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Article

Debbie Thorne LeClair

While global economic conditions create incentives for new market entry and expansion strategies, the environmental factors affecting these strategies must be fully…

Abstract

While global economic conditions create incentives for new market entry and expansion strategies, the environmental factors affecting these strategies must be fully considered. For example, the international marketer will encounter unfamiliar laws and policies that can create confusion about standards and require changes in marketing philosophy and practice. This article utilizes a general marketing planning framework to examine the effects of government policy on marketing activities. Using the European Union as an example, the discussion includes an overview of policy inputs to international marketing decisions, specific legislation related to marketing strategy, and impending issues that may affect marketing decision making in the future. The article incorporates a proactive orientation toward the marketing policy environment through a review of both current laws and other topics with a legal and political component. The information presented is useful to international marketing managers and educators for understanding the effects of government policy on the international marketing planning process.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Tom Suraphol Apaiwongse

Explores the efficacy of market‐driven (voluntary) approaches toecological strategies. Examines ecological marketing behavior from amultiperson level of analysis. Focusses…

Abstract

Explores the efficacy of market‐driven (voluntary) approaches to ecological strategies. Examines ecological marketing behavior from a multiperson level of analysis. Focusses on members of the industrial DMC (dual‐marketing‐center) who participate in the buying‐selling process of the EPA policies with Government officials and investigates the DMC′s adaptive climatic configuration in response to varying levels of policy uncertainty. The findings from a national sample suggest that perceptions of policy uncertainty are related to DMC climate dimensions: cohesiveness, coordination and trust.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Carlos Oliveira Santos

Since 2004, the British Government has delivered a national policy on social marketing that has created a new frame of reference in this field. This paper aims to study…

Abstract

Purpose

Since 2004, the British Government has delivered a national policy on social marketing that has created a new frame of reference in this field. This paper aims to study the genesis, evolution and implementation of the policy process that led to an important development in British public health.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth multifaceted single case study, mixing qualitative and quantitative data including participatory research, enabled by a cognitive approach based on elements of knowledge, ideas, representations and social beliefs in the elaboration of a public policy.

Findings

This approach to understanding the British policy on social marketing process demonstrates a useful explanatory capacity, producing a comprehensive articulation of the main cognitive, normative, and instrumental dimensions of this policy, including its significant mutations influenced by the 2008 Great Recession and subsequent political evolution.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has followed the British social marketing policy’s implementation in England. In Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, this national policy had specific developments that it was not followed in our study In general, subject to complex historical, social and political conditions, this is a field that preserves its dynamism and the ability to question concepts and processes. Ever seeking new directions and solutions, it requires an ongoing research study.

Practical implications

Conclusions speak in favour of a prescriptive framework for a national policy on social marketing that can inform other government entities’ efforts to develop similar policies in other countries. A correct understanding of such a political process can lead to better management of its development and its consequent contribution to improving social marketing policy and interventions.

Social implications

A proper conception and management of a social marketing policy can contribute to improving the well-being of citizens.

Originality/value

It is the first time that this specific cognitive approach has been applied so systematically to a national social marketing policy through a long-term research, providing a prescriptive framework for other’ efforts to develop similar policies.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article

Michael P. Mokwa

Marketing is innovative thinking and inventive doing for many organizations. Most noncommercial organizations and small businesses are exploring formal marketing concepts…

Abstract

Marketing is innovative thinking and inventive doing for many organizations. Most noncommercial organizations and small businesses are exploring formal marketing concepts and methods for the first time. Industrial and high technology companies are becoming more sensitive to their customers and competitors and, therefore, to marketing efforts. Environmental uncertainty and pressures have challenged conventional practices in traditionally marketing‐oriented industries such as retailing and packaged goods.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

Georgina Cairns, Marisa De Andrade and Jane Landon

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility and utility of developing an independently defined and accredited benchmark standard for responsible food marketing

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the feasibility and utility of developing an independently defined and accredited benchmark standard for responsible food marketing. To identify provisional evidence and insights on factors likely to be critical to its successful development and its capacity to strengthen the effectiveness of responsible food marketing policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Desk-based cross-policy domain case study.

Findings

There is promising evidence that the development and deployment of an evidence-based, independently defined and verified responsible food marketing standard is feasible. Provisional findings on factors critical to the development of an effective standard and strategically significant evidence gaps are presented as insights in support of future food marketing policy and research planning.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation of these preliminary findings is required.

Practical implications

The study has provisionally identified an innovative intervention with the potential to strengthen statutory, voluntary and internationally coordinated food marketing control policy approaches.

Originality/value

This is the first report of research into the potential for an independent benchmark standard to advance and strengthen responsible food marketing policy goals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

Paul A. Pautler

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the…

Abstract

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and ideology of the FTC’s leaders, developments in the field of economics, and the tenor of the times. The over-riding current role is to provide well considered, unbiased economic advice regarding antitrust and consumer protection law enforcement cases to the legal staff and the Commission. The second role, which long ago was primary, is to provide reports on investigations of various industries to the public and public officials. This role was more recently called research or “policy R&D”. A third role is to advocate for competition and markets both domestically and internationally. As a practical matter, the provision of economic advice to the FTC and to the legal staff has required that the economists wear “two hats,” helping the legal staff investigate cases and provide evidence to support law enforcement cases while also providing advice to the legal bureaus and to the Commission on which cases to pursue (thus providing “a second set of eyes” to evaluate cases). There is sometimes a tension in those functions because building a case is not the same as evaluating a case. Economists and the Bureau of Economics have provided such services to the FTC for over 100 years proving that a sub-organization can survive while playing roles that sometimes conflict. Such a life is not, however, always easy or fun.

Details

Healthcare Antitrust, Settlements, and the Federal Trade Commission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-599-9

Keywords

Content available
Article

François J. Dessart and René van Bavel

This commentary argues that social marketing and the application of behavioural sciences to policy constitute two converging paths towards better policies. It highlights…

Abstract

Purpose

This commentary argues that social marketing and the application of behavioural sciences to policy constitute two converging paths towards better policies. It highlights points of convergence and divergence between both disciplines and the potential benefits of further embedding social marketing principles and methods within the recent trend of applying behavioural sciences to policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The commentary relies on a review of the behavioural sciences and social marketing literatures and on an analysis of institutional reports reviewing cases of behaviourally informed policies.

Findings

Behavioural sciences are increasingly informing policies to promote societal well-being. Social marketing has seldom been explicitly considered as being part of this phenomenon, although it is de facto. Both disciplines share similar end-goals, inform similar policy applications and are rooted in behavioural analysis. They diverge in their theoretical frameworks, their relative emphasis on behaviour change and the span of interventions they generate. Several benefits of embedding social marketing principles and methods within the current way of applying behavioural sciences to policy are identified.

Practical implications

Scholars applying behavioural sciences to policy are encouraged, when appropriate, to use the insights and methods from social marketing. Social marketing can engage in a dialogue with behavioural sciences to explore how to pilot the convergence of both approaches in practice.

Originality/value

The novelty of this contribution lies in providing the first comparison of the application of behavioural sciences to policy with social marketing, and in using the policy-making cycle framework to map the contributions and complementarities of both disciplines.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article

Hans Buurma

Customer‐oriented governments may use marketing tools to match their policy “products” with citizens’ requirements. However, these tools are not based on exchanges since…

Abstract

Customer‐oriented governments may use marketing tools to match their policy “products” with citizens’ requirements. However, these tools are not based on exchanges since governments, apart from cost recovery, do not demand any reciprocation for their products. The concept of public policy marketing could enable governments to “sell” their policies to citizens, based on non‐commercial marketing exchanges specific to the context of public administration. Then, social behaviour should be considered citizens’ reciprocation contributing to social effects the government has aimed for. Thus public policy marketing, though not yet tested in practise, can be expected to improve the implementation of those governmental policies in which citizen conduct is critical to success.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Ross Gordon

Social marketing scholars have posited that influencing policy makers, regulators, managers and educators can help address societal problems “upstream”. Applying “upstream…

Abstract

Purpose

Social marketing scholars have posited that influencing policy makers, regulators, managers and educators can help address societal problems “upstream”. Applying “upstream social marketing”, these groups can be treated as target audiences, and through use of marketing techniques, advocacy, stakeholder engagement, and informing evidence based policy making, their behaviour can be influenced to engender pro-social outcomes, for example through policy change. However, examples and guidance on how upstream social marketing can be effectively employed to successfully alter the structural environment is lacking. This article aims to unlock the potential of upstream social marketing by examining how it can be systematically employed.

Design/methodology/approach

The article examines the development of the upstream social marketing concept in the extant literature, and presents some guiding principles, before analysing the case study of minimum unit pricing of alcohol in Scotland. The failure to comprehensively employ upstream social marketing in this case is compared with the successful use of upstream social marketing in tobacco control.

Findings

The article suggests that heretofore, upstream social marketing has not always been systematically applied using social marketing principles. Guidance on upstream social marketing is presented, and thoughts on the trajectory of the concept for the future are offered.

Originality/value

The paper identifies guidelines for unlocking the potential of upstream social marketing, and suggests areas in which future research and writings are required to help develop the concept.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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