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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Agneta Ranerup and Helle Zinner Henriksen

Many countries today, especially in Europe, provide publicly funded public services in quasi-markets. As these markets commercialize, agencies of various types are…

Abstract

Purpose

Many countries today, especially in Europe, provide publicly funded public services in quasi-markets. As these markets commercialize, agencies of various types are providing technologies that support citizens’ choice of services. Citizens’ use of technologies for service provision is studied as e-government under labels of channel management, e-service uptake or adoption. In contrast, by using actor–network theory (ANT), the purpose of this paper is to focus on the marketing devices that are used to enroll citizens to choose technologies in a context with large penetration of quasi-market arrangements.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a Swedish case study, this paper uses qualitative data from 11 occurrences of technologies to support citizens’ choice (“market devices”) in education, healthcare and public pension in an analysis of the means taken (“marketing devices”) to increase their use. The study formulates a tentative typology of these devices.

Findings

The marketing devices are intended to attract citizens’ attention to the possibility of choice (e.g. catalogs, postcards and commercials), invite interaction (e.g. various social media platforms), improve the technological support in line with user needs (e.g. user participation in development), increase visibility of technological support (e.g. search optimization) or directly connect citizens to technological support (e.g. via links).

Originality/value

The paper contributes to e-government research through a typology of means taken to increase citizens’ technology use based on selected concepts from ANT, and to a discussion of technologies and humans.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Belinda Dewsnap and David Jobber

The study explores structural devices designed to enhance collaboration between sales and marketing groups. The paper aims to develop a conceptual framework of how such…

Abstract

Purpose

The study explores structural devices designed to enhance collaboration between sales and marketing groups. The paper aims to develop a conceptual framework of how such integrative devices link to higher levels of sales‐marketing collaboration and also to higher levels of business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 in‐depth interviews and a review of the literature are used to examine the nature and effects of sales‐marketing integrative devices in UK consumer packaged goods firms.

Findings

The study identifies two main types of integrative device in operation: trade marketing and category management. The exploratory interviews highlight how these two types of integrative device operate, respectively, at operational and strategic levels. All of the organisations were found to operate some kind of integrative device. However, the organisations studied manifest different levels of collaboration between sales and marketing groups. The conclusion drawn from this and subsequently included in the conceptual framework is that it is the effectiveness of integrative devices, rather than their mere existence, that differentiates between higher and lower levels of sales‐marketing collaboration.

Practical implications

The effectiveness of sales‐marketing integrative devices appears to have positive effects for collaborative sales‐marketing intergroup relations. The results therefore support the development and effective use of such devices to enhance collaborative relations between sales and marketing.

Originality/value

This study reveals the importance and dimensions of effective sales‐marketing integrative devices and uses in‐depth interviews to support the development of a conceptual framework for future empirical testing. Specific hypotheses to test are developed, together with suggestions regarding the measurement of constructs.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Areej Aftab Siddiqui and Parul Singh

Medical device industry in India is a niche sector with few key players but it possesses huge potential for both domestic and international trade. In recent years, a…

Abstract

Purpose

Medical device industry in India is a niche sector with few key players but it possesses huge potential for both domestic and international trade. In recent years, a number of regulatory relaxations have been provided to medical device manufacturers in India to enhance production and further trade especially exports. Though the industry is highly dependent on imports, the purpose of this paper is to identify key medical devices using the revealed comparative advantage, which can be exported from India by identifying new markets.

Design/methodology/approach

For the selected medical devices, India’s exports to the world and the newly identified markets are forecasted using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of regression.

Findings

It is seen that three major medical devices emerge to be the ones where India has the capacity and potential to manufacture and export. These medical devices are electro-cardiographs, magnetic resonance imaging apparatus and oscilloscopes and oscillographs being exported to the USA, Australia; China and the USA, respectively, which is rising in recent years.

Research limitations/implications

As the forecasted values indicate that there is an increasing potential in exports from India to the world of the selected medical devices, there is an urgent need to develop this industry and enhance exports from India. Very few studies have been carried out to examine and forecast exports from specific sectors or industries which is the need of the hour now.

Originality/value

The paper also provides suggestions to exporters and policymakers on leveraging the future export potential of selected medical devices.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Unnati Narang and Venkatesh Shankar

Mobile marketing, the two- or multi-way communication and promotion of an offer between a firm and its customers using a mobile medium, device, platform, or technology…

Abstract

Mobile marketing, the two- or multi-way communication and promotion of an offer between a firm and its customers using a mobile medium, device, platform, or technology, has made rapid strides in the past several years. Mobile marketing has entered its second phase or Mobile Marketing 2.0. The surpassing of desktop by mobile devices in digital media consumption, diffusion of wearable devices among customers, and an overall integration and interconnectedness of devices characterize this phase. Against this backdrop, we present a synthesis of the most recent literature in mobile marketing. We discuss three key advances in mobile marketing research relating to mobile targeting, personalization, and mobile-led cross-channel effects. We outline emerging industry trends in mobile marketing, including mobile app monetization, augmented reality, data and privacy, wearable devices, driverless vehicles, the Internet of Things, and artificial intelligence. Within each extant and emerging area, we delineate the future research opportunities in mobile marketing. Finally, we discuss the impact of mobile marketing on customer, firm, and societal outcomes.

Details

Marketing in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-339-1

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Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Hans Kjellberg, Johan Hagberg and Franck Cochoy

This chapter explores the concept of market infrastructure, which is tentatively defined as a materially heterogeneous arrangement that silently supports and structures…

Abstract

This chapter explores the concept of market infrastructure, which is tentatively defined as a materially heterogeneous arrangement that silently supports and structures the consummation of market exchanges. Specifically, the authors investigate the enactment of market infrastructure in the US grocery retail sector by exploring how barcodes and related devices contributed to modify its market infrastructure during the period 1967–2010. Combining this empirical case with insights from previous research, the authors propose that market infrastructures are relational, available for use, modular, actively maintained, interdependent, commercial, emergent and political. The authors argue that this conception of market infrastructure provides a powerful tool for unveiling the complex agencements and engineering efforts that underpin seemingly superficial, individual and isolated market exchanges.

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Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2016

William H. Kitchens

This chapter focuses on the regulatory scheme used by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve medical products for commercial use in this country…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the regulatory scheme used by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve medical products for commercial use in this country. After providing a brief introduction of the role of the FDA and the scope of the products regulated by the agency, the chapter outlines the common characteristics of premarket controls for drugs, medical devices, and biological products, including how clinical trials of these medical products are conducted with humans as part of the premarket approval process. The chapter then provides a detailed examination of the particular regulatory scheme for each product category. The chapter concludes with an analysis of how FDA regulates emerging medical technologies, such as cellular and tissue-engineered products. FDA regulates a variety of products intended to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent diseases or conditions under a legal scheme established in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the Public Health Service Act and regulations promulgated by FDA. How a product is classified (drug, device, or biologic) forecasts the regulatory approval pathway that must be followed to bring the product to market. This chapter provides education and direction regarding regulatory requirements that must be met to market medical products in the United States.

Details

Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Results
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-238-5

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Michael Mackert and Tracie Harrison

The paper seeks to raise awareness of the issues surrounding marketing of medically implanted devices, a logical extension of issues now debated on direct‐to‐consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to raise awareness of the issues surrounding marketing of medically implanted devices, a logical extension of issues now debated on direct‐to‐consumer pharmaceutical advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

Parallels from the direct‐to‐consumer marketing of pharmaceuticals provide a context for discussion of the marketing efforts of a specific medically implanted device: cochlear implants for children.

Findings

Since CI implantation is controversial among some members of the deaf community, the marketing of the product for children raises additional issues beyond those of many other devices or drugs. The omission of this concern in the marketing materials targeting parents overlooks a significant cultural risk that could derail desirable marketing efforts.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers should initiate investigation of consumer perceptions of surgically implanted medical devices and related issues, to provide guidance for health professionals, marketers, and policymakers.

Practical implications

In the interest of designing ethical messages, engendering consumer trust, and improving sales, health marketing should consider the full array of issues surrounding surgically implanted devices and design promotional messages accordingly.

Originality/value

Raising important issues regarding the marketing of a surgically implanted medical device can encourage future responsible marketing of the technology.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Arnulf Kolstad

In 1983, the Nordic countries took the first steps towards standardising the quality assurance system for sterile single‐use medical devices. Today, the Nordic authorities…

Abstract

In 1983, the Nordic countries took the first steps towards standardising the quality assurance system for sterile single‐use medical devices. Today, the Nordic authorities have agreed on the same quality assurance procedures for these products and the system is expanding to other groups of medical devices. The approach taken to assure the quality of medical devices is described and the value of standardisation, the use of pre‐market regulations and post‐market control is discussed, together with the concept of good manufacturing practice (GMP).

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Marta Podemska-Mikluch

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Parallel Review program that offers simultaneous review of the Food and Drug Administration premarket approval submissions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Parallel Review program that offers simultaneous review of the Food and Drug Administration premarket approval submissions and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) national coverage determinations (NCDs) of medical devices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes the impact of Parallel Review on medical device innovation, focusing in particular on the causes for low popularity of the program among medical device manufacturers. Program outcomes are evaluated in the light of its intended goals.

Findings

The paper identifies four reasons for the program’s limited impact. First, few devices are eligible to participate. Second, most manufacturers prefer to seek Medicare reimbursement at the local level as less risky than the CMS NCDs. Third, participation in the Parallel Review might actually delay the marketing of the device. Fourth, the program does not address numerous obstacles that device sponsors currently encounter. While giving the appearance of support for the medical device innovation, the policy falls short on its intended goals.

Originality/value

This paper elucidates the challenges to internal reform and serves as a reminder to political economists and health care researchers that to make disruptive innovation possible, we must continue to illuminate the otherwise unseen cost of marketing delays and document the ability of emergent market mechanisms to protect consumer safety.

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Jennifer Smith Maguire

Purpose: This paper adopts a practice-oriented approach to address gaps in existing knowledge of the significance of cultural producers’ and intermediaries’ practices of…

Abstract

Purpose: This paper adopts a practice-oriented approach to address gaps in existing knowledge of the significance of cultural producers’ and intermediaries’ practices of taste for the construction and organization of markets. Using the example of the cultural field of “natural” wine, I propose how taste operates as a logic of practice, generating market actions in relation to the aesthetic regime of provenance.

Methodology/approach: The paper sets out the conceptual relationship between aesthetic regimes and practices of taste. The discussion draws from interpretive research on natural wine producers and cultural intermediaries involving 40 interviews with natural wine makers, retailers, sommeliers, and writers based in New York, Western Australia, the Champagne region, and the Cape Winelands.

Findings: Three dimensions of how taste is translated into action are examined: as a device of division, which establishes a fuzzy logic of resemblance; as a device of operation, which provides an intuitive platform for shaping the means of production; and as a device of coordination, which enables an embedded experience of trust.

Originality/value: The paper’s discussion of dispositions, affect, intuition, and pattern identification provide new insights into the translation of taste into action, and the macro-organization of markets. I argue for attention to how cultural producers and cultural intermediaries are mobilized through their habitual sense of taste, shifting the focus away from consumers to those whose market actions are largely self- and peer-referential. This is important for understanding processes of market development and value construction.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-907-8

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