Search results

1 – 10 of 15
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Marla Hacker

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most…

Downloads
2713

Abstract

Management and scholars have been searching for the determinants of project team performance for many years. Individual characteristics and intra‐team processes are most often hypothesized to influence team performance. To date, though, we still do not really understand why some teams perform better than other teams. Studies have provided mixed findings and inconclusive results. The study described in this article continues the search for variables that influence project team performance. The findings provide support for an increasingly, albeit controversial, discussion occurring within human resource circles, concerning the impact of top performers on team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Marla Hacker and Marvin Washington

How do you evaluate the implementation of large‐scale organizational change? As more organizations are implementing large‐scale improvement efforts, this has become a…

Downloads
2761

Abstract

How do you evaluate the implementation of large‐scale organizational change? As more organizations are implementing large‐scale improvement efforts, this has become a vital question for organizations. The importance of this question is underscored by the fact that the literature is filled with articles that suggest that many of these projects fail. In this paper, we provide a tool that can be used to measure the implementation of large‐scale improvement efforts and then we demonstrate how we used this tool to assess the implementation of a performance management system in the government of Botswana. We end with three benefits of using a large‐scale evaluation survey tool: (1) it provides hard data on large‐scale implementation; (2) it helps to de‐politicize situations caused by the stress of undergoing a large change; and (3) it provides management with a tool to help them understand how their organization is functioning.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Marvin Washington and Marla Hacker

The concepts of joint optimization and socio‐technical systems have been in the literature for over 40 years. However, efforts to operationalize these concepts for…

Abstract

The concepts of joint optimization and socio‐technical systems have been in the literature for over 40 years. However, efforts to operationalize these concepts for managerial practice have not progressed at the same pace as the theory on joint optimization has advanced. This paper represents an effort to turn the theoretical concept of joint optimization into managerial practice by introducing the concept of system equivalence. In this paper system equivalence (the level at which all three systems (social, technical, and environmental) are mutually equivalent in value (is described to indicate how it should be used. This paper then discusses the usefulness of this concept for managerial practice.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Marla Hacker and Karen Garst

Performance measurement is now commonplace in the private sector. The early focus on financial results has expanded to include measurement of customer satisfaction…

Downloads
1274

Abstract

Performance measurement is now commonplace in the private sector. The early focus on financial results has expanded to include measurement of customer satisfaction, business processes, and opportunities for learning and growth. With the increased scrutiny on public and not‐for‐profit organizations to demonstrate measurable results, private sector measurement techniques have been borrowed and applied to these enterprises. The Oregon State Bar (OSB) is the only state bar association in the USA that is known to have pursued a rigorous focus on measurable results for its programs and services. This case study is designed to examine the measures in place for services to sections (special interest groups) within the OSB and recommend improvements. Research on goal setting theory, process management, survey design, and implementation strategies have been used to underpin the case study. The study will show that multiple indicators are necessary at various points in time during the year in order to measure fully whether the desired results are on track for the year.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 January 2003

Toni L. Doolen and Marla E. Hacker

Time to market, product quality, and product complexity are key organizational drivers. Many organizations have responded to these pressures by creating teams. While teams…

Abstract

Time to market, product quality, and product complexity are key organizational drivers. Many organizations have responded to these pressures by creating teams. While teams provide the right mix of personnel to respond to business and technical challenges faced by the organization, many organizations have failed to adjust their organizational processes, culture, and systems to create a context where teams can thrive. Identifying the key changes needed to support teams can be a daunting task. The ultimate goal of this research is the development of a tool that will allow organizational leaders to gain a better understanding of what organizational factors should be considered in designing an environment that will enable teams to perform at an optimal level. Previous research findings and semi-structured interviews of organizational leaders were used to develop a framework for studying these organizational processes, culture, and systems. A survey was developed to measure these different characteristics of the parent organization. Findings from the initial interviews and a pilot study utilizing the survey are summarized.

Details

Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-981-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Marvin Washington and Marla Hacker

This paper aims to examine the relationship between managers' understanding of a specific organizational change process and their attitudes towards implementing the change.

Downloads
9247

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between managers' understanding of a specific organizational change process and their attitudes towards implementing the change.

Design/methodology/approach

After a review of the current literature on the link between organizational change, knowledge of the change, and attitudes towards implementing the change, limited research was found that examined the relationship between knowledge of change and resistance to change. Then original empirical research was conducted by administering a survey to 296 managers from the Botswana Government.

Findings

The results of the regression models suggest that managers who understand the change effort are more likely to be less resistant to change. Specifically, the more a manager understood the change, the more likely they were to be excited about the change, the less likely that they would think the change effort would fail, and the less likely they were to state that they wished their organization had never implemented the change.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of our research is that the data are self‐reported. The managers themselves rated their knowledge of the change and their resistance or lack of resistance to the change. However, because the question is one where social desirability bias (a major concern of self‐reported data) would lead to no variance (all managers should have said that they understood the change) and the self‐report bias is minimal. The research implications are that a link between knowledge of the organizational change has been found, and resistance to change, adding to the literature on why individuals resist change.

Practical implications

The practical implications is that senior managers need to focus more on developing checks to ensure that managers understand the change program and the implications of the change program as a way of ensuring that they, and their subordinates, understand the change program.

Originality/value

The value of the study is that it is one of the first studies to empirically show a link between knowledge of change and resistance to change. The originality of the study is the dataset (managers from the public sector in Botswana) and the application (managers attempting to implement total quality techniques in a large‐scale bureaucracy).

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Marla E. Hacker, Tim Kotnour and Larry A. Mallak

The linkage between strategic planning and daily activities within an organization is often obscure. Perhaps as a consequence, many well‐developed strategic plans fail to…

Downloads
1661

Abstract

The linkage between strategic planning and daily activities within an organization is often obscure. Perhaps as a consequence, many well‐developed strategic plans fail to be implemented, and required goals and objectives are not attained. Strategy deployment processes link strategic plans with implementation activities. Instead of investing more time and energy in improving planning or implementation processes, an organization should first examine the deployment processes used to link strategic plans with action – “deployment processes” may be the missing link in the strategic management system. This paper studies the application of formal strategy deployment processes within three US federal agencies. The strategic management literature provides the basis for the deployment processes analyzed in this study. Following the analysis of each individual case, an overall assessment of existing supporting and restraining forces that should be considered when working to improve deployment processes is discussed.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Marla E. Hacker and Jonathan D. Lang

Discusses the process and issues involved in developing a performance measurement system for a virtual engineering team working within a high technology environment. This…

Downloads
2119

Abstract

Discusses the process and issues involved in developing a performance measurement system for a virtual engineering team working within a high technology environment. This team consists of members from many different sites across the world with a unique role in maintaining standardized manufacturing processes at the lowest possible cost. As a result, they faced many challenges including communication barriers, culture differences, as well as different reporting structures within each individual site. To help address these issues, a performance measurement system was developed to focus the team on the key actions affecting performance instead of the issues getting in the way. A measurement system was developed that linked the team’s objectives to its mission and identified the critical actions associated with each objective.

Details

International Journal of Agile Management Systems, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1465-4652

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Budiman Saleh, Marla Hacker and Sabah Randhawa

This paper presents an integrated framework for the selection of attributes used in the evaluation of advanced manufacturing systems. The primary focus in the development…

Downloads
1655

Abstract

This paper presents an integrated framework for the selection of attributes used in the evaluation of advanced manufacturing systems. The primary focus in the development of this framework is the modularity of the framework so that it is applicable to a wide range of advanced manufacturing systems with differing process configurations and technologies. Based on data collected from industry and the current body of knowledge, decision attributes were identified and ranked relatively against each other, forming a hierarchy of decision attributes. To simplify the hierarchy, making it more user‐friendly in real‐world applications, each decision attribute was also evaluated relative to the strength of its relationships to other decision attributes. Several decision attributes were found to be highly correlated with others, resulting in a new, single decision attribute. The final decision attribute hierarchy provides managers responsible for making capital decisions involving advanced manufacturing technologies with a framework for their decision making.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Dwi Larso, Toni Doolen and Marla Hacker

The ability of production organizations to respond quickly to changes in the market with new products requires flexibility. The relationship between manufacturing…

Downloads
1286

Abstract

Purpose

The ability of production organizations to respond quickly to changes in the market with new products requires flexibility. The relationship between manufacturing flexibility and the performance of organizations in new product development is not well characterized. The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a flexibility model focused on new product performance in manufacturing organizations empirically in one industrial sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypothesized relationships between manufacturing flexibility, new product type, and new product performance are empirically tested using survey data from 273 companies, representing a range of US electronic manufacturers.

Findings

Factor and cluster analysis identifies eight distinct flexibility dimensions and a hierarchy among these dimensions. The relationships between the identified flexibility dimensions and new product performance, as tested through correlation analyses, are found to be dependent on the type of new product development.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, this study highlights the complexity of the relationship between manufacturing flexibility and new product performance. This study is conducted in a specific sector, so the results cannot be generalized. More complex mathematical models, requiring a larger data set, would be helpful in further separating out direct and indirect effects of variables, such as new product type, on the relationship between flexibility and performance.

Practical implications

With multiple dimensions of flexibility, organizational leaders must choose the dimension(s) that is/are most appropriate to develop. This study helps provide insight into which dimensions of flexibility a particular plant should focus on, given a particular type of new product.

Originality/value

The study has made a significant contribution by identifying the dimensions of flexibility related to new product performance and in proposing a hierarchical structure for these dimensions. This study has also made a contribution by providing empirical support for the role of new product type as a moderator in the flexibility/performance relationship.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 15