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Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2000

Daryl M. Guffey and Mark W. McCartney

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Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-872-8

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Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2000

Abstract

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Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-872-8

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2017

Brenda Jones Harden, Brandee Feola, Colleen Morrison, Shelby Brown, Laura Jimenez Parra and Andrea Buhler Wassman

Children experience toxic stress if there is pronounced activation of their stress-response systems, in situations in which they do not have stable caregiving. Due to…

Abstract

Children experience toxic stress if there is pronounced activation of their stress-response systems, in situations in which they do not have stable caregiving. Due to their exposure to multiple poverty-related risks, African American children may be more susceptible to exposure to toxic stress. Toxic stress affects young children’s brain and neurophysiologic functioning, which leads to a wide range of deleterious health, developmental, and mental health outcomes. Given the benefits of early care and education (ECE) for African American young children, ECE may represent a compensating experience for this group of children, and promote their positive development.

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African American Children in Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-258-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Kerry Jacobs and Steve Evans

This paper aims to explore how accounting is entwined in the cultural practice of popular music. Particular attention is paid to how the accountant is constricted by…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how accounting is entwined in the cultural practice of popular music. Particular attention is paid to how the accountant is constricted by artists in art and the role(s) the accountant plays in the artistic narrative. In effect this explores the notion that there is a tension between the notion of the bourgeois world of “the accountant” and the world of “art for art's sake”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the cultural theory of Pierre Bourdieu to understand how the character of the accountant is constructed and used by the artist. Particular attention is paid in this respect to the biography and lyrics of the Beatles.

Findings

Accounting and accountants play both the hero and the villain. By rejecting the “accountant villain”, the artist identifies with and reinforces artistic purity and credibility. However, in order to achieve the economic benefits and maintain the balance between the “art” and the “money”, the economic prudence of the bourgeois accountant is required (although it might be resented).

Research limitations/implications

The analysis focuses on a relatively small range of musicians and is dominated by the biography of the Beatles. A further range of musicians and artists would extend this work. Further research could also be constructed to more fully consider the consumption, rather than just the production, of art and cultural products and performances.

Originality/value

This paper is a novel consideration of how accounting stereotypes are constructed and used in the field of artistic creation

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Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

George Stylios

Discusses the 6th ITCRR, its breadth of textile and clothing research activity, plus the encouragement given to workers in this field and its related areas. States that…

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1008

Abstract

Discusses the 6th ITCRR, its breadth of textile and clothing research activity, plus the encouragement given to workers in this field and its related areas. States that, within the newer research areas under the microscope of the community involved, technical textiles focuses on new, ‘smart’ garments and the initiatives in this field in both the UK and the international community at large. Covers this subject at length.

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International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2006

Tho Lai Mooi

Self‐efficacy has been defined as individuals’ beliefs, thoughts, and feelings about their personal capabilities that affect how they function and, which in turn influence…

Abstract

Self‐efficacy has been defined as individuals’ beliefs, thoughts, and feelings about their personal capabilities that affect how they function and, which in turn influence their performance (Bandura 1977). Self beliefs can influence behaviour choices, determine the amount of effort needed and for how long, and encourage thought patterns and emotional behaviours necessary to succeed. It is theorised that students with unrealistic expectations (especially overly optimistic expectations) may have difficulty aligning efforts with desired performance levels and, as a result, perform more poorly. In this study, selfefficacy is operationalised as the difference between actual and predicted examination performance. Prediction errors in the final examination marks (MERR) and prediction error in the overall course grade (GERR) of a second year management accounting course are used as measures of Self‐efficacy. Using regression analysis, the results indicate that the efficacy measures are significant and positively related to course performance. This suggests that students who are more conservative in their expectations of the course results perform better than those who are more optimistic. The findings also showed that student characteristics of previous academic achievements (CGPA) and hours of study per week (HRWK) explained more that 40 per cent of the variations in the self‐efficacy measures. The higher a student’s CGPA, the more conservative or cautious he is in the prediction of his final course performance. The more pessimistic a student is of his final course performance, the lower the number of hours he estimates for studying the course.

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Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2017

Mhairi Mackenzie, Annette Hastings, Breannon Babbel, Sarah Simpson and Graham Watt

This chapter addresses inequalities in the United Kingdom through the lens of health inequalities. Driven by inequalities in income and power, health inequalities…

Abstract

This chapter addresses inequalities in the United Kingdom through the lens of health inequalities. Driven by inequalities in income and power, health inequalities represent a microcosm of wider debates on inequalities. They also play a role as the more politically unacceptable face of inequalities – where other types of inequality are more blatantly argued as collateral damage of advanced neoliberalism including ‘inevitable’ austerity measures, politicians are more squeamish about discussing health inequalities in these terms.

The chapter starts by depicting health inequalities in Scotland and summarises health policy analyses of the causes of, and solutions to, health inequalities. It then describes the concept of ‘proportionate’ universalism’ and sets this within the context of debates around universal versus targeted welfare provision in times of fiscal austerity.

It then turns to a small empirical case-study which investigates these tensions within the Scottish National Health Service. The study asks those operating at policy and practice levels: how is proportionate universalism understood; and, is it a threat or ballast to universal welfare provision?

Findings are discussed within the political context of welfare retrenchment, and in terms of meso- and micro-practices. We conclude that there are three levels at which proportionate universalism needs to be critiqued as a means of mitigating the impacts of inequalities in the social determinants of health. These are within the political arenas, at a policy and planning level and at the practice level where individual practitioners are enabled or not to practice in ways that might mitigate existing inequalities.

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Inequalities in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-479-8

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Will Miller and Kyle Gunnels

Civic engagement means more than formal participation in the political process. Students can experience civic life across campus in ways that may not jump off the page as…

Abstract

Civic engagement means more than formal participation in the political process. Students can experience civic life across campus in ways that may not jump off the page as being relevant on first reading. Whether in the classroom through intentionally designed curricular experiences or through participating in a student organization focused on civic engagement, higher education should be helping develop students as active, participatory citizens. This chapter aims to provide the first look at how students across the United States are organizing on college campuses to participate in the political process.

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Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Jessica Meyer

The history of the memory and commemoration of the First World War in British culture has long been the subject of academic debate. In particular, numerous studies have…

Abstract

The history of the memory and commemoration of the First World War in British culture has long been the subject of academic debate. In particular, numerous studies have explored the significance of place, both local and national, to the creation and continuity of commemorative practices across the past 100 years. The current years of the centenary provide a particularly useful point of reference for exploring the development of cultural memory of the First World War in Britain, while the village of Ambridge forms a unique case study of local and national commemorative practices.

This chapter examines two forms of commemoration represented in The Archers, the episodic marking of Remembrance Sunday across a 30-year period from 1996 to the present, and the community’s engagement with national commemorative events in the centenary year 2014. It locates both these forms of commemoration in Nora’s (1996) concept of lieux de memoire, the key symbolic elements of community memorial heritage, and Hobsbawm’s (1983) definitions of invented traditions as those which are imposed upon communities rather than emerging organically from them. In doing so it argues that place functions as the key element of Ambridge’s role as a lieu de memoire of the war, in contrast to people whose stories appear as invented traditions, particularly in 2014. It concludes that the programme ultimately maintains its ability to function as a lieu de memoire across the period, not only for the community of Ambridge, but also for the wider national community of Archers listeners.

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Custard, Culverts and Cake
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-285-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Mark J. Robinson, David W. Armitage and John P. Oakley

Degradation of images due to atmospheric scattering is a phenomenon that causes problems in a number of imaging applications. By using knowledge of the scene geometry and…

Abstract

Degradation of images due to atmospheric scattering is a phenomenon that causes problems in a number of imaging applications. By using knowledge of the scene geometry and a physical model of scattering, it is possible to apply a correction to remove the systematic effects of scattering. This paper describes a system that can perform atmospheric correction of colour PAL video in real time. Examples of the processed output are given for a static and an aircraft‐mounted camera, both in hazy conditions.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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