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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Anneke Zuiderwijk and Mark de Reuver

Existing overviews of barriers for openly sharing and using government data are often conceptual or based on a limited number of cases. Furthermore, it is unclear what…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing overviews of barriers for openly sharing and using government data are often conceptual or based on a limited number of cases. Furthermore, it is unclear what categories of barriers are most obstructive for attaining open data objectives. This paper aims to categorize and prioritize barriers for openly sharing and using government data based on many existing Open Government Data Initiatives (OGDIs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes 171 survey responses concerning existing OGDIs worldwide.

Findings

The authors found that the most critical OGDI barrier categories concern (in order of most to least critical): functionality and support; inclusiveness; economy, policy and process; data interpretation; data quality and resources; legislation and access; and sustainability. Policymakers should prioritize solving functionality and support barriers and inclusiveness barriers because the authors found that these are the most obstructive in attaining OGDI objectives.

Practical implications

The prioritization of open data barriers calls for three main actions by practitioners to reduce the barrier impact: open data portal developers should develop advanced tools to support data search, analysis, visualization, interpretation and interaction; open data experts and teachers should train potential users, and especially those currently excluded from OGDIs because of a lack of digital skills; and government agencies that provide open data should put user-centered design and the user experience central to better support open data users.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the open data literature by proposing a new, empirically based barrier categorization and prioritization based a large number of existing OGDIs.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Harry Bouwman, Shahrokh Nikou, Francisco J. Molina-Castillo and Mark de Reuver

This paper aims to explore how digital technologies have forced small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to reconsider and experiment with their business models (BMs) and…

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50594

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how digital technologies have forced small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to reconsider and experiment with their business models (BMs) and how this contributes to their innovativeness and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study has been conducted on 338 European SMEs actively using social media and big data to innovate their BMs. Four in-depth case studies of companies involved in BM innovation have also been carried out.

Findings

Findings show that the use of social media and big data in BMI is mainly driven by strategic and innovation-related internal motives. External technology turbulence plays a role too. BMI driven by social media and big data has a positive impact on business performance. Analysis of the case studies shows that BM is driven by big data rather than by social media.

Research limitations/implications

Research into big data- and social media-driven BMs needs more insight into how components are affected and how SMEs are experimenting with adjusting their BMs, specifically in terms of human and organizational factors.

Practical implications

Findings of this study can be used by managers and top-level executives to better understand how firms experiment with BMI, what affects business model components and how implementation might affect BMI performance.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first research contributions to analyse the impact of digitalization, specifically the impact of social media and big data on a large number of European SMEs.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2012

Shahrokh Nikou, Harry Bouwman and Mark de Reuver

Fearing that their voice and SMS business will be substituted by IP‐based services from internet companies, mobile operators are developing various IP multimedia subsystem

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2018

Abstract

Purpose

Fearing that their voice and SMS business will be substituted by IP‐based services from internet companies, mobile operators are developing various IP multimedia subsystem (IMS) based technologies to enable richer communication services. They reason that since the new rich communication services – such as enhanced presence, group communication and seamless switching between devices and media types within the same communication session – provide secure and more reliable services than those offered by internet companies – Skype, Whatsapp and Google+, for instance – consumers will readily appreciate their services and consequently use them. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To validate these claims, this study analyzes the results of a conjoint survey among 82 respondents in The Netherlands, France and Spain. Are users really willing to adopt these rich communication services and, if so, do issues like reliability, privacy and security impact their decision?

Finding

The results indicate that while users are most interested in “group communication” features of rich communication services, they appreciate other services like “switching devices”, “switching media during communication sessions” and “file‐sharing”. Still, for all services, reliability, security and interoperability (i.e. switching between devices) are valued as important requirements.

Research limitation/implications

These findings contribute to the debate on platform competition, as these rich communication services are provided on the basis of the IMS platform, while competing services are offered via an internet base platform.

Originality/ value

This paper contributes to the discussion in the mobile telecommunications domain on whether and how operators can counter the threat from internet players that look to take over their voice and SMS business. Theoretically, this paper will contribute both to understanding why users intend to adopt advanced mobile services and creating insight into the consumer‐related factors that drive the war between competing service platforms.

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Fatemeh Nikayin and Mark De Reuver

– The purpose of this paper is to study what motivates small businesses to engage in collective action, especially in high-tech industry.

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1413

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study what motivates small businesses to engage in collective action, especially in high-tech industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Application domain is smart living industry, in which installation companies offer ICT-enabled solutions for smart home services. A survey was conducted among 140 small/medium installation companies in smart living industry which are members of a major Dutch branch organization. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was used to model and analyse data from the survey.

Findings

The paper found that different types of motivations do not significantly increase the collective orientation of small businesses. Moreover, the current involvement of small companies in smart living projects is not directly related to their collective orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of collaboration is resulting in market fragmentation and lack of technological interoperability. The paper advise policy makers to provide selective incentives to stimulate collaboration and to facilitate knowledge sharing on best practices and collective business cases.

Originality/value

The motivational factors for collective action between small businesses in high-tech sectors have rarely been studied. Although many studies addresses collective action issues on an individual level, the literature lacks an integration of existing theories into a set of testable hypotheses that aim at motivators and inhibitors of inter-organizational collective action.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Mark de Reuver

This paper seeks to study how interorganizational governance mechanisms within mobile eco‐systems are affected by the end of the walled gardens and what this implies for

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1705

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to study how interorganizational governance mechanisms within mobile eco‐systems are affected by the end of the walled gardens and what this implies for developing mobile internet services.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from concepts on interorganizational governance, the paper conducts an extensive case study on how the Dutch walled garden i‐mode portal evolved in an open WAP‐based portal.

Findings

The transition of walled garden to open portals dramatically changes governance mechanisms between operator and content providers. Authority‐based governance in the form of operator rules, contracts‐based governance in the form of formalized agreements, and trust‐based governance in the form of close collaboration all reduced following the end of the walled garden.

Research limitations/implications

The author demonstrates that theoretical concepts of interorganizational governance are relevant for actors within the mobile ecosystem to understand, next to regulatory, technical and market mechanisms, if they are to provide value to the customers as well as to the eco‐system itself.

Originality/value

Although scholars often agree that the choice between walled gardens and open models will influence service innovation, existing studies do not systematically study how governance between operators and content providers changes when the mobile eco‐system is transforming from walled gardens to open models. Although this paper focuses on the relation between operators and content providers, the power shift to hardware and platform providers implies that governance is still highly relevant. As walled gardens also emerge in other areas of ICT‐enabled services, for instance in the Smart Living domain, the insights will be valuable for studies on ICT‐enabled service industries as well.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2009

Mark de Reuver, Tim de Koning, Harry Bouwman and Wolter Lemstra

The purpose of this paper is to explore how technological and strategic developments enable new billing processes for mobile content services.

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1365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how technological and strategic developments enable new billing processes for mobile content services.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with practitioners are used as input for designing different archetypical role division models for billing and process models. The potential of these process models to reshape the mobile industry is evaluated on three criteria: convenience for the end‐user; potential resource barriers; and the fit with strategic interests of the actors involved.

Findings

Both technological advances and the introduction of new roles and strategies in the mobile domain enable the emergence of alternative billing methods. While network operator‐centric models remain relevant in the short term, in the longer term they will co‐exist with other models in which the customer transaction is owned by the content aggregator, the content provider, the ISP or the payment provider.

Research limitations/implications

The research demonstrates the relevance of analysis at the process level in assessing the feasibility of new role division models at the value creation level.

Practical implications

The emergence of alternative billing providers is expected to change the power balance in the value network and assist in opening up the “walled garden”.

Originality/value

The analysis extends beyond existing discussions on billing in the mobile industry, which typically focus on the value network level, as the process level and the related resources are included. Moreover, the empirical data from the interviews with practitioners at various organizations provide new insights into the feasibility of these models in practice.

Details

info, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Mihai Constantinescu, Ertan Onur, Yunus Durmus, Shahrokh Nikou, Mark de Reuver, Harry Bouwman, Miodrag Djurica and Philipp Maria Glatz

The purpose of this paper is to analyze mobile tethering from technological and social perspectives. Mobile tethering allows us to share cellular data connection with…

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1910

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze mobile tethering from technological and social perspectives. Mobile tethering allows us to share cellular data connection with others over WiFi, Bluetooth or USB. Although the technology is ready and has promising outcomes, service providers and the users still keep their distance. Therefore, the incentives for the users and service providers should be identified.

Design/methodology/approach

Technical challenges in terms of energy and bandwidth consumption are explored using an application specifically developed for mobile tethering. Usage issues are studied through conjoint analysis, in which we analyze the importance of technical aspects as well as social conditions for sharing data connection with others.

Findings

The research shows that although energy, bandwidth and security are important technical challenges, users are mainly concerned about social aspects, such as with whom the connection will be shared, rather than monetary issues. Mobile tethering is a viable cooperative service, only when users are familiar with the person with whom the data connection is being shared.

Research limitations/implications

In the technical evaluation of the mobile tethering application, only Android operating systems are being used. Other operating systems (e.g. iOS) may perform differently. Moreover, only a small fraction of smartphones and tablets has been tested.

Practical implications

Service providers tend to block mobile tethering technology, as they do not have control and do not expect to gain revenues. However, service providers have the abilities to satisfy the security and privacy concerns of the users and can create secure femtocells for their customers.

Social implications

Mobile tethering performance results indicate that more people can access the Internet while they are mobile even if they do not have cellular data subscription. More Internet-based services can be offered to people while they roam in other countries.

Originality/value

For technology developers, both the key technical issues and the concerns of the consumers are highlighted. Future applications must contain reliable security and privacy protocols in their design. Moreover, the significance of the social networks is shown in the decision-making of the use of mobile tethering, especially with respect to the credit exchange.

Details

info, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Sandip Mukhopadhyay and Harry Bouwman

Because of the attention increasingly being focused on digital transformation, interest in business models of platform-enabled ecosystems is rising rapidly. Although there…

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1302

Abstract

Purpose

Because of the attention increasingly being focused on digital transformation, interest in business models of platform-enabled ecosystems is rising rapidly. Although there are different theoretical views on the role of ecosystems, a synthesis of research, with a focus on governance and orchestration in dynamic, multi-industry eco-systems, is lacking.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted by following a rigorous search protocol in the scholarly databases covering both journal articles and conference papers These papers were subsequently filtered, and finally, 48 relevant papers were selected for analysis.

Findings

The review identifies five key aspects of platform governance design that need close consideration: the meta-organisation or ecosystem design, coordination mechanisms, mechanisms for value co-creation, value appropriation mechanisms and architectural principles. To achieve balance among a set of competing demands, platform leaders need to devote adequate attention to these aspects.

Practical implications

Based on a literature review, the authors provide an overview of underlying theoretical views, research methods and key trends to develop a sound theoretical grounding for research on platform governance design. The paper also suggests research gaps in the existing literature and sets directions for researchers to strengthen the understanding of effective platform governance design. The paper also provides valuable information to managers in developing or leading a successful platform ecosystem.

Originality/value

The paper uses existing literature published in this topic and original in nature.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Soebhaash Dihal, Harry Bouwman, Mark de Reuver, Martijn Warnier and Christer Carlsson

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to explore the meaning of cloud computing for mobile communication. The paper answers the question “what is mobile cloud

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3042

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to explore the meaning of cloud computing for mobile communication. The paper answers the question “what is mobile cloud computing?” and how is it related to the generic cloud computing concept?

Design/methodology/approach

This is an explanatory conceptual paper, based on literature review and exploring potential use cases, focused on the use of mobile cloud for service, platform or infrastructure access. The authors exclude the discussion of the traditional cloud concept in back office processes of telecom operators, and service providers.

Findings

Where cloud computing is focused on pooling of resources, mobile technology is focused on pooling and sharing of resources locally enabling alternative use cases for mobile infrastructure, platforms and service delivery. The paper discusses relevant concepts and offers examples of use cases.

Research limitations/implications

The value of mobile cloud solutions is not yet explicit, but needs further attention. Research should focus on the relation between mobile cloud computing, platforms and eco systems. From a user perspective the willingness to share pooled resources needs further attention.

Practical implications

Mobile cloud computing offers the possibility that disruptive applications might impact the mobile eco system; reinforcing or weakening business models of core players like handset providers, telecom operators, and service providers.

Originality/value

A lot of attention is paid to cloud computing and to platform discussions, papers on mobile cloud are scarce. This paper offers the current state of the art and a research outlook.

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Norazah Mohd Suki

The study aims to examine structural relationships of product features, brand name, product price and social influence with demand for Smartphones among Malaysian students’.

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10077

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine structural relationships of product features, brand name, product price and social influence with demand for Smartphones among Malaysian students’.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 320 valid pre‐screened university students studying at the pubic higher learning institution in Federal Territory of Labuan, Malaysia who have experience in using and owning Smartphones, using a structured questionnaire, with closed‐ended questions, employing a convenient sampling technique, were tested against the research model using the structural equation modeling (SEM) approach via AMOS 20.0 computer program.

Findings

Empirical results via SEM divulged that brand name and social influence have an effect on the increasing demand for Smartphones among Malaysian students. The first is confirmed as the most influential factor, followed by the latter. This is according to standardised path coefficients and their statistical signicance.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes significantly to a more thorough understanding of the determinants of demand for Smartphones among Malaysian students’ by emphasizing the dimensions of product features, brand name, product price and social influence. Students’ demand for Smartphones is highly influenced by aspects of the brand name of the Smartphone itself and social influence from friends and family members.

Practical Implications

Smartphone providers, manufacturers, application developers and programmers should improve the current ability and performance of Smartphones by upgrading hardware and software driven services for better user interaction and engagement in order to be marketable and sustainable in meeting consumer unlimited needs and wants. They should also emphasize their brand name in advertising to be well positioned in consumers’ minds when making the decision to purchase and own a Smartphone. Positive viral marketing spread via social networking sites could help Smartphone providers to strengthen the competitive advantage of their product brands. The attractiveness of the message content of the advertisement on the social networking sites could improve marketing strategies of the Smartphone brand.

Originality/value

This study provides valuable insight into consumer behavior regarding Smartphones demand by examining the factors that influence students’ demand for using and owning Smartphones, which is not much covered in the literature in Malaysia context. The lessons can also be replicated in other countries for marketing Smartphones.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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