Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 December 2020

Florian Hüter and Frank Rieg

A general first-invariant constitutive model has been derived in literature for incompressible, isotropic hyperelastic materials, known as Marlow model, which reproduces…

Abstract

Purpose

A general first-invariant constitutive model has been derived in literature for incompressible, isotropic hyperelastic materials, known as Marlow model, which reproduces test data exactly without the need of curve-fitting procedures. This paper aims to describe how to extend Marlow’s constitutive model to the more general case of compressible hyperelastic materials.

Design/methodology/approach

The isotropic constitutive model is based on a strain energy function, whose isochoric part is solely dependent on the first modified strain invariant. Based on Marlow’s idea, a principle of energetically equivalent deformation states is derived for the compressible case, which is used to determine the underlying strain energy function directly from measured test data. No particular functional of the strain energy function is assumed. It is shown how to calibrate the volumetric and isochoric strain energy functions uniquely with uniaxial or biaxial test data only. The constitutive model is implemented into a finite element program to demonstrate its applicability.

Findings

The model is well suited for use in finite element analysis. Only one set of test data is required for calibration without any need for curve-fitting procedures. These test data are reproduced exactly, and the model prediction is reasonable for other deformation modes.

Originality/value

Marlow’s basic concept is extended to the compressible case and applied to both the volumetric and isochoric part of the compressible strain energy function. Moreover, a novel approach is described on how both compressive and tensile test data can be used simultaneously to calibrate the model.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

William D. Giles and Rob Lewis

How can managers start to change the beliefs and direction of alarge organization? What is the role which team learning tools can playin making such changes possible…

Abstract

How can managers start to change the beliefs and direction of a large organization? What is the role which team learning tools can play in making such changes possible? Illustrates the difficulties in implementing a market strategy for the introduction of ISDN‐Integrated Services Digital Networks. BT′s opportunity cut across the conventional organization boundaries and challenged many of the mental models which typified current thinking. Demonstrates how a system of team learning based on the “Marlow Model” can build new, more holistic models of the marketplace. From this kernel of understanding, the challenge of influencing the direction of the organization at large began to emerge. Shares both the pitfalls and the successes to help others who may be considering setting out on similar programmes.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Cindy Claycomb and Dean Headley

Public smoking bans are becoming more prevalent, but not without controversy. Consumer attitudes about the effectiveness of service provider imposed smoking/nonsmoking…

Abstract

Purpose

Public smoking bans are becoming more prevalent, but not without controversy. Consumer attitudes about the effectiveness of service provider imposed smoking/nonsmoking separation have changed. Arguments against bans often center on the belief that patronage at restaurants and bars will decline, leading to declining entertainment sector revenue and the elimination of privately owned establishments by public policy. This paper aims to investigate consumers ' beliefs and behavioral intentions concerning a proposed smoking ban.

Design/methodology/approach

The study presented involves a typical US city facing a vote by their city council for a public smoking ban (including restaurants and bars). In 2007 consumers ' beliefs and behavioral intentions concerning a proposed smoking ban were investigated. Current study findings were compared to a prior study about consumers ' beliefs that smoking/nonsmoking sections were effective at separation, and hence did not support public smoking bans. The authors applied logistic regression to determine if consumers ' beliefs about the effectiveness of smoking/nonsmoking sections influenced their support for public smoking bans.

Findings

The comparison clearly suggests that beliefs have changed. The majority of consumers in this most recent study do not believe in the effectiveness of separate smoking/nonsmoking sections. Consequently, this majority of newly enlightened consumers is in favor of public smoking bans in restaurants and bars. To further address the economic impact argument, the authors offer a conservatively based argument that restaurants and bars could expect economic gains.

Originality/value

There will always be some winners and losers with new policy, but it is found that the overall restaurant and bar sector can expect increased patronage and economic gains from a smoking ban.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Georgios Outsios and Seemab Ara Farooqi

Existing research highlights gender as an important dimension for entrepreneurship theory and practice. This study aims to explore the differences between female and male…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing research highlights gender as an important dimension for entrepreneurship theory and practice. This study aims to explore the differences between female and male sustainable entrepreneurs in the areas of previous professional experiences, their performance and growth, their use of financial resources and their overall attitude to risk.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a feminist perspective and on the basis of empirical evidence gathered through a series of 20 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with male and female sustainable entrepreneurs in the UK, thr authors analyse differences between male and female sustainable entrepreneurs.

Findings

The findings suggest that female role models play a significant role in the emergence of women sustainable entrepreneurs who start from the same experience levels as men, show strong feminist attitudes and are conscious of their contribution to global sustainability. Sustainable entrepreneurship offers women professional development and a limited flexibility to balance work and family commitments. Lack of funding appears to be a major constraint applying to both female and male participants, while the authors argue that business pragmatism in a difficult investment environment triggered women’s reluctance to take on debt. Nonetheless, female sustainable entrepreneurs were found to have developed and used their professional and social networks to a greater extent than their male counterparts.

Originality/value

This study offers a new gender perspective to the research of sustainable entrepreneurship and, at the same time, contributes with findings from research on sustainable entrepreneurs to the study of gender in management.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Robert Smith, Sara Nadin and Sally Jones

This paper aims to examine the concepts of gendered, entrepreneurial identity and fetishism through an analysis of images of Barbie entrepreneur. It draws on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the concepts of gendered, entrepreneurial identity and fetishism through an analysis of images of Barbie entrepreneur. It draws on the literature of entrepreneurial identity and fetishism to examine how such identity is socially constructed from childhood and how exposure to such dolls can shape and influence perceptions of entrepreneurial identity.

Design/methodology/approach

Using semiotic analysis the authors conduct a visual analysis of the Barbie to make observations and inferences on gendered entrepreneurial identity and fetishism from the dolls and artifacts.

Findings

The gendered images of Barbie dolls were influenced by societal perceptions of what an entrepreneur should look like, reflecting the fetishisation of entrepreneurship, especially for women. Mirroring and exaggerating gendered perceptions, the dolls express hyper-femininity reflected in both the physical embodiment of the doll and their adornments/accessories. This includes handbags, high-heeled shoes, short skirts, haute-couture and designer clothes. Such items and the dolls themselves become fetishised objects, making context and culture of vital importance.

Research limitations/implications

There are positive and negative implications in relation to how the authors might, as a society, present unrealistic gendered images and role models of entrepreneurship to children. The obvious limitation is that the methodology limits what can be said or understood, albeit the imagery mirrors socially constructed reality for the context examined.

Originality/value

This is original research in that no previous published studies have tackled gendered entrepreneurial identity in relation to fetishism. The value of the work lies in discussing the concepts and embeds them in the expanding conversation surrounding gendered entrepreneurial identities.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

This section contains a range of topics from diverse, international, primary journals, including: an evaluation of PR effectiveness; a look at total quality management at…

Abstract

This section contains a range of topics from diverse, international, primary journals, including: an evaluation of PR effectiveness; a look at total quality management at Girobank, which was the first bank to win a British Quality Award; an examination of the principles of competitive marketing based on a case study; a discussion of how companies can sustain competitive advantage; and a report on retail‐oriented risk for bank branch operations.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Mandy Wheadon and Nathalie Duval-Couetil

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of conflicts between the innovation ideologies fundamental to entrepreneurial theory and the exclusivity embedded in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of conflicts between the innovation ideologies fundamental to entrepreneurial theory and the exclusivity embedded in the discipline’s research and discursive practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon entrepreneurship and critical theory literature to deconstruct some embedded assumptions inhibiting the participation of women as entrepreneurs.

Findings

The underrepresentation of female and minority entrepreneurs has been examined most often by researchers from the perspective of trying to discover and overcome barriers to participation, rather than seeking to understand why and how these barriers are created and sustained. The paper identifies processes contributing to the construction of obstacles inhibiting inclusivity and proposes that conscientious implementation of practices such as critical reflexivity can limit their reproduction.

Research limitations/implications

By situating critical theory and reflexivity as key practices for cultivating diversity and innovation in entrepreneurship, this paper offers a useful basis for expanding subsequent research and pedagogical practices representative of a wider variety of populations and activities.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship is key to job creation and economic growth. Rigid conceptualizations of entrepreneurship and unexamined biases of scholars and educators limit the accessibility of research and constrain students’ entrepreneurial intentions and behaviors.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in the literature by exploring disciplinary practices that cultivate and sustain gender exclusivity. It provides a structured approach to understanding discrepancies between the innovation entrepreneurship idealizes and the practices that confine participation to specific populations and economic practices.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Daniel Bishop

The purpose of this paper asks how workplace learning environments change as firm size increases, and how employees respond to this. In doing so, it looks beyond an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper asks how workplace learning environments change as firm size increases, and how employees respond to this. In doing so, it looks beyond an exclusive focus on formal training and incorporates more informal, work-based learning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a comparative, qualitative research design, using semi-structured interviews with an under-researched group of workers – waiting for staff in restaurants. The data were collected from six restaurants of different sizes.

Findings

As formally instituted human resource development (HRD) structures expand as firm size increases are more extensive in larger firms, this leaves less room for individual choice and agency in shaping the learning process. This does not inevitably constrain or enhance workplace learning, and can be experienced either negatively or positively by employees, depending on their previous working and learning experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Future research on HRD and workplace learning should acknowledge both formal and informal learning processes and the interaction between them – particularly in small and growing firms. Insights are drawn from the sociomaterial perspective help the authors to conceptualise this formality and informality. Research is needed in a wider range of sectors.

Practical implications

There are implications for managers in small, growing firms, in terms of how they maintain space for informal learning as formal HRD structures expand, and how they support learners who may struggle in less structured learning environments.

Originality/value

The paper extends current understanding of how the workplace learning environment – beyond a narrow focus on “training” – changes as firm size increases.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Niraj Kumar Jha and Udo Nackenhorst

The purpose of this paper is to develop a progressive damage framework to predict the fatigue life of cord-reinforced rubber composite under cyclic loadings. Special…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a progressive damage framework to predict the fatigue life of cord-reinforced rubber composite under cyclic loadings. Special attention has been paid to failure mechanisms, like cord–rubber interfacial debonding, and rubber matrix damage.

Design/methodology/approach

The constitutive modeling is based on the continuum damage mechanics (CDMs) and the thermodynamics of irreversible process. The damage in rubber is described by an istropic law, whereas elasto-plastic continuum model has been proposed for cord–rubber interphase layer. The numerical framework is implemented into commercial finite element code Abaqus/Standard via user subroutine (UMAT).

Findings

One of the most important findings obtained from reviewing various techniques is that meso-level fatigue damage modeling based on developed framework can simulate competitive damage scenarios, e.g. debonding, delamination or matrix failure.

Originality/value

A systematic framework for predicting failure in cord-reinforced rubber composite is formulated within the context of CDMs that can also be applied for industrial components, such as tires and airsprings.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

M. Emilia Bianco, Margaret Lombe and Mara Bolis

The purpose of this study is to explore the potential of women’s entrepreneurship to bring about greater gender equality. Understanding women’s entrepreneurship as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the potential of women’s entrepreneurship to bring about greater gender equality. Understanding women’s entrepreneurship as a gendered process (Bird and Brush, 2002), the study presents the challenges encountered by women entrepreneurs as a result of gender ideologies. It documents structural barriers, discriminatory interactions and oppressive gender scripts and their effects on the women and their businesses. Acknowledging women’s possibilities for agency and resistance, the study analyzes how women entrepreneurs conform, contest or negotiate gender scripts and constraints, and looks at the consequences of these actions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from elements of social interactionism and the doing and undoing gender theories, the authors use a feminist theoretic framework to guide analysis of qualitative data from two focus groups conducted with 19 women entrepreneurs in Colombia.

Findings

Gender ideologies were manifested in the forms of interrelated structural barriers that restricted women entrepreneurs’ access to resources. Social interactions represented spaces in which gender ideologies were reinforced, but also spaces women used to produce changes through resistance and accommodation strategies. Entrepreneurship was associated with positive changes toward greater gender equality, although negative consequences were reported.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the limited sample, more studies across countries may be needed for the consolidation of a generalizable theoretical framework.

Originality/value

This study presents a feminist theoretic framework in dialogue with the lived experiences of women entrepreneurs. It observes the processes of change toward gender equality embedded in business development.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000