approach

Through revision of trust theories and complementary frameworks, and an analysis of the sharing economy, the authors develop a model of trust for the sharing economy. The authors propose a model assuming that different types of trust will form a limited number of pathways valid for the creation of positive behavioural intentions. The authors use qualitative comparative analysis to empirically assess the proposed model on a sample of 235 sharing economy users.

Findings

The authors find two configurations that jointly suggest the key role of website quality and usability in generating consumer trust. The authors propose that, on the one hand, platforms might focus on creating value-added services and increasing the reliability of the platform brand. On the other hand, platforms can focus on creating good signalling mechanisms and educate their service providers towards reliable behaviour.

Originality/value

The authors build a conceptual model of trust in the sharing economy setting, that considers the feedback loops among the combination of several dimensions. The authors define specific strategies for platforms in the sharing economy that lead to repurchase intention and positive word-of-mouth.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Marta Mas Machuca and Carme Martínez Costa

The purpose of this paper is to identify the values that make up a knowledge‐friendly culture in the consulting industry, in which the implementation of in‐house knowledge…

3117

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the values that make up a knowledge‐friendly culture in the consulting industry, in which the implementation of in‐house knowledge management (KM) projects has positive performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory analysis and a structural equation model were used on a sample of 100 knowledge workers (managers and internal KM project managers) in the consulting sector.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that the values identified (trust, transparency, flexibility, collaboration, commitment, honesty and professionalism) bear a close positive relation to the success of the KM project implementation (innovation, employee satisfaction, capabilities, quality and productivity). These values are divided into three groups.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses on the consulting industry in Catalonia, Spain; further research will be required in order to apply the findings to other countries in the world.

Practical implications

The study provides a better understanding of the cultural success factor in knowledge management initiatives. It offers a significant and practical advance in terms of systematizing KM in organizations.

Originality/value

Knowledge management plays a crucial role in consulting companies, so it is necessary to determine the factors that contribute to its success, and particularly the factor of knowledge culture. However, few empirical studies have analyzed these values. The paper's main contribution is therefore identification of the core values of a knowledge‐friendly culture and their impact on performance.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 112 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Frederic Marimon, Marta Mas-Machuca and Carlos Rey

Many companies have a mission statement that they disseminate through corporate communication to stakeholders and particularly to employees. However, the communication action…

1499

Abstract

Purpose

Many companies have a mission statement that they disseminate through corporate communication to stakeholders and particularly to employees. However, the communication action alone does not ensure that employees take true “ownership” of the mission. Having a mission and internalizing that mission are quite different. The purpose of this paper is to provide a scale to assess the internalization of the mission (IM). Additionally, the authors explore the relationship between IM and organizational alignment.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous research on mission internalization, the authors test the conditions necessary for reaching true mission internalization. A first sample of 132 managers from two companies was used for an exploratory analysis: thereafter, a second universal sample of 400 people was used to confirm the scale. Structural Equation Modeling was used to analyze the dimensions deployed in the latent IM construct. This construct has been examined as a second-order factor. A multi-group analysis across these two companies provides nomological validation of the IM scale.

Findings

A scale of 18 items gathered under five dimensions is proposed. Accordingly, the findings are that IM comprises five dimensions: leadership, importance, knowledge, co-workers’ engagement and implication. The five dimensions count equally for the IM.

Practical implications

This study provides a useful measure to assess the IM. To achieve a good degree of internalization across employees, the employees must feel that the mission is worthy of engagement and that it is aligned with their personal values.

Originality/value

The paper addresses gaps in the current literature on mission statements regarding the effective implementation of the corporate mission. The results can serve as criteria for managers to obtain better IM for all employees.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Marta Mas‐Machuca

471

Abstract

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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