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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Ziqiang Han, Marla Petal and Qiang Zhang

156

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Briony Towers and Marla Petal

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Miguel Angel Trejo-Rangel, Victor Marchezini, Daniel Adres Rodriguez and Melissa da Silva Oliveira

The objective of this study was to investigate how participatory 3D mapping can promote local intergenerational engagement for disaster risk reduction.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study was to investigate how participatory 3D mapping can promote local intergenerational engagement for disaster risk reduction.

Design/methodology/approach

This investigation was carried out in the city of São Luiz do Paraitinga, Brazil, where a low-cost participatory 3D model (P3DM) was used together with secondary methods (semi-structured interviews, round tables, discussions and presentations) to engage three local focus groups (the general public, high school employees and children) to visualize and interpret local hazards, vulnerabilities, capacities and risk mitigation measures.

Findings

Participants played with a 3D model, using it to express their memories about land use changes in the city and to share their knowledge about past disasters with children that have not faced them. They identified the impacts of the previous disasters and came up with proposals of risk mitigation measures, mostly non-structural.

Originality/value

When applied in a way that allows spontaneous and open public participation, the participatory 3D model can be a type of disaster imagination game that gives voice to oral histories, local knowledge, and which permits the intergenerational engagement for disaster risk reduction.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Yi Lu, Lai Wei, Binxin Cao and Jianqiang Li

Disaster risk reduction (DRR) researchers and practitioners have found that schools can play a critical role in DRR education, with many Non-Governmental Organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

Disaster risk reduction (DRR) researchers and practitioners have found that schools can play a critical role in DRR education, with many Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) developing initiatives to actively involve children in DRR education programs. This paper reports on a case study on an innovative Chinese NGO school-based program focused on participatory child-centered DRR (PCC-DRR) education, from which a PCC-DRR education framework was developed so that similar programs could be replicated, especially in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

After nearly a year of research involving follow-up interviews, fieldwork and secondary data collection from annual reports, news reports and official websites, a case study was conducted on the PCC-DRR education program developed by the One Foundation (OF), a resource-rich NGO in China, that focused on its education strategies and project practice in Ya'an following the 2013 Lushan earthquake.

Findings

Based on constructivist theory, the OF developed a PCC-DRR education program that had four specific branches: teacher capacity building, child DRR education, campus risk management and campus safety culture, which was then implemented in 115 schools and consequently evaluated as being highly effective.

Originality/value

The innovative OF PCC-DRR education program adds to theoretical and practical DRR education research as a “best practice” case. Because the proposed framework is child-centered, participatory and collaborative, it provides excellent guidance and reference for countries seeking to develop school-based DRR education programs.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

Elizabeth McAdams Ducy and Laura M. Stough

This paper describes the educational experiences of children and youth (aged 3–20) with disabilities during school closures resulting from the 2017 Northern California…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes the educational experiences of children and youth (aged 3–20) with disabilities during school closures resulting from the 2017 Northern California wildfires. Students with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to the adverse impacts of disaster, yet the effects of school closures on these children remains understudied. This study identifies considerations for students with disabilities and their families post-disaster.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive, qualitative approach was used for the study design, methodology and analysis. In-depth interviews were conducted with parents of 14 students with disabilities about their experiences during and following school closures. All of these children had missed between a week and over a month of school as a result of the wildfires. Thematic analysis was used to code data and identify four themes present across the data.

Findings

Our findings indicate that children and youth with disabilities experienced disruptions in school-based services; lost previously acquired skills; exhibited negative health and behavioral issues; had difficulties adapting to new, unfamiliar routines and were saddened by lost social connections. Additionally, findings pinpoint the importance of social connections while schools were closed, the benefits of resuming school which included access to responsive school staff, as well as challenges faced by children with disabilities and their families once schools reopened.

Originality/value

Families of children with disabilities, as illustrated in this study, often must transverse a different post-disaster landscape. Schools should assist them in navigating that landscape so students with disabilities can experience a more equitable return to education post-disaster.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Cassandra R. Davis, Sarah R. Cannon and Sarah C. Fuller

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools and discuss approaches to improving recovery efforts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools and discuss approaches to improving recovery efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with 20 school districts in Texas and North Carolina after Hurricanes Harvey (2017) and Matthew (2016). In total, 115 interviews were conducted with teachers, principals, district superintendents and representatives from state education agencies. Interview questions focused on the impact of storms and strategies for recovery.

Findings

The authors uncovered three long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools: (1) constrained instructional time, (2) increased social-emotional needs and (3) the need to support educators.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on two storms, in two states, in two successive years. Data collection occurred in Texas, one academic year after the storm. As compared to the North Carolina, data collection occurred almost two academic years after the storm.

Practical implications

This paper illuminates strategies for stakeholders to implement and expedite hurricane recovery through; (1) updating curricula plans, (2) providing long-term counselors and (3) supporting educators in and out of school.

Originality/value

To date, very few studies have explored the ways in which schools face long-term impacts following a disaster. This paper provides insight to the challenges that prolong the impacts of disasters and impede recovery in schools. With hurricanes and related disasters continuing to affect schooling communities, more research is needed to identify the best ways to support schools, months to years after an event.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2015

Ilene C. Wasserman

This chapter explores recent shifts from diagnostic to more dialogic, relational, and emergent OD practices and poses the question: How is diversity and inclusion integral…

Abstract

This chapter explores recent shifts from diagnostic to more dialogic, relational, and emergent OD practices and poses the question: How is diversity and inclusion integral to Dialogic OD and how do Dialogic OD practices support the goals of diversity and inclusion? Dialogic OD practices turn our attention to the deeply embedded patterns that we may otherwise take for granted, foster a readiness to disrupt these patterns, and enable a shift to alternative and perhaps more inclusive narratives. My focus is on how the dialogic and communication perspectives address systemic forces that maintain undesirable prevailing narratives and build the capacity to create more inclusive communities.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-018-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2022

Morgan Mowatt, Mandeep Kaur Mucina, Gina Mowatt, Josephine Simone and Shilo Shiv Suleman

Indigenous and racialized people have suffered multifaceted dispossession as a result of ongoing and historical violence by the Canadian state. Most greatly affected are…

Abstract

Indigenous and racialized people have suffered multifaceted dispossession as a result of ongoing and historical violence by the Canadian state. Most greatly affected are Indigenous gender-queer and nonbinary people, who have been erased by law and policy and are targets of violence; Indigenous women, who are targeted by gender discrimination and violence; and Indigenous children, who continue to be removed from their communities. Nonwhite or racialized migrants to Canada are victims of the same colonial project, which relies on the slavery of Black and Brown bodies and Orientalist constructions that portray the West as “superior” in relation to the “barbaric” East. This dispossession, oppression, and violence are met by a constellation of local and global approaches to resist, heal, and create Fearless futures for Indigenous and racialized people.

Through collaborative storytelling, this chapter centers a radical project focused on resistance to gender violence, reconnection to land and body, Indigenous and settler solidarity, storytelling and witnessing, and healing through art. These efforts, including multiple community workshops and mural projects with Indigenous and racialized women, as well as queer and two-spirit people and youth, have recentered Indigenous healing and medicine, promoted intergenerational teachings, fostered intercommunity relationship building and solidarities through stories and witnessing, reconnected disconnected Indigenous peoples (both local and settler) to their bodies, lands, and communities, and unsettled colonial mentalities on gender and Indigeneity publicly and privately. This project was a collaboration between The Fearless Collective, based in South Asia, the Innovative Young Indigenous Leaders Symposium, based in British Columbia, Canada, and research from the School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria, British Columbia.

Details

Decolonizing and Indigenizing Visions of Educational Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-468-5

Keywords

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