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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Katrin Martens, Anke Wolff and Markus Hanisch

Against the background of increasing infrastructure loss in many rural areas, this study aims to contribute conceptually and empirically towards better understanding of…

Abstract

Purpose

Against the background of increasing infrastructure loss in many rural areas, this study aims to contribute conceptually and empirically towards better understanding of rural innovation processes related to provision of public goods.

Design/methodology/approach

The nationally focused understanding of innovation processes leads the debate on rural development into a dilemma that this study seeks to sidestep via the concept of social innovation. Community cooperatives – a type of social enterprise that has increasingly emerged in rural areas of Germany in the past decade – offer the opportunity to examine social innovation processes. This cross-case study reveals the broad range of activities in which such cooperatives are active and analyses their social innovation processes.

Findings

The study shows that the social innovation governance framework enables examination of social innovation processes. Although macro-level policy has appeared to be an important instrument for financing social innovation, public actors at the micro-level seem barely able to initiate social innovation processes unless they are also private actors and, therefore, can pursue additional incentives. The social innovations studied here seem to differ in terms of their actor constellations and resource-allocation patterns, depending on whether they are concerned with the establishment or maintenance of local infrastructure. What they have in common, however, is the initiation of formalised collective-action processes that serve to legitimise social innovation.

Originality/value

By applying an analytical framework that is new to the literature on social innovation, the study provides insight into the activities and decision-making processes of actors involved in social innovation in rural areas. In this context, community cooperatives have rarely been studied as an interface between public, private and civil society actors or as a platform for mobilising human, social and financial capital.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Mert Aktaş

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of idiocentrism and allocentrism on person-organization fit, person-job fit and work attitudes relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of idiocentrism and allocentrism on person-organization fit, person-job fit and work attitudes relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 426 employees of a holding company.

Findings

The results reveal that allocentrism makes a difference in fitting the particular aspect of work environment for the individual. Results showed that allocentrism positively moderates person-organization fit and job satisfaction and organizational commitment and turnover relationship. However, no moderating influence of idiocentrism was found on person-organization fit and employee attitude relationship. Furthermore, it was also found that neither idiocentrism nor allocentrism moderated the relationship between the person-job fit and employee attitudes relationship.

Originality/value

This research adds a cultural component to the person-environment fit research.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2017

Christian Karner

Literature on European and national identities displays a tension between occasional observations of an emerging ‘banal Europeanism’ (Cram, 2009) and a dominant strand…

Abstract

Literature on European and national identities displays a tension between occasional observations of an emerging ‘banal Europeanism’ (Cram, 2009) and a dominant strand (e.g. Guibernau, 2007; Toplak & Šumi, 2012) that questions the viability of European identifications vis-à-vis historically entrenched nationalisms, particularly in the context of the debt crisis and the resulting (re)nationalization of European politics. This chapter builds on recent work on Austrian European Union (EU) scepticism and its contestation (Karner, 2013) to examine instances – in diverse media coverage, readers’ letters to the editor of Austria’s most widely read newspaper, internet platforms, political essays and party political positions – of national identity negotiations in relation to the EU and as articulated in the context of successive European crises and the most recent elections to the European Parliament. The qualitative, thematic analysis of these wide-ranging materials developed here draws on two key concepts in critical discourse analysis, the notions of deixis (Billig, 1995) or ‘rhetorical pointing’ and of the topos or ‘structure of argument’ (e.g. Reisigl & Wodak, 2001), which are complemented by a third theoretical tool, namely the anthropological concept of ‘grammars of identity’ (Baumann & Gingrich, 2004). The resulting discussion reveals the uneasy coexistence of (critical) Europeanisms and various national reassertions in Austria’s public sphere and their respective discursive features. Further, the theoretical approaches synthesized cast light on internal diversities within political positions that are often too monolithicly classified as being ‘simply’ pro- or anti-European respectively. Instead, the analysis presented here reveals a spectrum of (at least five) competing positions.

Details

National Identity and Europe in Times of Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-514-6

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Risto Paavola and Petri Hallikainen

The main focus of the requirements engineering (RE) literature has been on the technical aspects related to the RE projects. Research has largely focused on the specific…

Abstract

Purpose

The main focus of the requirements engineering (RE) literature has been on the technical aspects related to the RE projects. Research has largely focused on the specific methods for collecting the requirements for an information system. Much less research has been conducted on the social and collaboration aspects of RE. To fill this gap, this paper aims to study the contribution of social factors, such as social ties, knowledge sharing and flexibility, for successful collaboration in RE teams.

Design/methodology/approach

The research followed the case study methodology. Data were collected from a successful RE and development project in a public sector company in Finland. The model for social collaboration by Kotlarsky and Oshri (2005) was applied as a starting point for analysis, but new concepts emerged during the coding process.

Findings

The results suggest that human-related aspects, such as flexibility, collective knowledge and transactive memory, were important for successful collaborative work in the RE team studied. The results show a clear connection between the collaboration factors in the RE process and the success of the end product.

Originality/value

The article fills a clear gap in the RE literature. It shows that human-related aspects are important in the RE process. This opens up new research avenues, such as investigating the effect of human-related factors on the whole lifecycle of a project.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Shuhong Wang, Steven D Caldwell and Xiang Yi

As Chinese companies move to the world stage of business, they must leverage a more knowledgeable and collaborative workforce to meet new challenges. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

As Chinese companies move to the world stage of business, they must leverage a more knowledgeable and collaborative workforce to meet new challenges. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how two prominent individual attributes, education, and allocentrism, create work tension for human capital practices in Chinese companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveying nearly 500 workers in four Chinese companies and using multi-level methodology.

Findings

The authors found that higher levels of education work to the detriment of employees’ affective organizational commitment (AOC) and positively influence seeking-to-leave behavior. In addition, this study suggests a positive relation between allocentrism and AOC. Personalized leadership, a common leadership style in high-power distance cultures such as China, further exacerbates the problems with higher levels of education and diminishes the commitment benefits of allocentrism. Conversely, regardless of leadership style, if supervisors involve workers in decision-making activities, those workers who are more educated will become more committed to the organization and less likely to leave.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected using self-reported questionnaires, which may cause common method variance. The reliability for personalized leadership was slightly below 0.70. This may be due to the multiple dimensions that are reflected in leadership styles. Another limitation of this study is its focus on allocentrism without considering other personal expression of cultural values. This approach could be too narrow (Gelfand et al., 2007).

Practical implications

This study suggests that members who endorse allocentrism might be more likely to have high-affective commitment. If managers can select individuals high on the allocentrism scale, there is a higher likelihood these individuals will attach emotionally to the organization. Managers should not simply conclude that idiocentrics are “worse” employees than allocentrics. Instead, managers may utilize effective management tactics to cultivate more socialized leadership visions among their supervisors. Finally, the authors find that independent of whether leadership is more or less personalized, managers can retain valued educated workers by including them in decision-making activities.

Social implications

The authors have found that education may serve as a double edged sword for employers. As hypothesized, the findings suggested that employees’ level of education negatively relates to their affective commitment for their organizations. This study also contributes to the knowledge on the role of culture at the individual level (i.e. allocentrism) and how it affects employees’ attitudes and behavior. The authors found that workers who more highly value the group that they function within (allocentrics) tend to be more affectively committed to their organization.

Originality/value

It is one of the first studies to examine educational level and cultural orientation as antecedents to affective commitment, especially in Chinese businesses where workers’ education level is a growing phenomenon and allocentrism is a traditional characteristic of Chinese workers. Also, understanding the dynamics of group-individual linkages is generally most helpful to understanding organizational phenomenon (House et al., 1995). This meso framework is a hallmark feature of the study, given the hierarchical nature of the research inquiry and data set.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Wing Lam and Alton Y.K. Chua

This paper introduces the notion of knowledge outsourcing (KO) where external knowledge providers (KP), rather than internal experts, are contracted to provide knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces the notion of knowledge outsourcing (KO) where external knowledge providers (KP), rather than internal experts, are contracted to provide knowledge services. The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of KO in knowledge management (KM) and the circumstances under which KO is most likely to be successful.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the case study approach, the fieldwork is done at Eduware, an organization that develops and markets e‐learning courseware. Apart from conducting semi‐structured interviews with diverse stakeholders in the organization, archival data from Eduware are collected for triangulation purposes.

Findings

On the basis of the case data, two distinct types of KO relationships have been identified in Eduware. Furthermore, the risks of KO included both product‐related and process‐related ones. Three conditions under which KO are most likely to be successful were: first, a lack of in‐house expertise; second, the availability of suitable external KP; and finally, a favourable business case.

Research limitations/implications

A general process model of KO comprising the following steps is proposed: knowledge needs identification; knowledge sourcing; knowledge services negotiation; knowledge delivery; knowledge services monitoring; and knowledge utilization.

Originality/value

The dawning of a fast‐growing knowledge services industry raises new opportunities for organizations to support their KM initiatives through KO. Hitherto, there have been few works that examine the role of KO. This paper therefore serves to fill this research gap.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Steven Leon and Nizam Uddin

The purpose of this paper is to identify when students choose their major and when students become interested in a career field, to devise a supply chain management (SCM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify when students choose their major and when students become interested in a career field, to devise a supply chain management (SCM) talent outreach strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to undergraduate students in SCM classes, and the responses were explored through multinomial logistic regression analyses.

Findings

The paper revealed that interest in the career field is a major factor in choosing a college degree, among other factors. The timing of when a student chooses a major is influenced by interest in the field and whether or not the student lived abroad. The career field chosen is influenced by race, by whether or not the student lived abroad and by prior experience. Outreach strategies to attract new talent to supply chain-related fields should start prior to a student entering college.

Research limitations/implications

Results are based on a survey research with a limited geographic coverage, and the research is limited to investigating student whose college major is other than SCM, leaving opportunities for further research where the college major is SCM.

Originality/value

The authors provide original findings that improve outreach strategies to attract next generation supply chain talent. They also further the development of theory for the determinants of when a college major is selected and when interest in a career field begins.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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