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This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/14664100010361773. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/14664100010361773. When citing the article, please cite: N. Bowler, Susanna Moss, Mark Winston, M. Coleman, (2000), “An audit of psychiatric case notes in relation to antipsychotic medication and information giving”, British Journal of Clinical Governance, Vol. 5 Iss 4 pp. 212 - 216.

Details

Clinical Performance and Quality Healthcare, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1063-0279

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Article

Mark Winston

Reference librarians interact with a broad range of customers and are expected to provide quality service to that clientele. In addition, library collections and services…

Abstract

Reference librarians interact with a broad range of customers and are expected to provide quality service to that clientele. In addition, library collections and services should reflect the community served and meet at least a portion of the information needs of that community. As the populations that reference librarians serve change and become more and more diverse, particularly in the case of those librarians serving academic communities, it is critical that the resulting library environments be conducive to the success of the populations served. As a result, librarians are compelled to become more culturally sensitive and to ensure that the library environment is open to all of those in the target population.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Mark Winston

The purpose of this paper is to address the profession's focus on diversity, including the original research, and analyze the research beyond the profession to understand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the profession's focus on diversity, including the original research, and analyze the research beyond the profession to understand better the bases for the limited progress in fulfilling diversity goals. The paper focuses on the fact that diversity has been equated with race and the potential implications of that relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

An overview and analysis of diversity research, including factors associated with the success of diversity programs, is presented, focusing on research regarding the relationship between diversity and race. The article also considers how perceptions of race and racism have been manifested across sectors and in various countries. Based upon the fact that diversity and race have been equated, the discussion focuses on the extent to which this relationship is connected to the limited progress associated with diversity goals.

Findings

Research related to race, diversity, and affirmative action indicate both the complexity of the concepts among scientists, social scientists, and members of the general public, as well as the biases reflected in the viewpoints, often manifested in public policy. The research among communication scholars also indicates a predisposition to avoiding communication about difficult topics, such as race and racism, reflective in the use of more benign terminology, such as diversity.

Practical implications

While diversity research continues to be necessary in the profession, going beyond that which documents the levels of under‐representation, there is also the need for further consideration of the applicability of research beyond the LIS profession. In this regard, the understanding of research related to diversity, race, and affirmative action, and the relationship among the three provides the basis for further research in LIS and a more informed approach in addressing diversity issues in the profession.

Originality/value

The primary focus of the discussion of the paper is that of the nature of diversity, race and racism, as defined in the context of the USA. However, research related to race, racial classifications and hierarchies, and diversity in other parts of North America, Australia, Europe, and Africa are considered to a limited extent as well.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Mark D. Winston and Susan Quinn

This paper addresses the coverage of issues related to crisis and societal change in the scholarly literature in relation to libraries, information services, and access to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper addresses the coverage of issues related to crisis and societal change in the scholarly literature in relation to libraries, information services, and access to information and the leadership role of librarians and libraries in addressing such issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an overview and analysis of the general issue of change in the literature review, as well as a discussion of war and terrorism, civil and natural disasters, social movements, medical and healthcare crises and needs, and large‐scale economic and technological shifts. The research results address the extent to which these major economic, political, technological and social changes have been addressed in four quarterly, peer‐reviewed library and information science journals over the past six years and the extent to which the focus of the published research and discussion has shifted over the past six years.

Findings

Research based on analysis of the journal literature reflects the documentation of practices and research results in library and information science. The research results indicate increased focus on war and terrorism and large‐scale economic and technological change, as related to information services, in the literature, during and after 2001, but less focus on information access, despite the impact of war and terrorism on library collections and resulting legal and policy decisions related to access to information.

Research limitations/implications

As a result of the limited focus on research and discussion of leadership in the peer‐reviewed journals included in the research study and the fact that the articles that addressed the role of libraries and librarians in addressing various aspects of crisis and change did not also identify the roles as those of leadership, there is the need for research and publication to document the examples of library leadership that may be taking place, but which are not reflected in the research literature.

Practical implications

The efforts undertaken to influence the policy‐making and legislative processes, to provide access to information, and to design and provide information resources and services have not been articulated in the literature as leadership roles, in particular. Thus, the analysis of the literature appears to indicate further opportunities for leadership at the local, national and international levels, consistent with the numerous examples reflected in the literature.

Originality/value

In general, there is limited focus on research and discussion of leadership in the scholarly journals in library and information science. This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of the major economic, political, technological and social changes internationally, over the past six years, and addresses the extent to which the efforts of librarians and libraries to address these issues have been documented in the research literature.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article

These indicate in general the need for examinees to comply with fundamental procedures on the lines indicated in Education & Training, April 1983. Specific comments for…

Abstract

These indicate in general the need for examinees to comply with fundamental procedures on the lines indicated in Education & Training, April 1983. Specific comments for individual papers are set out below.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Content available
Article

Linda Ashcroft

Abstract

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

N. Bowler, Susanna Moss, Mark Winston and M. Coleman

This paper reports upon a Welsh Office funded “clinical effectiveness” project. The project aimed to produce evidence‐based practice guidelines for depot neuroleptic…

Abstract

This paper reports upon a Welsh Office funded “clinical effectiveness” project. The project aimed to produce evidence‐based practice guidelines for depot neuroleptic medication. An audit was conducted to establish current practice regarding the provision of illness and treatment specific information to out‐patients and their informal carers. Sixty‐five patients’ case‐notes, under the care of a single community mental health team were examined for evidence of the type, nature and frequency of information given to patients receiving typical depot neuroleptic medications. Service guidelines were produced and are presented.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article

Mark Winston

This article seeks to address the need for ethical and informed leadership in professions in general and library and information science in particular, and the challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to address the need for ethical and informed leadership in professions in general and library and information science in particular, and the challenges of professional education in library and information science in providing a theoretical basis for professional work that incorporates an understanding of ethical principles.

Design/methodology/approach

The article provides an overview and analysis of ethical leadership issues in a range of international, organizational and individual circumstances. While the private and public sectors provide a frame of reference for considering library and information science education, the nature of the professional values in library and information services is also presented. In addition, the research related to limitations in ethical decision‐making ability among individuals is presented, in highlighting the need for educational approaches that support conscious consideration of biases and application of ethical principles.

Findings

There are significant challenges associated with educating future leaders about the importance of ethics, based on the competing motivations of professionals and managers, the complexity associated with ethical decision making, and the limitations of the knowledge base associated with ethical decision making. The published research suggests that a thoughtful and informed approach is needed in order to prepare graduates for their roles as ethical leaders in library and information services organizations.

Practical implications

In addition to the many incentives to make unethical choices in the face of competition and demands for performance and success, there is the need for decision makers to be conscious of the pitfalls associated with ethical decision making. Such an awareness is enhanced by educational programs that emphasize the nature of ethical principles and the importance of an informed approach to leadership and decision making.

Originality/value

This article addresses the ethical leadership challenges facing individuals and organizations in the public and private sectors, higher education and libraries and identifies the legislative, regulatory, and organizational approaches that have been undertaken to encourage ethical decision making. The challenges and responses provide a framework for considering ethical leadership and decision making in library and information services and in library and information science education.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article

Mark Winston

The academic library mission is defined based on the need to support the larger parent university mission. In the case of the urban university, which has been the focus of…

Abstract

Purpose

The academic library mission is defined based on the need to support the larger parent university mission. In the case of the urban university, which has been the focus of relatively little discussion and research in the library and information science literature, the research component of the mission potentially influences research agendas as well as the decisions of faculty who choose to teach and do research in such a setting, with a particular focus on “applied scholarship” or research that is community‐focused, considering social problems. Of the urban issues that have shaped the urban university mission, crime is also a key determinant of the resilience of urban areas. The breadth and depth of the research issues related to crime have been well‐documented. The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of the research findings, indicating the complexity of the research and findings, as well.

Design/methodology/approach

The research related to crime ranges from the basic documentation of crime statistics, to the analysis of trends in the data, to attempts to understand why factors as divergent as economic downturns, media coverage, drug use, population reductions, weather or season of the year, and sentencing guidelines impact crime rates. The research also addresses issues, such as the use of DNA and other forensic evidence in crime investigation and juror opinions and the fallibility of eyewitness accounts. The paper presents an overview and analysis of crime‐related research, reflecting the breadth of such research and examples, which indicate the fact that the research is frequently characterized by complexity, often manifested in findings that are inconclusive and conflicting, and rarely reflecting causality. The paper presents an analysis of the research related to crime, intended to be representative, not exhaustive, of a broad range of examples of findings and analyses, across a range of academic disciplines and professions, supported by academic libraries.

Findings

The analysis of research related to the causes of increases and reductions in crime, why crime rates vary by city, and a range of other related issues reflects broad interest in enhanced understanding of issues related to crime, among researchers across disciplines, public policymakers and law enforcement, as well as members of the general public. This interest is reflected, not only in the amount of published research, the publication of such research in disciplinary, scholarly sources, but also in the general interest literature, and the growth in research following increases in various types of crimes. The analysis also reflects interest in a number of specific research questions and the extent to which models, such as the broken windows theory, possibly the best known theory of this type, are effective in reducing violent crime. The results of research related to crime indicate the complexity, breadth and interdisciplinarity of the concepts studied by scientists and social scientists, as well as the complexity of research findings, as represented in inconclusive and conflicting findings and difficulty in isolating variables and representing causality.

Originality/value

The analysis of the nature, breadth, complexity, and interdisciplinarity of the research related to crime provides the basis for a more informed approach in considering the role of the urban university library, in particular, in supporting fulfillment of the larger institutional mission.

Details

New Library World, vol. 111 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article

Betty J. Turock

Diversity issues pervade a world connected by electronic advances that have closed distances and made possible millisecond communication. In the USA, and throughout the…

Abstract

Diversity issues pervade a world connected by electronic advances that have closed distances and made possible millisecond communication. In the USA, and throughout the world, the seeds of one of the major challenges for library and information science reside within these diversity issues. Even as demographic ballasts are shifting around the globe, our professional moorings remain static. Data on the student body of the American Library Association accredited master's programs in library and information science located in the USA illustrate insufficient gains to respond to the heightened diversity of the nation in the twenty‐first century. This paper sets out the development of a diverse professional workforce and diverse professional leaders within four streams of research and theory, which point the way to a model for the future. The first arises from a feminist perspective combined with the second, the historical conceptualization of leadership over time, which overlooks or obscures the contributions of minority populations. The third stream identifies factors impacting the recruitment of minority groups, taken together, are currently emerging as the majority in the USA. The fourth focuses on interdependence between educators and practitioners as a key to increasing diversity in educational programs and professional leadership. A model arising from the four streams is presented. The creation of a global program that advances interdependence and equity is outlined.

Details

New Library World, vol. 104 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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