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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Barbara J. Philips

Imagination is a complex mental process where consciousness departs from reality to create new content not currently found in existence. Imagination is key to marketing

1737

Abstract

Purpose

Imagination is a complex mental process where consciousness departs from reality to create new content not currently found in existence. Imagination is key to marketing persuasion, but studies that examine consumer imagination in response to marketing messages illustrate confusing and sometimes contradictory perspectives about consumers’ mental processing. This paper aims to provide a review of the existing literature on consumer imagination relevant to marketing scholarship, and builds a new theoretical framework to organize and explain these papers.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the marketing literature was undertaken to identify all papers related to consumer imagination and its role in marketing persuasion. A focus was placed on empirical papers, review papers and meta-analyses.

Findings

A new conceptual framework was created to classify the consumer imagination literature based on both the characteristics and the content of imagination. The existing marketing literature was then organized into the framework. The framework helps to explain seeming contradictions between different studies as well as helps to collect similar studies together to summarize schools of thought.

Originality/value

The imagination framework presents an entirely new way of conceptualizing imagination research in marketing. This new categorization structure not only clarifies consumers’ use of imagination in response to marketing messages but also identifies questions for future research in this area of marketing theory.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Stephen Brown

According to John Grant’s New Marketing Manifesto, contemporary consumers “act their shoe size not their age” by resolutely refusing to grow up. They are not alone…

4012

Abstract

According to John Grant’s New Marketing Manifesto, contemporary consumers “act their shoe size not their age” by resolutely refusing to grow up. They are not alone. Managers too are adopting a kiddy imperative, as the profusion of primers predicated on children’s literature – and storytelling generally – bears witness. Winnie the Pooh, the Wizard of Oz, Alice in Wonderland and Hans Christian Andersen are the marketing gurus du jour, or so it seems. This paper adds to the juvenile agenda by examining the Harry Potter books, all four of which are replete with references to market‐place phenomena, and contending that scholarly sustenance can be drawn from J.K. Rowling’s remarkable, if ambivalent, marketing imagination.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Shu‐pei Tsai

The archetype paradigm has been gaining importance as a marketing approach to global branding, advocating that strategists should create archetypal symbolism to engage…

7547

Abstract

Purpose

The archetype paradigm has been gaining importance as a marketing approach to global branding, advocating that strategists should create archetypal symbolism to engage with fundamental human psychology. The study reported here is based on consumer imagination theory, which aims to offers a means to determine whether a brand archetype will transform into an icon, and thereby achieve the maximum effect.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews with 810 loyal customers of the Nike Air Jordan brand took place in the Asia Pacific, Western Europe, and North America regions of the world. Sub‐samples were selected and interviewed by research assistants in each sampling location, under central control to ensure that all profiles matched the known characteristics of the population under study. A relatively unstructured first phase generated question topics, which were transformed into verbatim sentences on cards, which respondents subsequently sorted. Matrix analysis elicited relationships among the resultant constructs, in terms of degree and direction. Focus group discussions were conducted to refine the emerging findings. Data were subjected to “open”, “axial”, and “selective” coding. Key concepts and relationships were finally incorporated into a fully developed model.

Findings

A “brand archetype‐icon transformation” model derived from the analysed data suggests a plan for the implementation of the “archetypal marketing” strategy, combining four theoretical elements under the overall coordination of a “comprehensive brand management” philosophy.

Originality/value

This study is an original and exploratory transfer of theoretical principles from classic psychology to marketing strategy. The final section examines practical potential by reference to other global brands. The paper proposes a paradigm for building and sustaining consumer loyalty to global brands.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Stephen Brown

Thirty years ago, Philip Kotler drafted the modern marketing constitution and most would agree that it has served the discipline well. A generation on from Kotler’s…

5172

Abstract

Thirty years ago, Philip Kotler drafted the modern marketing constitution and most would agree that it has served the discipline well. A generation on from Kotler’s conceptual charter, however, our rainbow coalition is in a state of disarray. Marketing is doubted by its scholarly citizens, questioned by a standing army of consultants and challenged by increasingly anarchistic consumers who are voting with their pocketbooks. This paper employs Kotler’s political metaphor to posit that conceptual amendments are necessary and that the democratic principles of consumer sovereignty might not be the most appropriate constitutional framework for our postmodern marketing times. A dictatorship of the imagination is advocated. An ingenuity‐led insurrection is recommended. A confederacy of creativity is called for. And a retrospective secession is suggested.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Stephen Brown

Felicitous writing is enormously important. However, the art of writing well is rarely addressed by marketing scholars. This paper seeks to argue that the marketing

Abstract

Purpose

Felicitous writing is enormously important. However, the art of writing well is rarely addressed by marketing scholars. This paper seeks to argue that the marketing academy has much to learn from historiography, a sub‐discipline devoted to the explication of historical writing.

Design/methodology/approach

Although it is primarily predicated on published works, this paper is not a conventional literature review. It relies, rather, on the classic historical method of “compare and contrast”. It considers parallels between the paired disciplines yet notes where marketing and history diverge in relation to literary styles and scientific aspirations.

Findings

It is concluded that marketing writing could benefit from greater emphasis on “character” and “storytelling”. These might help humanise a mode of academic communication that is becoming increasingly abstruse and ever‐more unappealing to its readership.

Research implications

If its argument is accepted by the academic community – and, more importantly, acted upon – this paper should transform the writing of marketing. Although the academic reward systems and power structures of marketing make revolutionary change unlikely, a “scholarly spring” is not inconceivable.

Originality/value

The paper's originality rests in the observation that originality is unnecessary. All of the literary‐cum‐stylistic issues raised in this paper have already been tackled by professional historians. Whether marketers are willing to learn from their historical brethren remains to be seen.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Donald R. Melville

The point of marketing prescience is to predict what customers may want in the future so that you can tailor your products or services to their future needs. The key to…

Abstract

The point of marketing prescience is to predict what customers may want in the future so that you can tailor your products or services to their future needs. The key to marketing prescience is to have an open mind, using any and all experience, working from analogy, and accepting ideas from any source, or from any person, no matter how bizarre the idea may appear at first blush. Conversely, the major inhibition to marketing prescience is the closed mind, the mind that says, “We have tried that before” or “It cannot work” or “It's a stupid idea.”

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Book part
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Bilgehan Bozkurt

Abstract

Details

Debates in Marketing Orientation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-836-9

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Barry Nathan Rosen, Jean J. Boddewyn and Ernst A. Louis

The topic of internationally standardised branding has been widelydebated in the marketing literature. However, no studies haveempirically examined the actual extent of…

1074

Abstract

The topic of internationally standardised branding has been widely debated in the marketing literature. However, no studies have empirically examined the actual extent of international brand penetration and standardisation. Based on a survey of US brand managers of consumer products, this study found that while some 66 per cent of the responding brands are used abroad and most are internationally standardised, approximately 80 per cent of sales still come from the US market. Overseas, US brands generate most of their sales in culturally similar markets, specifically Canada and the United Kingdom.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Mohammed Boussouara and David Deakins

Discusses case study and interview evidence to examine the evolution and development of entrepreneurial strategies in the high technology small firm (HTSF). Evidence from…

2966

Abstract

Discusses case study and interview evidence to examine the evolution and development of entrepreneurial strategies in the high technology small firm (HTSF). Evidence from case study material suggests that a period of non high technology development can be an advantage for the entrepreneur to gain essential contacts, networks and learn to develop strategy, as well as time to acquire income and funding to permit the development of the technology‐based firm. The paper discusses evidence from four rich case studies. Each of these involved a non‐high tech start‐up, yet this was still crucial to the entrepreneurship process and learning of the entrepreneur. Material from case evidence is also combined with interview evidence to discuss the critical factors in the learning process and the development of entrepreneurial strategies from a programme of interviews with HTSFs. It is argued that the evolution of a marketing strategy is part of the learning process involved in entrepreneurial development, we need to understand the diversity of this process if intervention is to be better informed by practitioners and by policy makers. In this paper we stress the diversity of entrepreneurial development, within HTSFs, discuss the importance of learning in entrepreneurial development for developing marketing strategies and develop policy implications for intervention.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Geoff Simmons

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, to provide an overview of postmodern marketing in the consumer context, integrating the relevant literature around two…

16101

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, to provide an overview of postmodern marketing in the consumer context, integrating the relevant literature around two contrary arguments. Second, it seeks to reveal the potential of the internet as a marketing tool that can address the complexities inherent in postmodern consumer markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a general review.

Findings

This paper reveals that complexity reigns supreme in the postmodern marketing consumer context, with postmodern consumers seeking both individualistic and communal brand experiences. Within this complexity, the paper identifies the internet as an enabling tool, which allows direct, real‐time individualised interaction with postmodern consumers. Further, the internet's ability to provide these consumers with the opportunity to express this individuality within homogeneous groups is also presented.

Practical implications

This paper reveals how the internet can allow an individualised one‐to‐one connection with postmodern consumers to a level unparalleled offline. Correspondingly, the paper also reveals how the internet is precipitating significant new opportunities for marketers to engage in and create enticing experiences for postmodern consumers, who crave the ability to appropriate consumption and brands as a means of individualised self‐expression within homogeneous groups.

Originality/value

This paper provides a contemporary and original overview of the opportunities proffered to marketers by the internet, in dealing with the inherent complexities erupting from within consumer markets in the postmodern era.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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