Search results

1 – 10 of 236
Book part
Publication date: 29 May 2018

Per Andersson and Björn Axelsson

This chapter is a response to observations from previous chapters where we have learnt that the context surrounding B2B sales seem to deviate quite a lot from a…

Abstract

This chapter is a response to observations from previous chapters where we have learnt that the context surrounding B2B sales seem to deviate quite a lot from a traditional market view based on neoclassic theory. In the first part of this chapter, we contrast the two different views of markets and with that as our reference point, we discuss some general implications for marketing, sales, and purchasing.

The chapter looks deeper into a “markets-as-networks” perspective and argues that such lenses applied on marketing and sales activities in business markets will have implications on ways to organize marketing and sales. Actors, activities, and resources are embedded into structures (activity, actor, and resource structures), and it is important to have a reasonable sense of what and how these structures look in order to make the best priorities for the short- and long-term success of the business.

The chapter addresses how the market system surrounding the supplier–customer interchange contributes to setting the scene for operating exchange processes. Five general network themes and challenges for sales and marketing have been identified and explored. Against these, the chapter puts organizational issues in focus. Two aspects are in focus of this concluding discussion: first, organizational variety and ongoing processes of organizational adaptation, and second, coordination and communication.

Details

Organizing Marketing and Sales
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-969-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Ricardo Madureira

This paper illuminates the distinction between individual and organizational actors in business-to-business markets as well as the coexistence of formal and informal…

Abstract

This paper illuminates the distinction between individual and organizational actors in business-to-business markets as well as the coexistence of formal and informal mechanisms of coordination in multinational corporations. The main questions addressed include the following. (1) What factors influence the occurrence of personal contacts of foreign subsidiary managers in industrial multinational corporations? (2) How such personal contacts enable coordination in industrial markets and within multinational firms? The theoretical context of the paper is based on: (1) the interaction approach to industrial markets, (2) the network approach to industrial markets, and (3) the process approach to multinational management. The unit of analysis is the foreign subsidiary manager as the focal actor of a contact network. The paper is empirically focused on Portuguese sales subsidiaries of Finnish multinational corporations, which are managed by either a parent country national (Finnish), a host country national (Portuguese) or a third country national. The paper suggests eight scenarios of individual dependence and uncertainty, which are determined by individual, organizational, and/or market factors. Such scenarios are, in turn, thought to require personal contacts with specific functions. The paper suggests eight interpersonal roles of foreign subsidiary managers, by which the functions of their personal contacts enable inter-firm coordination in industrial markets. In addition, the paper suggests eight propositions on how the functions of their personal contacts enable centralization, formalization, socialization and horizontal communication in multinational corporations.

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Filipe J. Sousa

This paper exposes the development of markets-as-networks theory from formal inception in the mid-1970s until 2010 state-of-the-art, en route presenting its historical…

Abstract

This paper exposes the development of markets-as-networks theory from formal inception in the mid-1970s until 2010 state-of-the-art, en route presenting its historical roots. This largely European-based theory challenges the conventional, dichotomous view of the business world as including firms and markets, arguing for the existence of relational governance structures (the so-called “interfirm cooperation”) in addition to hierarchical and transactional ones.

Details

Organizational Culture, Business-to-Business Relationships, and Interfirm Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-306-5

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Peter Ekman, Peter Thilenius and Torbjörn Windahl

Research has shown that companies focus their internal processes when they adopt enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. However, the ERP systems need to expand their…

2128

Abstract

Purpose

Research has shown that companies focus their internal processes when they adopt enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. However, the ERP systems need to expand their functionality to include customers and suppliers (with e-commerce functionality) to reach their full potential. The purpose of this paper is to consider business relationships as a resource but also a limitation when companies strive to get an extended ERP system.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an illustrative case study of an industrial company's process of developing an extended ERP and how the company's portfolio of business relationships has affected the solution. The analysis is supported by the markets-as-networks theory.

Findings

The process of developing an extended ERP system needs to incorporate the company's business partners (customers and suppliers). It is a simultaneously bottom-up and top-down process given that the operative frontline staff hold the knowledge about the company's business relationships while the corporate management has the means of extending the ERP system functionality and align it with the focal company's strategy.

Research limitations/implications

Companies need to consider the fact that the technological and financial status of their customers and suppliers differ. Thus, an effective and flexible extended ERP system needs to include both a high-end and low-end solution as well as understand that a full interorganizational integration might not be realistic.

Originality/value

The paper puts forth business relationship portfolios as an important factor to consider when extending the ERP system functionality in the supply chain and toward customers.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Philippa Ashton

Seeks to explore the notion of fashion networks, both local and global, as a means by which “products” – economic and intangible – can be exchanged and to present research…

1239

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to explore the notion of fashion networks, both local and global, as a means by which “products” – economic and intangible – can be exchanged and to present research findings of a network study undertaken in the Nottingham knitting industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents a study of knitting companies in the Nottingham area of the UK using social network methods to identify the structure and role of the local and global networks in which these businesses sit and shows, by describing the networks of two contrasting companies, the advantages and challenges they afford to the learning of individual businesses and other participants in the local network.

Findings

The density of the local network is presented and the role of universities and regional development agencies is shown to be important. The profiles of two‐example companies shows one type which is well connected within the local network and another type which has good global links but is not well connected locally. The implications of these two kinds of profile are discussed.

Practical implications

Indicates the importance of developing balanced networks, which allow the dissemination of ideas, information and norms and provide opportunities for exchange.

Originality/value

Challenges current ideas about fashion supply chains by exploring markets as complex networks of relationships which reflects the blurring of boundaries between firms and changing perceptions of “customers” and currencies of exchange. This paper revisits notions of markets in the context of the needs of small and medium‐sized fashion businesses and in particular focuses on their learning and development.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Simone Guercini and Silvia Ranfagni

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the emergent role of market in cultural enterprises.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the emergent role of market in cultural enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors consider market as network and identify the role of the interaction process with a special focus on theatre organizations.

Findings

The interactions are examined on the basis of relationship models, distinguishing for each of them the progressive changes in their structural components (actors, activities and resources) and the outcomes (economic, artistic, social) produced.

Originality/value

The value of the study is to identify market representation by theatre organizations and to analyse their interactions with the market as a cumulative and continuous process.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

David Ballantyne

A retail banking case study published in this journal ten years ago described a method for inviting staff involvement in customer service improvement. In this article, the…

7554

Abstract

A retail banking case study published in this journal ten years ago described a method for inviting staff involvement in customer service improvement. In this article, the author has reinterpreted the case as an archetypal example of internal marketing for generating and circulating staff knowledge through a network of voluntary internal relationships. First, a typology for making sense of conflicting concepts in the internal marketing literature is provided. Second, the author returns to the case data to suggest an integrated theoretical framework for internal marketing that links the parallel but distinctive traditions of relationship marketing and the markets‐as‐networks approach of the International Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group. Third, internal marketing is defined as a relationship development strategy for the purpose of knowledge renewal. Finally, the implications for management are examined.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Frans Prenkert and Lars Hallén

The purpose of this article is to explore possible contributions to the development of models to define business networks conceptually, and identify and delineate them…

2101

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore possible contributions to the development of models to define business networks conceptually, and identify and delineate them empirically by integrating concepts and ideas from “market exchange theory” originating in the works of Alderson.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a conceptual discussion defining business networks as a type of exchange system, empirical data were used to exemplify and illustrate the theoretical development ideas. From data on 22 business firms collected in 1999‐2001 in the form of transcribed interviews and other print documentation, a business network as a type of exchange system was identified comprising five business entities. This case serves as illustration to the remainder of the theoretical discussions throughout the paper.

Findings

Based on a conceptualisation of business networks as a type of exchange system and a notion of interaction encompassing exchange processes stemming from both market exchange theory and social exchange theory, it is suggested that business networks can be more consistently identified and delineated empirically using this theoretical base.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical case is merely illustrative, and more extensive empirical work is needed to further test the ideas of business networks as a type of exchange system. The implications to the study of markets‐as‐networks are that these ideas can be used as a basis for identification, delineation and analysis of business networks.

Originality/value

This paper extends Alderson's work by suggesting a fourth type of transformation: transformation in ownership, as well as by developing a typology with five resource types in the exchange system. Furthermore, it provides a conceptual tool that can be used by researchers to identify, delineate and analyse business networks and incorporates market exchange theory.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Louise Canning

The purpose of this article is to provide an application of network literature that can be used for teaching and learning purposes.

5767

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide an application of network literature that can be used for teaching and learning purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

The information used to present the case study is drawn principally from documentary evidence as well as discussions with a phone manufacturer, retailer and waste management company.

Findings

Describes the role of key actors in the development of “circular” supply chains for mobile phones and outlines two recovery and reuse/recycling schemes, one which operated as a trial (having been initiated by mobile phone manufacturers) and one which has functioned as a commercially viable arrangement since 2002 and is led by waste management and retail firms. The two schemes demonstrate ways in which various parties seek to influence the behaviour of others as well as changes (both temporary and permanent) in the activities performed by and connections between parties.

Research limitations/implications

Whichever way various companies choose to deal with electronic waste, one factor remains constant, namely that collection schemes are of little value without consumer involvement. The case study would have benefited from empirical research of consumer awareness of and propensity to contribute to phone collection schemes.

Practical implications

A valuable illustration for teachers and students of “markets as networks” using a problem which is prevalent in any geographic location. The case could also be used as a vehicle for students to design and conduct research into consumer disposal of discarded phones and awareness of/propensity to make use of available recovery and reuse/recycling schemes.

Originality/value

Requires the reader to think beyond linear supply chains and shows how network literature can incorporate consumers and organisational actors alike. The UK perspective provides a useful teaching/learning tool by describing how discarded mobile phones are handled. In addition to this, the case study could be used as a starting point from which to investigate how networks are organised in other geographic locations for dealing with this same problem.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Peter Ekman

This paper aims to analyse how well enterprise systems capture the business network in which an industrial company is involved. Enterprise systems have been presented as a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse how well enterprise systems capture the business network in which an industrial company is involved. Enterprise systems have been presented as a “dream come true” with a seamless integration of business data through a common database and software modules that can be customized to the companies’ different functions. However, research shows that companies’ utilization of enterprise systems is limited, and that internal processes are prioritized.

Design/methodology/approach

European multinational companies and some of their partners have been followed through case studies between 2003 and 2010. The pattern-matching analysis has been supported by a theoretical framework that depicts industrial companies as engaged in business relationships in a network setting.

Findings

The results show that the company’s relationship-oriented activities are badly captured by the enterprise system. The study highlights limitations that future enterprise systems need to address if they are to be able to offer the company a better insight into its business network.

Originality/value

The traditionally internal focus on enterprise systems means that important business information transcending inter-organizational activities will be missed. To be worthy of the name enterprise system, more customer- and supplier-oriented activities need to be supported and captured.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

1 – 10 of 236