Search results

1 – 10 of 414
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Interview by Juliet Harrison

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with the million‐selling author, Marshall Goldsmith.

Downloads
1083

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an interview with the million‐selling author, Marshall Goldsmith.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an interview with Marshall Goldsmith, who is author and editor of 31 books, including the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller, MOJO, and the WSJ number one business book and winner of the Harold Longman Award for Business Book of the Year, What Got You Here Won't Get You There. His books have been translated into 28 languages, and have become bestsellers in eight countries.

Findings

In the interview, Marshall discusses his innovative approach to executive coaching; the impact of social media for leaders and chief executive officers; and his current research on employee engagement.

Originality/value

The paper highlights that the key figure in executive coaching, upon whom the success of the coaching hinges, is the client themselves.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Marshall Goldsmith

“The value of leadership training needs to be measured more effectively”, says executive coach Marshall Goldsmith. Here, he explains how.

Abstract

“The value of leadership training needs to be measured more effectively”, says executive coach Marshall Goldsmith. Here, he explains how.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Robert M. Fulmer, Philip A. Gibbs and Marshall Goldsmith

The authors present a case study of how Hewlett‐Packard is changing its culture under the direction of its new chief executive Carly Fiorina. Fiorina says her challenge is…

Downloads
1187

Abstract

The authors present a case study of how Hewlett‐Packard is changing its culture under the direction of its new chief executive Carly Fiorina. Fiorina says her challenge is “to make sure HP represents the next century rather than the last one.” To prepare for the future, company leaders saw the need to create a “New HP Way.” Under the new way, all HP employees — but especially managers — must be leaders who generate enthusiasm and respond with extra effort to meet customer needs. They must personally accept responsibility and are encouraged to upgrade their skills and capabilities through ongoing training and development.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2015

Denise Kwan and Libi Shen

The purpose of this case study was to explore senior librarians’ perceptions of successful leadership skills in the 21st century. The data gathered from 10 senior library…

Abstract

The purpose of this case study was to explore senior librarians’ perceptions of successful leadership skills in the 21st century. The data gathered from 10 senior library leaders consisted of demographic information and responses to six open-ended interview questions. From the NVivo 10 analysis, several significant themes emerged regarding successful library leadership skills in the 21st century at two levels: foundational and interpersonal. At the foundational level, technical and knowledge skills form the building blocks for the next level of interpersonal skills. Persuasion and collaborative skills are interwoven with these interpersonal skills, both of which are at the core of the postindustrial paradigm of leadership. These two levels of skills, with an emphasis on persuasion skills, should form the basis of succession planning programs for next generation librarians. Implementing such programs could lead to increased leadership diversity, greater job satisfaction, improved job performance and effectiveness, all of which help retain librarians and ease staff shortages. Further studies are recommended.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-910-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Maria Bernabo, Ivan Garcia‐Bassets, Laura Gaines, Christian Knauer, Alfred Lewis, Liem Nguyen and Leila Zolfaghari

The development and proliferation of cellular/wireless technology has changed the competitive environment of traditional cooper based telephony. The complexity in the…

Downloads
2375

Abstract

Purpose

The development and proliferation of cellular/wireless technology has changed the competitive environment of traditional cooper based telephony. The complexity in the competitive environment coupled with advances in technology and innovation is requiring management to rethink strategy formulation and implementation. Convergence is discussed in the context of discontinuous competitive environment and possible management responses to changes.

Design/methodology/approach

The findings of this paper are based on the analysis of the communications industry, a comprehensive review of trends in innovation and technology, strategic diagnosis and implication for management.

Findings

The rate of change in innovation is leading to the creation of new industries and the disintegration of the industry classifications due to convergence of multiple needs previously served by different industry groupings. As such, firms have to upgrade their environmental scanning systems to detect competitive forces beyond the industrial competitive boundaries.

Practical implications

The paper provides a comprehensive review of convergence and disruptive technologies

Originality/value

The paper highlights the breakdown of barriers in terms of industry classification. Customer's needs could be served by firms in hitherto distinct industry groupings.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Jon Kevin Loebbaka and Alfred Lewis

Safety management systems are created by firms to insure workplace safety while managing acceptable levels of risk. Global competition and the need to assimilate new…

Downloads
3352

Abstract

Purpose

Safety management systems are created by firms to insure workplace safety while managing acceptable levels of risk. Global competition and the need to assimilate new processes, materials, and technologies, have imparted a more immediate financial and societal imperative in identifying the firm's safety stakeholders. This research identifies a strategic framework to be used by organizations in managing their safety management systems and stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

Management's ability to organize stakeholders' demands is central to prioritizing safety knowledge and channeling that knowledge effectively through the organization. Management's safety strategy dilemma can be condensed through the optic of a knowledge‐based decision cycle. The three‐stage decision cycle developed in this research asserts that setting safety strategy is simultaneously a knowledge management challenge for the firm and a process of identifying stakeholder salience.

Findings

The safety management system model presented classifies the organization's stakeholders critical to each stage of the strategy setting process. Clarifying stakeholders' power, legitimacy, and urgency is essential in prioritizing and developing those stakeholders' safety knowledge. This decision model should improve the prospect of managers implementing successful safety management system strategies.

Originality/value

The societal and financial costs of workplace safety management system failures diminish organization's effectiveness. This model provides a new approach to implementing knowledge based safety strategies from the organization's stakeholders.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Alfred Lewis and Jon Loebbaka

The purpose of this paper is to depict the increasing level of environmental turbulence in the aerospace aluminium industry utilizing a case study to highlight success…

Downloads
4439

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to depict the increasing level of environmental turbulence in the aerospace aluminium industry utilizing a case study to highlight success strategies. The paper examines the impact of the environmental turbulence of September 11, 2001 on the commercial aerospace industry and how a firm successfully re‐adapted its corporate strategies in response to the discontinuity.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives of this paper were addressed through an examination of firms' strategy formulation and deployment methods. Furthermore, the incidence of strategic decay coupled with resilience of firms in the aerospace industry is discussed with reference to the September 11, 2001 event in the United States.

Findings

Aerospace aluminium suppliers have mainly concentrated their efforts in the development of high strength patented alloys in order to defend market share. The aircraft manufactures namely Airbus and Boeing are in the process of shifting to composite materials in order to achieve significant weight reductions coupled with greater fuel efficiency.

Originality/value

The work highlights how a company can use strategic resilience to adapt to the dynamic environment of an oligopic market dominated by Airbus and Boeing.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Marshall Goldsmith

This paper aims to describe the steps used to help any successful person change their interpersonal behavior at work and at home.

Downloads
2222

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the steps used to help any successful person change their interpersonal behavior at work and at home.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a review of “before‐and‐after” studies with tens of thousands of coaching participants from large corporations, each in a different sector with very different competitive pressures.

Findings

There are four key beliefs that tend to differentiate more successful people from their peers, and some specific coaching approaches that are more effective in working with this population.

Research limitations/implications

While much more research needs to be done on this topic, there is a clear body of knowledge that can help make the best performers even better.

Practical implications

If successful people see the connection between their behavior change goals and their personal goals, they will be much more likely to change. Have the successful person receive input on one to two important, self‐selected behaviors as perceived by important, self‐selected raters. Then have the person involve these respected colleagues in the behavior change process. Finally, teach the successful person's colleagues to be helpful coaches, not cynics, critics or judges.

Originality/value

Most research on behavioral change has focused on dysfunctional behavior. In this paper, the author presents knowledge on the unique challenges involved in helping successful people, rather than focusing on dysfunctional people.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Henry Petersen and Harrie Vredenburg

The purpose of this paper is to extend our understanding of corporate governance, social issues and capital markets by distinguishing between the socially responsible

Downloads
5484

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend our understanding of corporate governance, social issues and capital markets by distinguishing between the socially responsible investing phenomenon and mainstream investing with respect to social issues. It attempts to clarify the domain by casting it in the theoretical frame of prospect theory and mental modeling. With a qualitative study done among large institutional investors in the Canadian securities industry, the article derives a proposed mental model of these institutional investors' cognitive model of social issues as they impact investments.

Findings

The institutional investors in this study know exactly where value is derived from social investments suggesting that there may be more alignment between directors, investors and societal expectations than has been previously suggested.

Research limitations/implications

The limited number of organizations in the study reduces the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

Managers and directors must have an understanding of how shareholder value and responsibilities intersect. In our research, we have found that these executives positioned their firms as leaders on the social responsibility front. Interestingly, their major shareholders also understood how responsibility and shareholder value intersected and as a result, financial performance was not sacrificed.

Originality/value

The findings from this research shed light on previous scholars' questions regarding the alignment of interests between managers, directors and social expectations. The firms analyzed make strategic investments that are considered to meet social expectations but that are also perceived to add value to the organization making the firm more attractive to institutional investors.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

1 – 10 of 414