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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

David Bennett, Paul Forrester and John Hassard

Links the concept of marketdriven business strategies with thedesign of production systems. It draws upon the case of a firm which,during the last decade, changed its…

Abstract

Links the concept of marketdriven business strategies with the design of production systems. It draws upon the case of a firm which, during the last decade, changed its strategy from being “technology led” to “market driven”. The research, based on interdisciplinary fieldwork involving long‐term participant observation, investigated the factors which contribute to the successful design and implementation of flexible production systems in electronics assembly. These investigations were conducted in collaboration with a major computer manufacturer, with other electronics firms being studied for comparison. The research identified a number of strategies and actions seen as crucial to the development of efficient flexible production systems, namely: effective integration of subsystems, development of appropriate controls and performance measures, compatibility between production system design and organization structure, and the development of a climate conducive to organizational change. Overall, the analysis suggests that in the electronics industry there exists an extremely high degree of environmental complexity and turbulence. This serves to shape the strategic, technical and social structures that are developed to match this complexity, examples of which are niche marketing, flexible manufacturing and employee harmonization.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Paul Prabhaker

Asserts that there are two forces at work in the business environment that are requiring organizations to rethink their business models: the power of customers and changes…

Abstract

Asserts that there are two forces at work in the business environment that are requiring organizations to rethink their business models: the power of customers and changes in technology. Suggests that companies are moving away from customer‐relationship‐management to customer‐managed relationships. Discusses how successful manufacturing businesses adapt to “high pressure” markets. These organizations leverage advanced manufacturing technologies, such as flexible tooling, computer‐aided design and computer‐integrated manufacturing control systems, to significantly improve their strategic marketing capabilities.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

H. Igor Ansoff

The high‐tech companies that will succeed in this environment will fundamentally revise their strategies from the historical technology‐driven product proliferation to…

Abstract

The high‐tech companies that will succeed in this environment will fundamentally revise their strategies from the historical technology‐driven product proliferation to strategies that control the rate of technological advances, segment markets according to distinctive customer needs, and design products to respond to those needs.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2015

Yang Cheng, John Johansen and Haibo Hu

The purpose of this paper is to extend the discussions on globalisation from production to R&D. It investigates how R&D and production interact with each other in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the discussions on globalisation from production to R&D. It investigates how R&D and production interact with each other in their globalisation processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The research aim is developed by identifying the gaps in the reviewed literature. This paper is based on four case studies undertaken in one Chinese manufacturing, one Danish pharmaceutical and two Danish manufacturing companies. The cases provide a sound basis for developing an understanding of the interaction between the globalisation of R&D and production.

Findings

This paper identifies three approaches the case companies followed to globalise their production and R&D: interactive globalisation, separated globalisation and a possible combination. The paper indicates that research and development might have to be treated separately with regard to their globalisation, and proposes industry and country characteristics as the key factors for globalisation approach selection, and site capability and strategic decision as the impacting factors for globalisation evolution.

Originality/value

This paper emphasises the dispersion of R&D activities, which is seldom addressed by existing internationalisation theories. Its investigation provides a foundation for the further extension of current internationalisation theories to consider global R&D. Moreover, the theoretical gap in the existing literature between global R&D and production is noted. This paper bridges this gap by clarifying the interaction between R&D and production in their globalisation, conceptualising three globalisation approaches, and proposing tentative factors that have impacts on approach selection and management.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Dirk Pieter van Donk

The food processing industry copes with high logistical demands from its customers. This paper studies a company changing to more customer‐ (order‐) driven manufacturing…

Abstract

The food processing industry copes with high logistical demands from its customers. This paper studies a company changing to more customer‐ (order‐) driven manufacturing. In order to help decide which products should be made to order and which made to stock, a frame is developed and applied to find and balance market and process characteristics. The frame is based on the well‐known Decoupling Point concept and adapted to the needs of the food processing industry. The application in the company helped management in deciding and implementing customer‐driven manufacturing. The main results were lower inventories and less obsolescence, while dependability remained the same. Further research should develop the frame, along with general decision rules for locating the Decoupling Point.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Fabio Nonino and Roberto Panizzolo

The paper seeks to investigate empirically the criticalities of a production system constrained by distribution, in order to propose a model capable of integrating…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to investigate empirically the criticalities of a production system constrained by distribution, in order to propose a model capable of integrating production and distribution planning for a simultaneous improvement in terms of efficiency and efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from an overview of previous works about integrated analysis of a production‐distribution system, an exploratory case study in the Italian industry of modular kitchens has been used, with multiple levels of analysis and multiple data collection methods.

Findings

Three solutions for a better integration of production‐distribution systems are proposed; the solutions are characterized by increasing levels of benefits and complexity. The article focuses on the implementation of the less complex scenario, called “overlapping of selling areas”, proposing a series of algorithms used for the implementation of a software prototype.

Research limitations/implications

The case study has been chosen because it is representative of the assemble to delivery logic, where production is pulled and constrained by distribution, but it may not necessarily reflect all the firm's experiences in the furniture market.

Practical implications

The software prototype, developed on the basis of the proposed algorithms, allows a firm with production planning severely constrained by the distribution process to achieve better performance in terms of level of accomplishment in the delivery date promised and reduction of the lead time of delivery.

Originality/value

This paper proposes effective solutions for customer order‐drivenproduction constrained by the distribution process, also offering practical help for managing and automatically assigning orders to transport carriers and for informing customers of the product's delivery date.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Liem Viet Ngo and Aron O'Cass

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for a value creation business (VCB) model. It seeks to unlock two essential research questions: “what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework for a value creation business (VCB) model. It seeks to unlock two essential research questions: “what constitutes value”, and “how do firms create value for customers?” in the context of the firm‐customer dyad.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual and is premised on a review of the extant literature on value and value creation. It addresses the limitations pertaining to the dominance of the value‐in‐use perspective. It also addresses the call for a paradigm shift toward customer‐centric marketing and operant resource‐based dominant logic. Building on the review, the paper identifies essential components of value in value creation processes.

Findings

The VCB model is developed by integrating three perspectives of value including creating value for customers, value‐in‐offering, and value‐in‐use, capturing a contingency approach to theory building. The model enlightens how value creation architecture (the strategic space of value creation processes) and value creation engineering (the capability space of value creation processes) engage in creating value outcomes for both the firm and the customer.

Practical implications

The VCB model constitutes guidelines useful for practitioners in crafting value‐based business processes and provides a base for academic researchers to further research on value and value creation.

Originality/value

The paper advances the literature on value by conceptualising value as consisting of the value offering and customer equity (the firm viewpoint), and customer value and brand equity (the customer viewpoint). The paper also highlights that value creation processes are initiated with the crafting of value creation architecture, followed by developing value creation engineering, and completed with value outcomes.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Arthur M. Harkins and George H. Kubik

This paper aims to focus on the production and application of seven knowledge production Modes in support of continuous innovation societies (CIS).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the production and application of seven knowledge production Modes in support of continuous innovation societies (CIS).

Design/methodology/approach

Seven tertiary educational archetypes are constructed as engines for creating and supporting CIS, with attention to the modal types of knowledge that each produces together with markets for this knowledge.

Findings

The most important “on the horizon” type of knowledge identified for the future of tertiary education is Mode III, or knowledge produced by and for the individual. The division of knowledge production is projected within tertiary education through leadership or lagging indicator choices, and the associated roles of faculty, students, and stakeholders.

Originality/value

Special emphasis is placed on the future of leapfrog campus, or the campus capable of, or aspiring to, new leadership status in support of CIS.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Ahmet Bardakci and Jeryl Whitelock

This paper addresses the issue of mass‐customisation from the point of view of consumer demand. It aims to develop a framework to examine the demand side of the…

Abstract

This paper addresses the issue of mass‐customisation from the point of view of consumer demand. It aims to develop a framework to examine the demand side of the mass‐customisation equation which will allow researchers to identify whether a market of customers who are ready for mass‐customised products exists. In doing so it considers in particular three “inconveniences” of mass‐customisation: the increased price of customised products; the delay in receipt of custom‐made products; and the need for customers to invest time in specifying their preferences before the product can be produced.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Shaker A. Zahra

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the interaction between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and market orientation and its effect on performance in both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the interaction between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and market orientation and its effect on performance in both high and low technology industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes that being entrepreneurial and marketdriven stem from two distinct organizational capabilities that interact to influence subsequent firm performance.

Findings

Data from 457 manufacturing firms show that the interaction effect is significant only in high technology industries.

Research limitations/implications

The results encourage future research on the nexus of opportunity recognition and entrepreneurial behavior in established firms embedded in organizational routines.

Originality/value

The paper shows that managers in high technology industries would benefit from developing capabilities and implementing systems that augment their firms' market orientation. Market orientation provides an important means to harness the firm's EO, an important means of achieving growth and profitability.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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