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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Marla B. Royne, Jeff Thieme, Marian Levy, Jared Oakley and Laura Alderson

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the need for appropriate green marketing communication strategies to close the gap between consumers’ strong environmental concerns…

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3268

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the need for appropriate green marketing communication strategies to close the gap between consumers’ strong environmental concerns and weak engagement in sustainable behaviors. In doing so, our overarching goal is to provide new direction for creating targeted marketing communication strategies that will more effectively motivate consumer purchasing of green products and services.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a survey approach to collect data and regression analysis to test our hypotheses.

Findings

The findings suggest that demographic variables (gender, ethnicity and age) as well as concern for waste, concern for health and concern for environmental technology influence five different categories of sustainable behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that future studies should consider multiple dimensions of environmental concern because each dimension has a different impact on sustainable behaviors.

Practical implications

The findings contribute to the continued development of a green consumer profile and highlight the need for marketers to carefully select appropriate dimensions of environmental concern to emphasize in their communication strategies. Results also reinforce the need to consider demographics in targeted communications.

Originality/value

This study considers the impact of different dimensions of environmental concern and demographic variables on different types of sustainable behaviors.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Claudia A. Rademaker and Marla B. Royne

Knowledge about what drives managers to make more sustainable media decisions is important, as it can influence communication effectiveness, especially in countries with…

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1430

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge about what drives managers to make more sustainable media decisions is important, as it can influence communication effectiveness, especially in countries with strong green consumption preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine corporate environmental policies and personal green attitudes of managers in the media selection process as potential influencers of marketing managers’ green thought, driving corporate sustainability.

Findings

The findings show that managers’ personal green attitudes are an internal driver of corporate sustainability with regard to more sustainable media decisions, while corporate environmental policies are not.

Practical implications

These findings highlight the importance of recruiting marketing managers with strong green personal profiles, particularly companies with a green profile. Results also suggest companies use environmental policies in all managerial decisions, including marketing communications decisions such as media selection.

Social implications

This research begins the process of understanding what drives marketing managers in their green thinking and related managerial decisions. With today’s growing focus on the environment, this knowledge is increasingly important, so companies can be aligned with the increasing number of eco-conscious consumers who purchase products based on corporate communications and green corporate decisions.

Originality/value

Where previous research found that the lack of commitment among company’s owners and the inability of suppliers to comply with the company’s sustainable policies are barriers of corporate sustainability, the current study found that this is the case even for marketing managers through the non-use of corporate green policies in marketing decisions and those with weak personal green attitudes.

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Marla B. Royne, Jeff Thieme and Marian Levy

The purpose of this paper is to identify how five factors (environmental involvement, environmental concern, financial motivations, social motivations and energy concern…

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986

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how five factors (environmental involvement, environmental concern, financial motivations, social motivations and energy concern motivations) motivate individuals to engage in pro-environmental behaviors (curtailment, capital investment behaviors and food-related behaviors).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey approach is used to collect data, and regression analysis is used to answer the research question.

Findings

Results show that social motivations are positively associated with all three behaviors such as environmental involvement, Environmental Concern and Energy Concern Motivations are positively associated with some behaviors; and Financial Motivations are not associated with any behaviors examined in this study.

Research limitations/implications

These results highlight the widespread impact of social motivations, the more specific impact of environmental involvement, environmental concern and energy concern motivations, and the lack of impact of financial motivations on these three distinct pro-environmental behaviors.

Practical implications

Given that social motivation is so strong and pervasive across all three categories of pro-environmental behaviors, leadership in encouraging a dialogue/debate around these issues is needed from all stakeholders, including government, industry leaders, think tanks and environmental organizations.

Originality/value

This study incorporates multiple factors that have differing impact on three distinct pro-environmental behaviors.

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Devika Vashisht, Marla B. Royne and Sreejesh S.

Advergames, or integrated brand messages within digital games, have received considerable attention from researchers and practitioners. Despite increased use of advergames…

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1739

Abstract

Purpose

Advergames, or integrated brand messages within digital games, have received considerable attention from researchers and practitioners. Despite increased use of advergames as a brand promotion strategy by a range of well-known brands, limited understanding exists about a number of issues related to the effective use of such games. This paper aims to critically review the literature on advergames by performing a detailed analysis of existing research in this area and propose an organizing framework. Based on this framework, the authors discuss key issues with current understanding and propose important questions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

This literature review follows Webster and Watson’s (2002) concept-driven systematic review methodology elaborating on the key antecedents and consequences identified in advergame studies (what we know: current knowledge), followed by the discussion of key factors that should be investigated as antecedents and consequences (literature gaps).

Findings

This paper presents a review and synthesis of advergame studies based on Terlutter and Capella’s (2013) integrated marketing communication framework. It identifies game, individual and social factors and suggests how these factors could affect a consumer’s brand-related cognitive, attitudinal and behavioral responses. The authors further propose an advergame framework that identifies two different “unit of analysis” (antecedents and consequences of game factors and antecedents and consequences of individual and social factors), which can be used by scholars to center their research efforts in a more detailed fashion.

Research limitations/implications

Research questions posed in this literature review indicate that future research in the area of advergames should focus on investigating the effects of various game, individual and social factors on consumers’ cognitive, affective and behavioral responses.

Practical implications

The advergame framework provided here provides firms with a guide to the factors that may affect their consumers’ cognitive, affective and behavioral responses and helps them in developing effective advergames.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive review of the advergame literature that has not been done before and develops a general advergame framework that can be applied in all contexts and will guide future studies in the area. Overall, the study helps the researchers to identify critical issues and concepts related to advergames and shapes future research in the field.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Subhash Jha, M.S. Balaji, Marla B. Royne Stafford and Nancy Spears

This paper aims to examine the effects of purchase environment, product type and need for touch (NFT) on cognitive response, affective response and overall product…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effects of purchase environment, product type and need for touch (NFT) on cognitive response, affective response and overall product evaluation in the USA and India.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were conducted in two different consumer markets. In Study 1, participants evaluated haptic and non-haptic products and gave responses on cognitive response, affective response and overall product evaluation measures in the US market. In Study 2, the authors replicate Study 1 in a culturally different market of India and extend Study 1 by examining the moderating role of instrumental and autotelic dimensions of NFT on the effect of purchase environment on cognitive and affective responses.

Findings

Research findings suggest that cognitive and affective responses are the underlying mechanism between the purchase environment and overall response only for haptic product among Indian consumers. In contrast, affective response is the underlying mechanism explaining this relationship among US consumers. Furthermore, the instrumental dimension of NFT moderates the impact of purchase environment on cognitive but the autotelic NFT moderates the effect of purchase environment on affective response only for the haptic product but not for the non-haptic product.

Research limitations/implications

The study uses a relatively homogenous sample in the Indian market in contrast to the US market.

Practical implications

Results advance the understanding of the importance of haptic information processing in consumer decision-making across different purchase environments, product types and NFT using psychological distance (proximity) as a theoretical underpinning. With non-haptic shopping environments (i.e. online and mobile) growing rapidly, the results have critical implications for development of marketing strategies in Asian and US markets.

Originality/value

Empirical research examining the underlying mechanism by which purchase environment influences overall evaluation for haptic product is scarce. Additionally, understanding of the differential roles of instrumental and autotelic dimensions of NFT on cognitive and affective responses is very limited. This research fills this void and provides an understanding of the specific environment in evaluating haptic and non-haptic products in two distinct markets.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Alexa K. Fox, George D. Deitz, Marla B. Royne and Joseph D. Fox

Online consumer reviews (OCRs) have emerged as a particularly important type of user-generated information about a brand because of their widespread adoption and influence…

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1633

Abstract

Purpose

Online consumer reviews (OCRs) have emerged as a particularly important type of user-generated information about a brand because of their widespread adoption and influence on consumer decision-making. Much of the existing OCR research focuses on quantifiable OCR features such as star ratings and volume. More research that examines the influence of review elements, aside from numeric ratings, such as the verbatim text, particularly in services contexts is needed. The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of service failures on consumer arousal and emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present three behavioral experiments that manipulate service failure and linguistic elements of OCRs by using galvanic skin response, survey measures and automated facial expression analysis.

Findings

Negative OCRs lead to the greatest levels of arousal when consumers read OCRs. Service failure severity impacts anger, and referential cohesion, an observable property of text that helps a reader better understand ideas in the text, negatively moderates the relationship between service failure severity and anger.

Originality/value

The authors are among the first to empirically test the effect of emotional contagion in a user-generated content context, demonstrating that it can occur when consumers read such content, even if they did not experience the events being described. The research uses a self-report and physiological measures to assess consumer perceptions, arousal and emotions related to service failures, increasing the robustness of the literature. These findings contribute to the marketing literature on OCRs in service failures, physiological measures of consumers’ emotions, the negativity bias and emotional contagion in a user-generated content context.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Jeff Thieme, Marla B. Royne, Subhash Jha, Marian Levy and Wendy Barnes McEntee

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the mediating factors affecting the relationship between environmental concerns and sustainable behaviors.

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2707

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the mediating factors affecting the relationship between environmental concerns and sustainable behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors survey 467 respondents and use a structural equation modeling approach to assess environmental involvement and willingness to pay more for green products as mediating variables between a multi-dimensional measure of environmental concern and sustainable behaviors.

Findings

The findings suggest that environmental involvement and willingness to pay more for green products mediate the relationship between environmental concern and sustainable behaviors. But of the three dimensions of environmental concern, only concern for energy is statistically significant in the model.

Research limitations/implications

The results empirically validate the multi-dimensionality of the environmental concern construct and its relationship with consumers’ sustainable behaviors. Both involvement and willingness to pay more for an environmentally friendly product play an important role in linking environmental concern to actionable behaviors.

Practical implications

To reach green consumers who are willing to pay more for environmentally friendly products and ultimately engage in sustainable behaviors, marketers should target those consumers who are most concerned with energy and more involved with the environment.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to study the gap between environmental concern and sustainable behaviors by utilizing involvement and willingness to pay more for an environmentally friendly product as mediators. Results provide critical insight into this often elusive gap. The authors also fill an important gap in the literature by including psychological factors driving consumers’ willingness to pay more for green products.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Marian Levy and Marla B. Royne

This paper aims to examine privacy breaches in personal health record information that expose consumers to unsolicited marketing.

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1110

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine privacy breaches in personal health record information that expose consumers to unsolicited marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Examples of: data theft by healthcare workers; sale of consumer health data by entities not covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); and piracy of health data through sophisticated internet targeted marketing.

Findings

This paper finds that HIPAA's strict safeguards to medical privacy are not extended to database companies that aggregate data for electronic medical records, a source of highly profitable information that is purchased by advertisers. Similar health information is obtained by marketers through consumer “health surveys” completed on web‐based health information sites or at community health screenings.

Practical implications

Consumer education is warranted to ensure awareness of privacy breaches and vigilance against loss of personal and protected health information to marketers.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the areas for protecting consumers via identifying loopholes in HIPAA, as well as pointing out consumer behavior that can lead to subtle, yet systematic exploitation of their health information for profit via marketing.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Marla B. Royne and Marian Levy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the success of marketing efforts by large companies that contribute to public health problems.

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2112

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the success of marketing efforts by large companies that contribute to public health problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses current examples of marketing that undermine public health as well as actions of such companies to potentially improve products and ultimately, public health. It offers suggestions on how marketers and public health officials can partner to create a situation where outcomes can be positive for all parties involved.

Findings

Current marketing efforts by corporate giants are hurting the public health. Marketers must team with public health officials to help improve public health through the marketing of healthy lifestyles.

Practical implications

If marketers implement strategies that can combine healthy products with effective marketing communication strategies, they can remain profitable while engaging in socially responsible activities. Consequently, marketers have much to gain by working with the public health profession.

Originality/value

Provides guidance for improving public health by suggesting ways that marketers and public health officials can partner. If such partnerships occur, the population may embrace healthier lifestyles while companies maintain their profitability.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2010

Carol C. Bienstock and Marla B. Royne

The purpose of this paper is to use the technology acceptance model (TAM) from the information technology (IT) literature to investigate the relationships among technology…

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3319

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the technology acceptance model (TAM) from the information technology (IT) literature to investigate the relationships among technology use and acceptance, and perceptions of quality and satisfaction with logistics services among industrial customers.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the proposed model, an online survey was prepared using WebSurveyor and an introductory e‐mail with a link to the survey was sent to a sample of members of two professional organizations of industrial purchasing managers.

Findings

The findings indicate that both logistics service quality (LSQ) perceptions and satisfaction levels are significantly related to future purchase intentions. In addition, LSQ perceptions mediate the relationship between the two TAM constructs and customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper provides additional insight on technology acceptance in the context of logistics and supply chain management. IT is a common thread throughout logistics and supply chain management, from electronic data interchange, through collaborative forecasting and replenishment and vendor‐managed inventory processes. Consequently, extending research on technology acceptance and use into the context of logistics and supply chain management is an important step, both in terms of theory development and managerial relevance for both the information systems and supply chain management disciplines.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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