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Article

Heng Xu

This paper aims to investigate the national brand manufacturer's ability from corporate social responsibility (CSR) innovation as a counterstrategy against the private…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the national brand manufacturer's ability from corporate social responsibility (CSR) innovation as a counterstrategy against the private label by a retailer. By constructing a model of manufacturer–retailer interaction, the paper attempts to analyze that the national brand manufacturer’s decision on the CSR innovation and the effect of such innovation on the retailer’s motivation of launching the private label. The results of the theoretical model in this paper could be applied by the actors in supply chains in making decision on CSR innovation and the launch of a new brand.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical model in the paper describes a manufacturer–retailer interaction with the presence of the private label and CSR innovation on the national brand. Specifically, the manufacturer has option of innovating its products and makes them to be more socially responsible; in the meanwhile, the retailer has option of launching its private label. Moreover, there are heterogeneous consumers with respect to their preferences on the CSR feature. The altruistic consumers prefer the socially responsible product while the normal consumers are indifferent between the socially responsible and basic products. By predicting the expected profit, the two firms make decision over the supply chain.

Findings

The authors find that the CSR innovation can indeed restrict the retailer’s incentive to launch the private label. Because of the presence of the altruistic consumers, the CSR innovation can help the national brand product to expand its market relative to the situation without the innovation. They demonstrate that the national brand manufacturer wishes to invest more in CSR innovation under non-linear pricing contract and the retailer is more likely to launch the private label. This is because that the non-linear pricing contract makes the two firms to concern more about their joint profit, causing the competition is less fierce.

Originality/value

This paper explains that the CSR innovation in the national brand product can be an effective counterstrategy by the manufacturer to deter the launch of the private label, which has not been considered by the existing studies about national brand-private label competition. Moreover, this paper also shows that the CSR innovation may benefit both the national brand manufacturer and the retailer under some conditions. In addition, the results of the paper provide some insights to the national brand manufacturer when making decision on the CSR innovation and to the retailer when reacting the manufacturer’s CSR innovation.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article

James R. Webb

The innovative process of new product development remains unique within most organizations. This uniqueness stems from the requirements of the new product development…

Abstract

Purpose

The innovative process of new product development remains unique within most organizations. This uniqueness stems from the requirements of the new product development manager to grapple with both the universe of emerging technologies from which a new feature or improvement must be found and to simultaneously maintain a constant awareness of the requirements of an ever-changing customer base. Amongst all of this uncertainty, there is still a time when new product development managers choose to ignore the warning signals that a project is failing and continue to commit resources. This paper refers to this as irrational commitment. This paper aims to examine the uncertainty of new product development and the reasons for this irrational commitment to failed projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used a structured systematic review of literature to identify the most common types of irrational commitment in new product development and their impact on the corporation.

Findings

The paper provides insights into the causes and effects of management irrationally committing to new product development projects that are doomed to failure. It suggests that the three major areas of knowledge that need to be better integrated into the decision-making process are technology trends, marketing knowledge and the capabilities of the company itself.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach of using a systematic review of literature, primary research needs to be conducted in the future to validate and refine the findings of the paper.

Practical implications

The paper provides leadership with guidelines to avoid irrationally committing to failed new product development efforts.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the literature on innovation systems.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Book part

Fred Block and Matthew R. Keller

In this chapter, we argue for an essential dualism in the U.S. economy; there are simultaneously institutional sources of dynamism and institutional patterns that portend…

Abstract

In this chapter, we argue for an essential dualism in the U.S. economy; there are simultaneously institutional sources of dynamism and institutional patterns that portend a process of decay and decline. This dualism corresponds to a growing divide between innovative small- and medium-sized enterprises and big corporations – both financial and nonfinancial – that are increasingly predatory in their business strategies. Surprisingly, firms on both sides of the divide are increasingly dependent on government. The small- and medium-sized firms rely heavily on government science and technology programs to help them innovate. The large firms need government to protect their position. Whether dynamism or decay will prove to be stronger, we think, is contingent on political choices that will be made over the next ten years. This contingency, in turn, makes it easier to understand the highly polarized nature of partisan politics in the United States today.

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Article

Stephen Denning

The author observes that as customer-focused innovation takes hold in more and more industries, the result is a business environment that is coming to be known as “the…

Abstract

Purpose

The author observes that as customer-focused innovation takes hold in more and more industries, the result is a business environment that is coming to be known as “the Creative Economy,” an operating arena with unique “physics” that successful practitioners are beginning to be able to describe.

Design/methodology/approach

The author interprets the insights of both a successful serial entrepreneur and cutting-edge academics to shed fresh light on how to distinguish between real and false opportunities and threats in the new operating environment of the Creative Economy.

Findings

The author examines serial entrepreneur Peter Thiel’s seven – sometimes surprising – tools for implementing market-making innovation in the Creative Economy. They are, “the seven questions that every market-creating business must answer.”

Practical implications

A key insight of the article is that “All truly successful market-creating firms are de facto monopolies.”

Originality/value

For both practitioners and academics, the article provides a guide to assessing market-making innovations and connects the experience of successful entrepreneurs with new conceptual models by thought leaders like John P. Kotter and Clayton Christensen.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article

Stephen Denning

Among the most important challenges for leaders is how metrics and analytic tools will help or hinder the transition to the Creative Economy. This paper aims to address…

Abstract

Purpose

Among the most important challenges for leaders is how metrics and analytic tools will help or hinder the transition to the Creative Economy. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Many authors argue that commonly used financial metrics cause corporations to forgo crucial invests in market making innovation. Such indictments of the current system of metrics raise an overarching question: Does success in the Creative Economy require new analytic tools, or rather the application of different management mindsets?

Findings

The author believes the evidence indicates that success in the Creative Economy depends on a combination of different management mindsets and an improved deployment of existing tools.

Practical implications

In the emerging Creative Economy, making money and corporate survival depend not merely on pushing products at customers but rather on delighting them with continuous innovation so that they want to keep on buying. Financial metrics must not be allowed to subvert this goal.

Originality/value

The article suggests how a number of metrics and tools, if employed in the proper context, could promote a corporation’s success in the coming Creative Economy, a valuable lesson for leaders who must in turn educate shareholders and other stakeholders.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article

Sergio Torres Valdivieso

Managerial decision making regarding using organizational forms methodology to develop technological innovations in the context of technological strategy has not been the…

Abstract

Managerial decision making regarding using organizational forms methodology to develop technological innovations in the context of technological strategy has not been the subject of a prolific number of studies; nevertheless, it has proven to be an important matter. This is particularly notable in the Iberoamerican context, where a theoretical framework has not been developed yet. It is within such a context that this empirical research intends to determine the organizational forms used by companies of the machine‐tool sector of the Basque Country in their implementation of processes of technological innovation. This research is supported by the theoretical framework provided by transaction cost economics, evolutionary economics, and competitive strategy theories. It also uses the contrasting approach as a starting point for proposing some extensive ideas on this issue.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

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Article

Stephen Denning

While some large organizations are preoccupied with mastering operational Agility as a way to upgrade existing products and services, they and the wider management…

Abstract

Purpose

While some large organizations are preoccupied with mastering operational Agility as a way to upgrade existing products and services, they and the wider management community need to realize that the main financial benefits from Agile management will flow from the next frontier: achieving Strategic Agility, a market-making approach to innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The author proposes that firms adopt Agile management as a way to promote market-creating innovations through a process of imagining and delivering something that unexpectedly delights whole new groups of customers, once they realize the possibilities.

Findings

The potential of the Agile approach to innovation is that it can revitalize mature companies by discovering new customer experiences and create products and services that fulfill unmet needs.

Practical implications

This article shows how Agile management and strategic management concepts like “Jobs to be done” theory and “Blue Ocean” strategy can merge to promote market-creating innovation.

Originality/value

Given that industry borders are dissolving and competition is more dynamic than ever, the need for Strategic Agility – speedy, customer focused innovation that aims to make markets–is becoming increasingly obvious. This confluence of Agile and strategic management is a new and exciting approach to innovation.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article

Cajetan Ikechukwu Mbama, Patrick Ezepue, Lyuba Alboul and Martin Beer

This study aims to examine managers’ perceptions of digital banking’s (DB) effect on customer experience and banks’ financial performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine managers’ perceptions of digital banking’s (DB) effect on customer experience and banks’ financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses interviews from the senior UK bank managers to gather their views on DB’s impact on customer experience and financial performance. The interviews were thematically analysed to produce results and a model.

Findings

The attributes affecting DB experience are as follows: service quality, functional quality, perceived value, service customisation, service speed, employee–customer engagement, brand trust, DB innovation, perceived usability and perceived risk. They affect customer experience, satisfaction and loyalty and financial performance. The research revealed relationships amongst these attributes (e.g. brand trust and loyalty).

Research limitations/implications

The study is a UK bank specific and can be replicated in other developed countries’ banks, helping in further comparison. However, DB is conducted globally, which implies that the findings are robust enough to be potentially applied in other countries. The proposed model shows customer experience drivers and outcomes through managers’ views, which can be theoretically tested.

Practical implications

The findings suggest important attributes (as above) for consideration to improve DB customer experience and financial performance. They show the relevance of employee–customer interaction, service personalisation, value proposition, quality service offering and DB experience, which have useful implications for improving DB design and interactive marketing.

Originality/value

Gauging DB customer experience as perceived by bank managers has not been studied in this way, highlighting DB effectiveness, which is important for multi-channel marketing and banks’ financial performance, and advances theory.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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Article

José Fernández-Menéndez, Óscar Rodríguez-Ruiz, José-Ignacio López-Sánchez and María Isabel Delgado-Piña

The purpose of this paper is to study how job reductions affect product innovation and marketing innovation in a sample of 2,034 Spanish manufacturing firms in the period…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how job reductions affect product innovation and marketing innovation in a sample of 2,034 Spanish manufacturing firms in the period 2007–2014.

Design/methodology/approach

Poisson and logistic regression models with random effects were used to analyse the impact of downsizing on some innovation outcomes of firms.

Findings

The results of this research show that the stressful measure of job reductions may have unexpected consequences, stimulating innovation. However downsizing combined with radical organisational changes such as new equipment, techniques or processes seems to have a negative impact on product and marketing innovation.

Originality/value

This research has two original features. First, it explores the unconventional direction of causality from the planned elimination of jobs to innovation outputs. Secondly, the paper looks at the combined effect of downsizing and other restructuring measures on different types of innovation. Following the threat-rigidity theory, we assume that this combination represents a major threat for survivors that leads to lower levels of product and marketing innovation.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article

David Doloreux and Ekaterina Turkina

This paper aims to explore the effects of multiple external sources of knowledge and of the use of winemaker consultants on innovation in the Canadian wine industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effects of multiple external sources of knowledge and of the use of winemaker consultants on innovation in the Canadian wine industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study are taken from an original survey of wine firms in Canada covering the 2007-2009 period. The survey was carried out by computer-assisted telephone interviews, and it was addressed to winery firms that are engaged in growing grapes and producing wine.

Findings

The results show that the use of winemaker consultants positively affects all forms of innovation. At the same, as far as external knowledge sources are concerned, marketing sources positively affect all types of innovation, while research sources and general sources have a positive influence on particular forms of innovation. The results also show that winemaker consultants interact with other knowledge sources. Nevertheless, there are important nuances with regard to which type of knowledge sources is more compatible with the use of winemaker consultants for which type of innovation.

Originality/value

To date, there is no empirical evidence of the extent to which the use of external winemaker consultants and external knowledge sources interact together and what are their impacts on the introduction of different forms of innovation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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