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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2014

Sulev Nurme, Zenia Kotval, Nele Nutt, Mart Hiob and Sirle Salmistu

The concepts of “historically valuable landscape,” “historical landscape space,” “landscape space attached to an object of cultural importance,” etc. seem to be understood…

Abstract

Purpose

The concepts of “historically valuable landscape,” “historical landscape space,” “landscape space attached to an object of cultural importance,” etc. seem to be understood by most landscape professionals, yet these terms are highly abstract with many possible interpretations. The protected zone of cultural monuments prescribed by law helps to ensure the preservation of these historic artifacts and signifiers of local heritage. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper seeks to provide guidelines that can be articulated to protect cultural landscapes. These guidelines are based on a manorial core study was carried out in 2010 to analyze the changes in road networks and spatial systems of manors over the past 150 years. This study is part of a larger research effort on different aspects of Estonian baroque manor gardens.

Findings

Many landscapes may contain historically relevant objects and phenomena not protected by law, which, nevertheless form the basis of a unique local landscape. The altering of such a landscape not only changes its natural form, but may directly impact the cultural identity and milieu of the area, thereby affecting how its inhabitants relate to their environment.

Originality/value

Preservation of historic buildings and landscapes plays an important role particularly in relation to manor landscapes. This network has remained well preserved, and the rural landscape based on this Baltic-German manor culture is still strongly reflected in the current landscape through the existing historic landscape elements like housing, viewsheds, roads, etc. Without landscape analysis, it can be challenging for an outsider to understand the spatial context, especially when it has changed and evolved through the years.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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