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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

James D. Bramble, Mark V. Siracuse, Kimberly A. Galt, Ann M. Rule, Bartholomew E. Clark and Karen A. Paschal

Results of a previous study showed that use of health information technology (HIT) significantly reduced potential medication prescribing errors. However, the results also…

Abstract

Results of a previous study showed that use of health information technology (HIT) significantly reduced potential medication prescribing errors. However, the results also revealed a less than 100% rate of HIT adoption by primary care physicians. The current study reports on personal interviews with participating physicians that explored the barriers they faced when attempting to fully adopt a particular HIT. Content analysis of qualitative interviews revealed three barrier themes: time, technology, and environment. Interviews also revealed two other areas of concern; specifically, the compatibility of the HIT with the physician's patient mix and the physician's own attitude toward the use of HIT. A theoretical model of technology acceptance and use is used to discuss and further explain the data derived from the physician interviews. With a better understanding of these issues, health care administrators can develop successful strategies for adoption of HIT across their health care organizations.

Details

Patient Safety and Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-955-5

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Kimberly A. Galt, Karen A. Paschal, Amy Abbott, Andjela Drincic, Mark V. Siracuse, James D. Bramble and Ann M. Rule

This mixed methods multiple case study examines the knowledge, understanding, and awareness of 25 health board/facility oversight managers and 20 health professional…

Abstract

This mixed methods multiple case study examines the knowledge, understanding, and awareness of 25 health board/facility oversight managers and 20 health professional association directors about privacy and security issues important to achieving health information exchange (HIE) in the state of Nebraska. Within case analyses revealed that health board/facility oversight managers were unaware of key elements of the federal agenda; their concerns about privacy encompassed broad definitions both of what constituted a “health record” and “regulations centeredness.” Alternatively, health professional association leaders were keenly aware of national initiatives. Despite concerns about HIE, they supported information exchange believing that patient care quality and safety would improve. Cross-case analyses revealed a perceptual disconnect between board/facility oversight managers and professional association leaders; however, both favored HIE. Understanding state-level stakeholder perceptions helps us further understand our progress toward achieving the national health information interoperability goal. There is an ongoing need to assure adequate patient privacy protection. Licensure and facility boards at the state level are likely to have a major role in the assurance of patient protections through facility oversight and provider behavior. The need for these boards to take an active role in oversight of patient rights and protections is imminent. Similarly, professional associations are the major vehicles for post-graduate education of practicing health professionals. Their engagement is essential to maintaining health professions knowledge. States will need to understand and engage both of these key stakeholders to make substantial progress in moving the HIE agenda forward.

Details

Patient Safety and Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-955-5

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Abstract

Details

Patient Safety and Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-955-5

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