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Article

Anthony K. Asare, Thomas G. Brashear, Jing Yang and Jun Kang

The purpose of this paper is to test the market‐based asset framework by examining the role of marketing process improvements in the relationship between a buyer firm's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the market‐based asset framework by examining the role of marketing process improvements in the relationship between a buyer firm's supplier‐related activities and its performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with executives who were involved in supplier development were conducted to learn more about supplier development and to help in the development of the survey constructs. A self‐report survey was then developed online to collect data for the study. In total, 338 executives responded and partial least squares (PLS) structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses developed in the study.

Findings

Marketing process improvements were found to mediate the relationship between a firm's supplier development efforts and firm performance, thus providing empirical support for the market‐based asset framework. The study also found that a firm's supplier development activities can lead to improvements in its marketing processes.

Originality/value

For too long, a firm's supply chain has been seen as the primary domain of the supply chain and operations department, even though supply chain decisions and errors have a considerable impact on the ability of marketing professionals to perform. The findings in this study demonstrate the value of the relationship between a firm's supply chain and its marketing activities and as such makes the case for marketing executives to be more involved in supply chain activities.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part

Mark S. Glynn

This paper focuses on the role of manufacturer brands for resellers within retail channels. This topic is important because of the strategic value of manufacturer brands…

Abstract

This paper focuses on the role of manufacturer brands for resellers within retail channels. This topic is important because of the strategic value of manufacturer brands and the increasing influence of resellers within channels of distribution. Much of the branding research emphasizes a customer-brand knowledge perspective; however, emerging perspectives suggest that brands are also relevant to other stakeholders including resellers. In contrast, channels research recognizes the manufacturer sources of market power, but does not consider the impact of manufacturer “push and pull” strategies within channels. Existing theoretical frameworks, therefore, do not address the reseller perspective of the brand. As a result, the research approach is a multi-method design, consisting of two phases. The first phase involves in-depth interviews, allowing the development of a conceptual framework. In the second phase, a survey of supermarket buyers on brands in several product categories tests this framework. Structural equation modeling analyzes the survey responses and tests the hypotheses. The structural model shows very good fit to the data with good construct validity, reliability, and stability. The findings show that manufacturer support, brand equity, and customer demand reflect the manufacturer brand benefits to resellers. A key contribution of this research is the development of a validated scale on manufacturer brand benefits from the point of view of a reseller. This research shows that the resources that relate to the brand, not just the brand name itself, create value for resellers in channel relationships.

Details

Business-To-Business Brand Management: Theory, Research and Executivecase Study Exercises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-671-3

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Article

Mark S. Glynn, Judy Motion and Roderick J. Brodie

The aim of the paper is to develop a conceptual framework that explores the sources of manufacturer brand benefits for resellers.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to develop a conceptual framework that explores the sources of manufacturer brand benefits for resellers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports a qualitative investigation where packaged goods resellers were interviewed about the benefits of manufacturer brands for their businesses. The qualitative data is analysed to develop several research propositions about the role of brands in reseller B2B relationships.

Findings

A conceptual framework is developed that shows that manufacturers' brands provide financial, customer and managerial benefits for resellers. These benefits have an impact on reseller relationship outcomes with the manufacturer's brand, which include satisfaction, dependence, cooperation, commitment and trust.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework provides a model that manufacturers of both major and minor brands can use to understand and manage these brand benefits in order to enhance the relationship outcomes with resellers.

Originality/value

The paper responds to a need for empirical research to understand the role that brands play in channel relationships. It presents a conceptual framework that links manufacturer brand benefits to reseller relationship outcomes. The framework also includes major and minor brands as moderating variables and thus provides a basis for further quantitative research.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part

Mark S. Glynn

This chapter examines the empirical evidence about business-to-business (B2B) brands and offers implications for value creation. Brand marketing texts typically emphasize…

Abstract

This chapter examines the empirical evidence about business-to-business (B2B) brands and offers implications for value creation. Brand marketing texts typically emphasize the competitive advantage of strong brands but often assume a consumer branding (B2C) perspective. However some of the world's most valuable brands are predominantly B2B in nature, and the question arises regarding the importance of branding in B2B marketing. This chapter examines the following question. How do B2B brands create and deliver value for firms in interorganizational transactions? The chapter begins by examining the relevance of current theoretical frameworks of branding in the B2B context and the stages of the brand value chain. Next, the chapter considers extant research showing the impact of B2B branding at the various stages of the brand value chain. The chapter also suggests areas for future research in B2B branding and concludes with a reader case study.

Details

Business-to-Business Marketing Management: Strategies, Cases, and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-576-1

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Marc Schaffer

This macroeconomic analysis chronicles the risk behavior of market-based financial intermediaries and traditional depository institutions from 1980 to 2010 and assesses…

Abstract

Purpose

This macroeconomic analysis chronicles the risk behavior of market-based financial intermediaries and traditional depository institutions from 1980 to 2010 and assesses the role that competition, financial innovation and regulation played in their evolving risk behaviors. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a two-part CAPM framework in line with Campbell et al. (2001), risk measures are constructed through the decomposition of industry-level risk and firm-level idiosyncratic risk. These constructed measures are used in a VAR model with a historical decomposition approach to assess the impact of the three factors on the relative risk behavior of these firms.

Findings

The results indicate that the market-based and traditional intermediaries exhibited a period of diverging relative average firm-level risk behavior followed by a period of converging risk behavior. Using the derived firm-level risk measures, the impact of competition, financial innovation and regulatory changes on explaining these changing risk behaviors is explored. The results suggest that regulatory changes (i.e. deregulation) can best explain the relative risk behavior over the divergence period through late 1999 relative to the other two variables. The period from November 1999 through the financial crisis marks the converging risk behaviors across these intermediaries. Over this period, the changing nature of competition played the most important role in driving these behaviors.

Originality/value

The key contribution of this analysis highlights the evolutionary changes in the risk behaviors of market-based and traditional financial intermediaries and the factors driving both their diverging and converging nature over time.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 45 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article

Cynthia J. Bean and Leroy Robinson

A potential weakness of marketing in the strategy dialogue has been a tendency on the part of marketing scholars to stay with outmoded frameworks. As the economy is…

Abstract

A potential weakness of marketing in the strategy dialogue has been a tendency on the part of marketing scholars to stay with outmoded frameworks. As the economy is decreasingly influenced by industrial value creation and increasingly influenced by knowledge creation and dissemination, the role of marketing in value creation and thus in strategy is accentuated. Synthesizing current literature regarding the environmental changes and the underlying foundations for value creation affected by these changes, and contrasting them to traditional, industrial value creation, an argument for the central role of marketing in the knowledge economy is provided and examples support the new value creation‐marketing link.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 17 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Yoshie Saito

This paper aims to analyze the association between goodwill defined as difference between market and book value of equity and reports of nonrecurring items, namely…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the association between goodwill defined as difference between market and book value of equity and reports of nonrecurring items, namely, special items, discontinued operations and extraordinary items to suggest information related to restructuring activities measured by these items can link the valuation and incentive roles of accounting. Economic intuition suggests that successful managerial efforts should increase firm value. Yet, the link between the valuation and stewardship roles of earnings has been difficult to verify.

Design/methodology/approach

The author first estimates whether nonrecurring items have an incremental ability to explain goodwill, measured as the difference between market and book value of equity, at the industry level and then estimates whether firm-specific accounting bias is associated with the industry-level signals sent by nonrecurring items. The author then analyzes whether these items are associated with the use of chief executive officer (CEO) market-based compensation.

Findings

The author’ results show that information contained in special items increases firm-specific goodwill, indicating that it sends signals to investors about future growth opportunities, while that of discontinued operations reduces goodwill, suggesting that it provides signals about the adjustments of book value. She does not find any significant informational role for extraordinary items. She also finds that the signals sent by special items are negatively associated with the use of CEO market-based compensation, while those relayed by discontinued operations are positively associated with the use of market-based pay.

Research limitations/implications

Contrary to prior studies, the results show special items and discontinued operations are both value and incentive relevant. There are two caveats to this analysis. First, owing to the frequent changes in the definition of discontinued operations, the analysis is conducted using data between 1992 and 2003. Second, some might argue that industry-level incremental R2 might not be appropriate for a compensation analysis. However, entities often use industry norms as a benchmark to set CEO compensation. Thus, it is reasonable to think that industry-level signals matter for executive pay.

Originality/value

The author’s findings suggest that compensation committees in firms across industries consider the information contained in special items and discontinued operations, and selectively alter the level of incentives to encourage managerial efforts.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

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Article

Sheilla Nyasha and N.M. Odhiambo

This paper aims to survey the existing literature on the causal relationship between market-based financial development and economic growth – in both developed and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to survey the existing literature on the causal relationship between market-based financial development and economic growth – in both developed and developing countries, highlighting the theoretical and the empirical evidence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper divides financial development into bank-based and market-based financial development, and it closely reviews the international literature on the relationship between market-based financial development and economic growth.

Findings

The direction of causality between market-based financial development and economic growth varies from one country to another, depending on various country-specific characteristics, data sets and the methodology used by the researcher. On balance, there is predominant support for the supply-leading response, where the development of the market-based financial sector is expected to precede the development of the real sector.

Originality/value

This review differs fundamentally from previous reviews, in that it divides financial development into bank-based and market-based financial development, and it focuses closely on market-based financial development and economic growth. The majority of the previous studies on this subject failed to make such a distinction, thereby focusing mainly on the general causal relationship between the overall financial development and economic growth. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this may be the first review of its kind to survey the existing research in detail on the causal relationship between market-based financial development and economic growth, in both developed and developing countries.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

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