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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Erika Harden, Lucy R. Ford, Marshall Pattie and Patricia Lanier

In response to external conditions, organizations yearn to gain a competitive edge during unremitting change. Recognizing the importance of managing change, researchers…

Abstract

Purpose

In response to external conditions, organizations yearn to gain a competitive edge during unremitting change. Recognizing the importance of managing change, researchers have aggressively investigated organizational change at the macro level. This research, however, argues that an employee's ability to cope with change is a function of both micro (individual) and macro (contextual) factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected at an organization that was undergoing a significant internal change. Correlational and structural equation modeling techniques were used for data analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that individual differences (intolerance for ambiguity) and contextual factors (LMX, TMX receipts and TMX contributions) are important factors for understanding the ability to manage organizational change effectively. Additionally, it is argued that contextual factors not only have direct effects on coping with change but indirect effects through perceptions of work group effectiveness. Our results indicate that both micro and macro factors are important for understanding the ability to cope with and manage change.

Research limitations/implications

The research leaves open some interesting questions around the role of contextual factors in coping with change, in addition to the interaction with individual differences.

Practical implications

Most sources discuss change as focused at the organizational level. Managers will be well served to understand that the degree to which employees cope effectively with change will be partly determined by the interaction of individual differences and the organizational and team level context.

Originality/value

This research extends our understanding of the relationship between social exchange relationships and how individuals cope with change in organizations and the mechanism by which that occurs.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Marshall Pattie, Marion M. White and Judy Tansky

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of repatriate support practices in organizations within the context of the current literature in this field of study.

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3099

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of repatriate support practices in organizations within the context of the current literature in this field of study.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 42 firms employing 3,234 expatriates were surveyed regarding human resource practices that support repatriation. Analysis focused on support practices as predictors of voluntary and involuntary turnover.

Findings

Results indicate that the majority of firms surveyed used two or fewer repatriate support practices. While 60 percent of firms offered logistical assistance, such as relocation services, less than 70 percent offered career and training support for repatriates. The most common cause of involuntary turnover is the lack of job openings in the home organization upon reentry, while the most common cause of voluntary turnover is the organization's poor utilization of the expatriate's skills acquired on the overseas assignment. Organizations with more support practices reported a lower average repatriate turnover compared to organizations with fewer support practices.

Practical implications

While previous literature suggests that repatriate support practices are critical, this research finds that few organizations are providing sufficient support to mitigate turnover.

Originality/value

In contrast to much of the research on repatriation that relies on individual perceptions, this paper utilizes organization level survey data provided by 42 firms that document their repatriate support practices.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Marshall Pattie

The purpose of this paper is to report on the sixth international conference on occupational stress and health.

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3147

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the sixth international conference on occupational stress and health.

Design/methodology/approach

In March 2006, the sixth international conference on occupational stress and health was held jointly by the American Psychological Association (APA) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in Miami. The conference title was “Work, Stress, and Health 2006: Making a Difference in the Workplace” . Papers presented at the conference provided important insight on the growing body of diversity literature.

Findings

Specifically, researchers found that diversity plays a significant role in understanding the effects of occupational stress. Stress may be preceived differently, dealth with differently and may have different outcomes for minorities than with male Caucasians.

Practical Implications

The session on Interpersonal violence suggested that researchers should consider the employment status and occupational level of victims. Furthermore, new research is trying to estimate the actual financial cost to organizations.

Originality/value

Overall, the conference was successful and provided future directions for research on diversity and occupational stress.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

John S. Marsh, William J. Wales, Rachel Graefe-Anderson and Marshall W. Pattie

The purpose of this study is to explore post-acquisition compensation management and examine how the two most commonly used theories to explain CEO stock option exercise…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore post-acquisition compensation management and examine how the two most commonly used theories to explain CEO stock option exercise, agency theory and CEO overconfidence, expect CEOs to manage their stock options following an acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach

Using logistic regression analysis, the authors investigate whether CEOs are more or less likely to exercise options following an acquisition, and the effect which CEO tenure and acquisition history may have on option exercise.

Findings

The results suggest that CEOs are more likely to exercise options following an acquisition. The authors also find that CEO tenure and acquisition experience are both linked to an increase in option exercise.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that future research should expect agency effects to outweigh overconfidence effects when considering CEO stock option exercise behavior within the post-acquisition firm context.

Practical implications

This paper advises directors and shareholders about whether agency concerns or overconfidence are of greater concern and how CEO tenure and past acquisition history may influence post-acquisition CEO stock option exercise behavior, offering information valuable in designing effective corporate governance.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first to explore how CEOs manage their options following an acquisition and finds that CEOs are more likely to exercise stock options following an acquisition. Post-acquisition compensation management is an important, though overlooked, consideration in improving acquisition performance.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Myrtle P. Bell

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41

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1986

Library of Congress update The Urgent Supplemental Appropriations Bill for FY 1986 signed into law in July by Ronald Reagan contained an appropriation of $867 000 for the…

Abstract

Library of Congress update The Urgent Supplemental Appropriations Bill for FY 1986 signed into law in July by Ronald Reagan contained an appropriation of $867 000 for the Library of Congress. This means that the general reading room is able to restore evening and weekend hours. The ten “Books Not Bombs” people who first protested the closure spent several weeks in July in a courtroom trial, where testimony was given by the Librarian of Congress and other officials. Since the “freedom readers”; as they are called in a newspaper article, face jail and/or a fine, perhaps appreciative scholars and researchers should start a fund to help defray the costs of their protest.

Details

New Library World, vol. 87 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Max Chipulu, Udechukwu Ojiako and Alasdair Marshall

The purpose of this study is to examine whether individual demographic and socio-cultural factors affect actions taken by consumers in relation to ethical violations and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine whether individual demographic and socio-cultural factors affect actions taken by consumers in relation to ethical violations and failure (or perceived ethical violations and failure) by service operations firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was undertaken over a two-year period, from 2011 to 2013, and involved sampling 3,155 respondents from 19 countries. Data analysis was undertaken utilizing hierarchical linear modelling (HLM).

Findings

Findings suggest that although both individual demographic factors (age and gender) and societal differences do affect ethical actions taken by service consumers, inter-societal cluster variations have a more significant effect on the ethical action than individual demographic differences do.

Originality/value

For service operations firms, the study findings offer evidence on the need for constant readjustment of service attributes in line with the ethical dispositions of the different demographic and socio-cultural clusters within the consumer base.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

William H. Dutton

This paper aims to provide a critical assessment of the Internet of things (IoT) and the social and policy issues raised by its development. While the Internet will…

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5190

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a critical assessment of the Internet of things (IoT) and the social and policy issues raised by its development. While the Internet will continue to become ever more central to everyday life and work, there is a new but complementary vision for an IoT, which will connect billions of objects – “things” like sensors, monitors, and radio-frequency identification devices – to the Internet at a scale that far outstrips use of the Internet as we know it, and will have enormous social and economic implications.

Design/methodology/approach

It is based on a review of literature and emerging developments, including synthesis of a workshop and discussions within a special interest group on the IoT.

Findings

Nations can harvest the potential of this wave of innovation not only for manufacturing but also for everyday life and work and the development of new information and services that will change the way we do things in many walks of life. However, its success is not inevitable. Technical visions will not lead inexorably to successful public and private infrastructures that support the vitality of an IoT and the quality of everyday life and work. In fact, the IoT could undermine such core values as privacy, equality, trust and individual choice if not designed, implemented and governed in appropriate ways.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for more multi-disciplinary research on the IoT.

Practical implications

Policymakers and opinion formers need to understand the IoT and its implications.

Social implications

If the right policies and business models are developed, the IoT will stimulate major social, economic and service innovations in the next years and decades.

Originality/value

This paper pulls together discussions and literature from a social science perspective, as one means to enable more multidisciplinary studies of emerging developments.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1964

MR. ALBERT HILL has been fitter, shop steward, foreman and works manager. He is now managing director of the Yorkshire engineering group which proposes to negotiate a ‘job…

Abstract

MR. ALBERT HILL has been fitter, shop steward, foreman and works manager. He is now managing director of the Yorkshire engineering group which proposes to negotiate a ‘job for life’ agreement with its workers. In a recent address to the Institution of Works Managers he commented on the views of an American consultant which we quoted on this page last month.

Details

Work Study, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Olivia Sagan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experience of loneliness amongst people who have been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experience of loneliness amongst people who have been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a narrative phenomenological approach.

Findings

The study found that the loneliness experienced amongst this group of participants was perceived to have taken root in childhood and was not a transient state. Its endurance, however, had led participants to develop a number of strategies as means by which to manage what was felt to be a deep seated painful sense of emptiness; some of these strategies were, however, risky or harmful.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include the absence of longitudinal data which would have offered the opportunity for the close study of how people manage the experience over time.

Practical implications

The study has practical implications for mental health professionals wishing to better understand the difficulties faced by individuals with the characteristics described, but it also highlights the resilience of sufferers who, while living with acute loneliness continue to explore ways of managing it.

Social implications

The study brings to the attention that the connectivity and sociability required and expected in today’s society emphasise the lack of lonely individuals, further stigmatising loneliness as deficit and taboo.

Originality/value

The paper offers a welcome addition to loneliness studies in its adherence to the phenomenological experience and offers a small corrective to the bulk of existing loneliness studies which, while valuable have been more attentive to exploring the constituent elements of loneliness than the lived experience of it.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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