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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1989

Stanley F. Stasch and John L. Ward

Empirical research on successful and unsuccessful marketingstrategies indicates that smaller‐share firms in established marketshave difficulty gaining market share…

Abstract

Empirical research on successful and unsuccessful marketing strategies indicates that smaller‐share firms in established markets have difficulty gaining market share profitability. An empirically based framework of questions to guide the managers of such firms when evaluating an aggressive marketing strategy they have under consideration is presented. A literature review of the prescriptions for smaller‐share firms basically suggests the two strategies of differentiation and/or focus on faster growing segments. The authors research of 31 case histories offers several more strategic recommendations for the management of smaller‐share firms.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 7 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Eric H. Shaw

The purpose of this paper is to organize the semantics jungle of marketing strategy approaches, terms and concepts into a logically coherent framework using the history of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to organize the semantics jungle of marketing strategy approaches, terms and concepts into a logically coherent framework using the history of marketing thought to inform current marketing research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an intensive literature review tracing the three streams of marketing strategy terms and concepts from their roots in the literatures of early marketing management, managerial economics and corporate management to the present.

Findings

Along with marketing ideas, strategy concepts from managerial economics and from corporate management were absorbed directly into the corpus of strategic marketing thought. These three streams of research have converged into the current state of marketing strategy – an eclectic mixture of both complementary and conflicting strategic approaches, terms and concepts. By systematically following the evolutionary development of major contributions to strategic marketing thought and by redefining terms and refining concepts the various approaches to strategy can be integrated into a comprehensive conceptual framework for organizing and choosing among individual marketing strategies.

Originality/value

The framework offers conceptual and practical value. It provides a researcher with a consistent set of terms and concepts to build upon. The framework also provides a strategic toolkit for the marketing manager, based upon organizational and environmental conditions, to choose from among the feasible alternatives the most effective marketing strategy to achieve management's goal(s).

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Eric H. Shaw

The purpose of this paper is to describe the author’s serendipitous career and provide some lessons that might be of value to those pursuing the academic mission…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the author’s serendipitous career and provide some lessons that might be of value to those pursuing the academic mission: teaching, research and service.

Design/methodology/approach

The method involves primary sources; mainly the author’s CV to jog recall of events and dates, some of his articles and the teachings and writings of many others that influenced or inspired various aspects of the author’s career.

Findings

The author’s experiences affirm that to achieve any degree of success in the professoriate, in addition to having some talent it is also helpful to be lucky. There is a lot to navigate at a university. Opportunities exist at every turn, some noticed some missed. When recognized, be prepared. Being a professor is not what you do, it is who you are. Preparation for an academic career involves becoming a self-improvement project (essentially, a life-long student learning lessons). It requires developing expertise (preferably excellence) in some field of study, as well as resourcefulness, resilience and perseverance.

Originality/value

Each individual’s story is unique. The author’s path seems to have included more twists and turns than most. Consequently, he tried to highlight the experiences with lessons learned in most sections, some obvious some less so, which he expects (at least hopes) will prove valuable to future educators.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Lisa Harris and Geraldine Cohen

Examines whether business really is undergoing a revolution or just the latest in a series of incremental changes with the universal and seemingly exponential spread of…

Abstract

Examines whether business really is undergoing a revolution or just the latest in a series of incremental changes with the universal and seemingly exponential spread of Internet technology. While it is tempting to regard the Internet as a unique challenge through its dual role as a driver of change and provider of tools for change, the article begins by drawing on a number of historical precedents in order to question some of the “hype” surrounding current Internet developments. By analysing relevant literature and primary data from a number of case studies in the UK and the USA, the particular challenges facing marketing are then examined to establish whether there are any parallels in marketing history from which lessons for the future may be learned. From our examples it is concluded that many “new” developments have in fact been practised for centuries and traditional processes are an important constituent of “evolutionary” rather than “revolutionary” innovation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Maureen A. Bourassa, Peggy H. Cunningham and Jay M. Handelman

This study seeks to investigate the interaction between marketers' strategic behaviors, social norms, and societal stakeholders within a particular historical time period…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to investigate the interaction between marketers' strategic behaviors, social norms, and societal stakeholders within a particular historical time period, the 1960s and 1970s.

Design/methodology/approach

The study's findings are based on an analysis of two dominant retail industry trade publications, Chain Store Age and Progressive Grocer.

Findings

The analysis reveals an intriguing array of strategic marketing activity throughout these two decades not captured in considerations of marketing strategy at the time. The retailers examined engaged in two interesting behaviors. First, they responded to a wide range of stakeholder demands in a paradoxical fashion. Second, as retailers were confronted with social norms, instead of conforming to these norms they worked to help influence and shape them to their own advantage. This examination of retailers' behaviors over two decades has allowed the authors to present an intriguing new dimension to the understanding of marketing strategy.

Originality/value

The study found that throughout the 1960s and 1970s, marketers appeared to be actively engaged in a social dialogue. Through this dialogue, they not only responded to norms, but also attempted to shape the norms that came to define legitimate behavior for the marketers. This kind of strategic marketing endeavor was not accounted for in the managerial school of thought that dominated marketing thinking at the time.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Carlo Marco Belfanti

This paper aims to reconstruct the process that led to the appropriation of history – of a particular historical period, the Renaissance – as an intangible asset in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reconstruct the process that led to the appropriation of history – of a particular historical period, the Renaissance – as an intangible asset in the promotion of Italian fashion on the international market after the Second World War.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reconstructs the process that led to the appropriation of history – of a particular historical period, the Renaissance – as an intangible asset in the promotion of Italian fashion on the international market after the Second World War.

Findings

The successful debut of Italian fashion in the fifties can be explained through an intelligent marketing campaign which placed it directly in the centre of a well-known, appreciated, not to say indisputable, tradition of “good taste”: that of the Renaissance. Connecting Italian fashion with Renaissance Italy meant in fact introducing a kind of ante litteram guarantee of provenance – a “country branding” - recognized throughout the world, which, at the same time, evoked the splendour of a period in which Italian taste was a model to follow and imitate.

Originality/value

The studies on the history of the Italian fashion business have accepted the association of Italian fashion with Renaissance tradition as an element to be taken for granted, without inquiring into the historical legitimacy of such a coupling (either in the way in which it was produced or why it had such an important role). This paper dismantles the consistent rhetorical sedimentation with which the subject is encrusted and provides a new insight, showing that such continuity did not exist; on the contrary, it was the product of a marketing strategy.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Abel Duarte Alonso

The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify the most important resources, and emerging issues among Spain’s Cava wineries, including opportunities and challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify the most important resources, and emerging issues among Spain’s Cava wineries, including opportunities and challenges, from predominantly winery operators, and through the lens of the resource-based view of the firm (RBVF).

Design/methodology/approach

Unstructured, face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted with the representatives of five Cava firms, and with the manager of the local Institute of Cava in Sant Sadurnà d’Anoia, Spain. In addition, owners/managers of seven other Cava wineries provided responses and comments via email.

Findings

The attributes pertaining to the RBVF, such as valuable, rare, imperfect imitable resources, and (non)substitutability emerged in the present study, illustrated by the local designation of origin, tradition/history, territory, specific grape varietals and increased perceived quality of Cava products. To address pressing challenges and maximise opportunities, particularly the decline of domestic Cava consumption, participants underline strategies to gain more exposure in international wine consumer markets, and also benefit from the growing popularity of gastronomy and wine tourism.

Originality/value

Originality and value in this research are demonstrated in two ways. First, the study focuses on a region, which, despite its long history and tradition, has received limited attention from the academic literature, especially in recent years. Second, the study adopts the RBVF to facilitate understanding of contemporary issues affecting Cava wineries, and in aligning theory and findings. To date, this theoretical framework has been marginally adopted to examine the wine industry; this limitation is even more evident within the Cava industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

James W. Martin

This paper aims to examine the tourist business and marketing strategies of a US agribusiness giant, the United Fruit Company (UFCO), between its incorporation in 1899 and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the tourist business and marketing strategies of a US agribusiness giant, the United Fruit Company (UFCO), between its incorporation in 1899 and 1940. It considers how tourist marketing served the company’s public-relations interest and tourism’s broader connection to narratives of US ascendancy in the Caribbean Basin.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on original research in a series of published company materials, including annual reports and a wide variety of marketing materials, as well as a variety of rare primary sources documenting the experiences of US tourists on UFCO cruises.

Findings

From its incorporation in 1899, the UFCO developed a Caribbean cruise business as a vital part of its strategies of vertical integration and expansion around the region. Marketing tropical travel at a time when tropical disease dominated US perceptions of such places required a thorough conceptual makeover, and UFCO publicity played an important part in this process. The company advertised Caribbean destinations first for their therapeutic possibilities, but by the 1920s, a framework of anachronistic space and picturesque primitivism predominated in marketing campaigns. The structure of this narrative naturalized the company’s, and more broadly, US, hegemony in the region. While on cruises, tourists became witnesses to and participants in a series of spectacles and activities highlighting the company’s technological prowess and benevolence.

Originality/value

This analysis centers on a largely overlooked dimension of the famed banana company’s enterprise. It is grounded in a wide collection of primary sources largely untapped by researchers, a source base that brings tourist perception and experience into the story of this company’s marketing efforts. This research brings tourism and leisure into the historical discussion of US power in early-twentieth-century Latin America.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2015

Alberto Guenzi

This paper aims to approach the issue of premium offers in Italy by discussing the case study of Fabbri, a firm operating since 1905 in the business of liqueurs, syrups…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to approach the issue of premium offers in Italy by discussing the case study of Fabbri, a firm operating since 1905 in the business of liqueurs, syrups and semi-manufactured products for ice cream.

Design/methodology/approach

The research takes into analysis three marketing schemes, all related to direct premium promotions, adopted by Fabbri at various times during the twentieth century. The evolution of the company’s marketing strategy is outlined drawing on several types of sources: archive documents, posters and labels and audiovisual material. It is analysed in the socio-economic and legal context of twentieth century Italy, and in comparison with premium offers in the USA and Europe.

Findings

The study argues that direct premium may represent a long-lasting and efficient marketing strategy when a firm is able to adapt it to a context that changes over time. Fabbri not only used premium offers to launch its products but also to consolidate its brand image.

Research limitations/implications

By showing that innovative promotions are not necessarily connected to large firms, Fabbri’s case suggests that further research should be carried out to outline marketing policies carried out by small to medium enterprises.

Originality/value

Much has been written on premium offers in the USA and in Europe, but very little on such types of promotions in Italy, especially with reference to direct premiums. This study fills this gap and documents that a small family-owned firm was able to carry out innovative marketing policies as far as in the 1920s.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Lisa C. Thomas, Sandra Painbéni and Harry Barton

The aim of this paper is to develop an understanding of the value and application of entrepreneurial marketing within the French wine industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to develop an understanding of the value and application of entrepreneurial marketing within the French wine industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an initial review of the literature describing the nature of entrepreneurial marketing and its potential application within the wine industry, a case study is presented of a small independent winery of the Côtes du Rhône in order to explore the theory and practice of entrepreneurial marketing in this commercially important French wine growing region.

Findings

The marketing approach adopted by the case company is found to contrast with the traditional adversarial approach to competition prevalent throughout the French wine industry. The case study illustrates how entrepreneurial marketing has allowed the leverage of superior knowledge of customer preferences, market intelligence and product knowledge in the process of delivering superior value to the customer through brand differentiation at firm level. Additionally, engaging in cooperative relationship development at regional and international level appears significant in creating opportunities for knowledge acquisition and innovation.

Originality/value

The research provides interesting insights into the potential value of the adoption of entrepreneurial marketing by small wineries in France.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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