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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Jeong Yong Ahn, Seok Ki Kim and Kyung Soo Han

In the past few years, information technology has stimulated several innovations in the business and marketing fields, and advances in the technology are changing the…

Abstract

In the past few years, information technology has stimulated several innovations in the business and marketing fields, and advances in the technology are changing the research surrounding those fields. Recently, focusing topics in the management and marketing field are electronic customer relationship management (CRM) and the practical use of marketing data and information technology. The goal of this article is not to provide an all‐inclusive tutorial on CRM but rather to provide fundamental concepts behind CRM and some aspects of the system development process. This article provides a comprehensive review of CRM and marketing data sources, and consider some design concepts for creating an effective CRM system from the viewpoint of practical use of the data sources.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 103 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2019

Devon S. Johnson, Laurent Muzellec, Debika Sihi and Debra Zahay

This paper aims to improve understanding of data-driven marketing by examining the experiences of managers implementing big data analytics in the marketing function…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve understanding of data-driven marketing by examining the experiences of managers implementing big data analytics in the marketing function. Through a series of research questions, this exploratory study seeks to define what big data analytics means in marketing practice. It also seeks to uncover the challenges and identifiable stages of big data analytics implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 15 open-ended in-depth interviews were conducted with marketing and analytics executives in a variety of industries in Ireland and the USA. Interview transcripts were subjected to open coding and axial coding to address the research questions.

Findings

The study reveals that managers consider marketing big data analytics to be a series of tools and capabilities used to inform product innovation and marketing strategy-making processes and to defend the brand against emerging risks. Additionally, the study reveals that big data analytics implementation is championed at different organizational levels using different types of dynamic learning capabilities, contingent on the champion’s stature within the organization.

Originality/value

From the qualitative analysis, it is proposed that marketing departments undergo five stages of big data analytics implementation: sprouting, recognition, commitment, culture shift and data-driven marketing. Each stage identifies the key characteristics and potential pitfalls to be avoided and provides advice to marketing managers on how to implement big data analytics.

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Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1970

Hartmut J. Will

Examines computerised marketing information systems and considers the implications of their role and the major characteristics of such systems and discusses the DEMON…

Abstract

Examines computerised marketing information systems and considers the implications of their role and the major characteristics of such systems and discusses the DEMON model in detail. States that a system is a set of components which interact in a certain manner to achieve its goals; an open system is distinguished from a closed one by the fact that interaction exists with its environment; since most organisations must be considered as open systems, their environment becomes a dialectic part of any systems definition. Concludes that computerised marketing information systems will never be able to replace the questioning human mind.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Martin Evans

Although very much in vogue in both academic discourse and practitioner rhetoric, presents a case for a need to be concerned over the use of the “R” (relational) word in…

Abstract

Although very much in vogue in both academic discourse and practitioner rhetoric, presents a case for a need to be concerned over the use of the “R” (relational) word in marketing. But even this needs to be implemented with caution and sensitivity as evidence on how consumers react to the approach shows. In an era of self service and disintermediation, marketers are increasingly turning to customer data instead of the tacit understanding of customers they used to possess when interaction was on a more personal basis. There are, however, concerns over the nature of the data collected and the way in which it is used, that lead to a proposition that relationship marketing can be an oxymoron. Also, however, suggests a number of compromise solutions in an era in which marketers are unlikely to abandon the paradigm. If marketing reverted to earlier paradigms rather than promising cynical consumers a “relationship”, perhaps all parties might actually start to gain more trust in each other. Personal rather than relational interaction would indeed be more pragmatic.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

M. Elizabeth Haywood and Anubha Mishra

The purpose of this paper is to describe how brief exercises in introductory and advanced marketing courses can help business students achieve a broader understanding of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how brief exercises in introductory and advanced marketing courses can help business students achieve a broader understanding of what Big data and data analytics mean in the workplace. These short analytics problems fit into the culture that we are building at our institution to create analytics cases for courses within our business curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

A database of 1,500 customer reviews for a fictitious sporting company was created. Two exercises based on text mining and sentiment analysis were developed to be tested in introductory and advanced marketing course. Students were introduced to the basic concepts used in data analysis and the creation of R code for extracting sentiment words was demonstrated. Students then used pivot tables to identify patterns in the given data set. Students in the introductory course completed a short exercise while the students in the advanced class developed a detailed memo.

Findings

Results suggest that students in the introductory course are significantly more aware of the use of data in the industry as well as methods to deal with Big data after completing the exercise as compared to their knowledge at the beginning of the exercise. Students in the advanced course are able to identify patterns, detect shortcoming and propose strategic plans based on their analysis of the data.

Originality/value

Proposed exercises in the study are developed with an aim to help business schools develop a culture supportive of analytics. The purpose of these exercises is to make students aware of the importance of Big data and analytics early on in their curriculum and reinforce their exposure in an advanced course.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Gerrit H. van Bruggen, Ale Smidts and Berend Wierenga

Conceptualizes the impact of information technology on marketing decision making. Argues that developments in information technology affect the performance of marketing

Abstract

Conceptualizes the impact of information technology on marketing decision making. Argues that developments in information technology affect the performance of marketing decision‐makers through different routes. Advances in information technology enhance the possibilities of collecting data and of generating information for supporting marketing decision making. Potentially, this will have a positive impact on decision‐making performance. Managerial expertise will favor the transformation of data into market insights. However, as the cognitive capabilities of marketing managers are limited, increasing amounts of data may also increase the complexity of the decision‐making context. In turn, increased complexity enhances the probability of biased decision processes, thereby negatively affecting decision‐making performance. Marketing management support systems, also being the result of advances in information technology, are tools that can help marketers to benefit from the data explosion. The analysis leads to the expectation that the combination of marketing data, managerial judgment, and marketing management support systems will be a powerful factor for improving marketing management.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

CARMEL MAGUIRE and EUGENIA LOVELACE

Marketing staff in Australian food manufacturing firms were questioned on use of and expenditure on advertising and marketing information services, on the sources from…

Abstract

Marketing staff in Australian food manufacturing firms were questioned on use of and expenditure on advertising and marketing information services, on the sources from which they derive new ideas, and on favoured strategies for different aspects of their work. The thirty replies are presented in the framework of marketing theory and of Australian food marketing practice. Some clear contrasts arise between high and low information users though the sample is too small to reveal systematic variations according to size of firm, type of industry, etc. The most striking findings are the high value placed by the marketers on product movement data, the difficulty in getting expenditure data, and the lack of use of formal external information sources, especially the online databases, whether those specialising in marketing data or those with demographic and general economic data of relevance.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Edward J. Ferraro

This paper aims to analyze and discuss the implications of the August 2010 decision of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals vacating and remanding to the SEC its December…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze and discuss the implications of the August 2010 decision of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals vacating and remanding to the SEC its December 2008 order approving a proposed fee filed by NYSE Arca, LLC for its depth‐of‐book product ArcaBook. It also seeks to consider the effect on the court's decision of the Dodd‐Frank Act amendments to Section 19(b) of the Exchange Act.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes the evolution of the SEC's policy regarding SRO market data fees including the 1999 Concept Release on Market Information, the Advisory Committee on Market Information, the effects of decimalization and the 2005 adoption of Regulation NMS. It focuses on market data fee policy in connection with the Commission's decade‐long project to increase the role of competition in the US securities markets, culminating in the 2006 NYSE Arca fee filing, the SEC's 2008 order approving those fees and the NetCoalition decision.

Findings

The court's decision that a cost analysis is not irrelevant to the SEC's review of proposed SRO fee filings brings clarity and finality to a long‐standing dispute within the Commission and the securities industry and identifies a procedure for reaching an economically sound determination of “fair and reasonable” fees for SRO market data.

Practical implications

A cost‐based analysis of SRO market data fee filings is likely to result in a significant decline in market data revenues for those exchanges that charge fees for their data. For the Commission, cost‐based analysis is likely to require a significant reallocation of its regulatory staff and resources.

Originality/value

The paper presents a useful analysis for securities regulatory lawyers and financial analysts and investors following the stock exchange and financial information industries.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Geoffrey Kiel

This article aims firstly to show how the introduction of new computer hardware can bring considerably more power and control to data processing for marketing researchers…

Abstract

This article aims firstly to show how the introduction of new computer hardware can bring considerably more power and control to data processing for marketing researchers. Secondly, it discusses the use of basic statistical techniques as an aid to effective marketing decision making. Thirdly, it comments on the effective use of multidimensional and mutivariate techniques. It concludes that, given that the major expense in marketing research is often data collection, it is essential that data analysis be effectively used to unveil the true marketing implications of the findings.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Lee Wilson

Abstract

Details

Data-driven Marketing Content
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-818-6

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