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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Marlene Davies and Bernadette Schlitzer

The purpose of this paper is to review corporate governance literature from an international perspective in terms of having a global code of corporate governance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review corporate governance literature from an international perspective in terms of having a global code of corporate governance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a wide ranging literature review, the paper looks at the issue of a global corporate governance code of best practice from legal, corporate ownership structure and financial systems perspectives and the consequent/divergence issues that arise.

Findings

The paper supports the hypothesis that the “one size fits all” approach to corporate governance, particularly the Anglo Saxon model, is not necessarily the right approach from a global perspective. Convergence on fundamental features of shareholder protection, independence of directors and establishment of committees may be the preferred way forward.

Practical implications

The acceptance of a global corporate governance code is limited due to the adaptations in the business environment, investor confidence and corporate successes and failures.

Originality/value

The analysis of the framework provides an interesting paper for corporate governance researchers.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Marlene Davies

Stemming from the need to develop a teaching programme for the delivery of computer auditing/computerised system audit that involved a more hands‐on approach, this…

Abstract

Stemming from the need to develop a teaching programme for the delivery of computer auditing/computerised system audit that involved a more hands‐on approach, this research describes the identification and creation of a case study, workbook and a spreadsheet of source data for students. Results indicate that students prefer using the computer‐based case study to learn practical auditing techniques.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2009

Alison Lane and Elaine Shellard

All accountants make extensive use of information technology (IT) in their working lives, and IT skills have long been part of the Accounting and Finance undergraduate…

Abstract

All accountants make extensive use of information technology (IT) in their working lives, and IT skills have long been part of the Accounting and Finance undergraduate degree programme at the University of Glamorgan. This degree scheme was redesigned on a linear basis with effect from September 2002; one of the major changes being to integrate the teaching of management accounting and IT at the introductory level. The teaching of management accounting lends itself well to the use of IT. This paper describes both the rationale behind, and the design and development of, a case study which aims to integrate the use of IT with the development and application of management accounting techniques. The case study attempts to emulate a “ive” work‐based environment as closely as possible. Completion of tasks at intervals throughout the year form part of the assessment of the module. These are based on data from a variety of sources which students manipulate, using various software packages, in order to produce useful management accounting information. In this way, students learn both management accounting and IT skills, and how to apply these skills to provide management accounting information. The experiences of both students and staff in using the case study over a six‐year period are reported, together with a description of how the case study and its use have evolved in light of the experience.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2017

Eva Tutchell and John Edmonds

Abstract

Details

The Stalled Revolution: Is Equality for Women an Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-602-0

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2018

Marlene Amanda Holmner and Theo J.D. Bothma

The Department of Information Science at the University of Pretoria (UP), with funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, has, for the past six years, offered a…

Abstract

Purpose

The Department of Information Science at the University of Pretoria (UP), with funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, has, for the past six years, offered a fully funded specialized two-year coursework degree at Masters’ level in Information Technology (M.IT degree). The purpose of this paper is to discuss the technological and teaching methodologies as well as the unique advantages and challenges of collaboration between four partner institutions on two continents as well as local industry partners and local and international academic and public libraries, in offering a blended learning program to students from six different countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The contribution is based on a pragmatic and reflective analysis of the success of the strategic partnerships formed during the M.IT program. The data-gathering instrument used was a questionnaire containing open-ended questions.

Findings

Analysis of the comments shows that it is evident that faculty still prefer face-to-face classes. Furthermore, to experience an effective online blended learning, the technology would have to improve. The complicated levels of partnerships were important to provide the necessary expertise for this broad-based program. Lecturers from industries and libraries brought different perspectives based on their day-to-day work and practical experience and, through this, a level of reality as opposed to the theory that can be learnt from textbooks.

Originality/value

This is a descriptive analysis of the program and feedback of co-workers that has not been reported before.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2014

Marlene Morrison

This chapter provides a retrospective and prospective exploration of some of the challenges faced by doctoral education, specifically as they relate to advanced studies of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a retrospective and prospective exploration of some of the challenges faced by doctoral education, specifically as they relate to advanced studies of educational administration (EA).

Methodology

It applies a critical stance to the current status of knowledge in the ‘leadership field’ and the intellectual underpinnings that inform the studies available as reference for doctoral students.

Findings

Nested within wider changing conditions for university and doctoral education, it is argued that the published field as currently constituted suffers from both banal and ‘non-wicked’ leadership orthodoxies that might lead to doctoral stagnation.

Practical implications

Reasons are suggested and prospects considered for revitalising scholarship for the upcoming generation of EA alumni, scholars and practitioners.

Details

Investing in our Education: Leading, Learning, Researching and the Doctorate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-131-2

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Glenn C Parry, Saara A. Brax, Roger S. Maull and Irene C. L. Ng

Improvement of reverse supply chains requires accurate and timely information about the patterns of consumption. In the consumer context, the ways to generate and access…

Abstract

Purpose

Improvement of reverse supply chains requires accurate and timely information about the patterns of consumption. In the consumer context, the ways to generate and access such use-visibility data are in their infancy. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how the Internet of Things (IoT) may be operationalised in the domestic setting to capture data on a consumer’s use of products and the implications for reverse supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an explorative case approach drawing on data from studies of six UK households. “Horizontal” data, which reveals patterns in consumers’ use processes, is generated by combining “vertical” data from multiple sources. Use processes in the homes are mapped using IDEF0 and illustrated with the data. The quantitative data are generated using wireless sensors in the home, and qualitative data are drawn from online calendars, social media, interviews and ethnography.

Findings

The study proposes four generic measurement categories for operationalising the concept of use-visibility: experience, consumption, interaction and depletion, which together address the use of different household resources. The explorative case demonstrates how these measures can be operationalised to achieve visibility of the context of use in the home. The potential of such use-visibility for reverse supply chains is discussed.

Research limitations/implications

This explorative case study is based on an in-depth study of the bathroom which illustrates the application of use-visibility measures (UVMs) but provides a limited use context. Further research is needed from a wider set of homes and a wider set of use processes and contexts.

Practical implications

The case demonstrates the operationalisation of the combination of data from different sources and helps answer questions of “why?”, “how?”, “when?” and “how much?”, which can inform reverse supply chains. The four UVMs can be operationalised in a way that can contribute to supply chain visibility, providing accurate and timely information of consumption, optimising resource use and eliminating waste.

Originality/value

IDEF0 framework and case analysis is used to identify and validate four UVMs available through IoT data – that of experience, consumption, interaction and depletion. The UVMs characterise IoT data generated from a given process and inform the primary reverse flow in the future supply chain. They provide the basis for future data collection and development of theory around their effect on reverse supply chain efficiency.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Eleanor Peters

Abstract

Details

The Use and Abuse of Music: Criminal Records
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-002-8

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Gina Grandy

The purpose of this paper is to extend the notion of strategic leadership, that which has been primarily applied to for profit organizations, to nonprofits, specifically…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the notion of strategic leadership, that which has been primarily applied to for profit organizations, to nonprofits, specifically the church setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a case study methodology and draws primarily upon qualitative data collected from interviews and observation.

Findings

The findings reveal that over the past several years, the organization and its members have undergone a number of incremental and more radical changes. Much of this change has been attributed to the vision and leadership style of the current leader. Four key themes illuminate the processes and content of change under this strategic leader, including unsettlingly the status quo, model of shared leadership, shared vision and culture of community and learning.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based upon one case study site and this limits the generalizability of the research. In addition, exposure to the organization was limited to short periods of time on-site and the sample size was relatively small.

Practical implications

Achieving success in nonprofits requires leaders to have an intimate understanding of the complex nature of stakeholder relations and measuring success needs to be multi-dimensional in nature and linked directly to the mission and context of the organization, rather than based solely on generic measures.

Originality/value

There is limited research to date that examines the applicability of leadership theories that have been traditionally applied to for profit and public sector organizations to nonprofits. The research extends the notion of strategic leadership from the for profit setting to nonprofit organizations generally, and more specifically to the church setting.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Aleksandar Bozic

This study aims to enhance the understanding of the nature of collaboration between public and nonpublic actors in delivering social services and achieving social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to enhance the understanding of the nature of collaboration between public and nonpublic actors in delivering social services and achieving social innovation in a fragile context, with an emphasis on the role of civil society organisations (CSOs). The paper focuses on Bosnia and Herzegovina, a Southeastern European country which has faced a turbulent post-conflict transition and experienced challenges in its social welfare policy and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses institutional theory, particularly new institutionalism and institutional networking, as a lens through which to understand public and nonpublic collaboration and social innovation within a fragile context. This study adopts a sequential mixed-method approach. Data were derived from 15 semi-structured interviews with representatives from local CSOs, international donors and public institutions, as well as a survey of 120 CSO representatives.

Findings

The collaboration and social innovation in a fragile welfare context have been initiated primarily by nonpublic actors and developed within the triple context of relations between public, civil and foreign donors’ organisations. In such a context, coercive, normative and mimetic isomorphisms act as leading drivers, but also as potential barriers of public–nonpublic collaboration and social innovation. They are triggered by influences from multiple actors, challenging power relations and external pressures on local CSOs.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the growing research interest in the role of nonpublic actors in the provision of public services and public social innovation, but examines these issues from the perspective of a fragile context, which has thus far been overlooked in the literature.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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