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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Katherine Tyler, Mark Patton, Marco Mongiello and Derek Meyer

The purpose of this article is to review the emerging literature of services business markets (SBMs) from 1974 to 2007 and analyse main themes that indicate the…

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3017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to review the emerging literature of services business markets (SBMs) from 1974 to 2007 and analyse main themes that indicate the development of the literature. It also aims to provide an introduction to the special issue on services business‐to‐business markets by examining the context.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature of SBMs from 1974 through 2007 was searched in relevant databases. The articles were analysed using Glaser's grounded theory. The constant comparison method was used with in vivo coding to reveal themes in the literature. These themes were then analysed contextually.

Findings

The literature revealed seven themes which followed a trajectory from implicit to explicit consideration of SBMs, as well as to multi‐ and cross‐disciplinary focus with integration of variables from consumer services marketing. The landscape for SBMs has become blurred due to deregulation, globalisation and information technology, particularly the internet and e‐commerce. The complexity and diversity of the literature reflects this new, blurred reality.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to indicative literature about SBMs as an introduction to the special issue on services business‐to‐business markets. The literature would benefit from a full critical review and research agenda.

Practical implications

The integration of theories coupled with the focus on specific service sectors and contexts, provide useful, applicable and transferable concepts which may be helpful to managers who are working in new contexts.

Originality/value

This article surveys the emergence of the literature on SBMs and defines its trajectory, themes and characteristics. It provides a useful background for academics and practitioners who would find a guide to the fissiparous literature on SBMs useful.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Jiseul Kim and Carol Ebdon

GASB Statement No. 34 required state and local governments to report information regarding general infrastructure in financial statements, to improve understanding of the…

Abstract

GASB Statement No. 34 required state and local governments to report information regarding general infrastructure in financial statements, to improve understanding of the organization's investments in capital assets. Some proponents suggested that this information would affect management practices and potentially resource allocation decisions, but initial survey data found limited evidence of effects. We use dynamic panel analysis covering 47 states from 1995 to 2009 to explore whether implementation of GASB 34 affected state highway capital and maintenance spending. We find evidence of increased capital spending, but no statistically significant change in maintenance expenditures. The choice of reporting method was not found to affect spending outcomes.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Katherine Tyler and Edmund Stanley

The purpose of this article is to investigate trust in financial services business markets.

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5834

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate trust in financial services business markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The article provides qualitative research, based on 147 in‐depth interviews with corporate bankers and their clients.

Findings

The article finds that perceptions of trust and the operationalisation of trust were asymmetrical across the dyads and segments. Small companies were more trusting than large corporates. Bankers used calculative and operational trust and were cynical about their counterparts' trustworthiness. Bankers were quick to eliminate clients from their portfolio who did not, in their view, provide full disclosure of pertinent facts.

Research limitations/implications

There may be different findings for other cultural contexts and financial service industries. The article encourages research in other contexts and industries and provides a platform to encourage this.

Practical implications

The article provides guidelines for bankers and their clients to understand the importance of trust in their relationships, and to understand how it is operationalised differently by the counterparts.

Originality/value

There are few studies of trust in either services business markets, or financial services business markets. Therefore, this article makes a valuable contribution. It also provides a critical review and integrates the literature on trust as applied to financial services business markets.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

B. Ramaseshan and Mark A. Patton

Given the paucity of studies investigating international channel choiceamong small business exporters, examines the influence of selectedvariables on international channel…

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4608

Abstract

Given the paucity of studies investigating international channel choice among small business exporters, examines the influence of selected variables on international channel choice decisions of small business exporters in one specific industry. Results of the analysis using the logistic multiple regression procedure show that three factors significantly distinguish small business exporters using independent channels from those using integrated channels. These factors are: first, company′s exports as a percentage of the total sales volume, second, international family heritage of the major export decision makers in the company, and third, importance of service requirements. The results indicate that firms with higher exports (as a percentage of the total sales volume) and stronger international family heritage tend to use independent channels, while firms with products for which the importance of service requirements is considered to be high tend to use integrated channels. Discusses the implications for the management of small business exports.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Carolin Plewa and Pascale Quester

The purpose of the paper is to analyse empirically research‐oriented university‐industry relationships based on the incorporation of relationship marketing (RM) and…

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2780

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to analyse empirically research‐oriented university‐industry relationships based on the incorporation of relationship marketing (RM) and technology transfer theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an extensive literature review and initial qualitative research, a conceptual model is presented and tested using structural equation modelling methods. Analysis was conducted, and is reported, in three steps, including path analysis and hypothesis testing, model re‐specification and a multi‐group analysis comparing university and industry respondents.

Findings

Trust, commitment and integration were found to positively influence satisfaction and were confirmed as key drivers of successful university‐industry relationships. While trust was the strongest driver of satisfaction, commitment emerged as the strongest predictor of intention to renew. The results also confirmed the proposed interrelationships between the relationship characteristics. Organisational compatibility emerged as positively influencing all relationship characteristics, indicating its relevance for university‐industry relationships and suggesting its potential importance for other relationships crossing essentially different organisational environments. Surprisingly, only a weak influence of staff personal experience on commitment was found.

Research limitations/implications

The results are limited to Australian relationships and by their cross‐disciplinary nature. Furthermore, a potential bias towards positive relationships might exist in the data.

Originality/value

The primary contribution of this paper lies in the development of a foundation for research in a new services business context by combining the established theory of RM with the emerging area of technology transfer. Building a thorough empirical basis for future research, the researchers anticipate the development of a comprehensive university‐industry relationship research stream.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Mika Hyötyläinen and Kristian Möller

Business services have an important role in the development of global knowledge‐base economy. This is particularly clear in the field of ICT services where business…

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3623

Abstract

Purpose

Business services have an important role in the development of global knowledge‐base economy. This is particularly clear in the field of ICT services where business customers are requiring an increasing amount of complex services in order to support their utilization of advanced ERP, SCM and CRM solutions for boosting their business processes and competitive advantage. The complexity of these services and customers' requests for special adaptations form a critical challenge for service providers. This paper seeks to develop solutions for managing this complexity.

Design/methodology/approach

Three service design and development methods – service industrialization, tangibilization, and service blueprinting – are introduced and then analyzed as to how they can be utilized as an integrated system to reduce the complexity of ICT services. This is carried out through an action research‐based case study of an ICT service provider.

Findings

The results include a service architecture framework, which can be used for creating a modularized offering and implementation system for complex business services. It reduces the complexity of services while allowing their customer specific adaptation.

Practical implications

Key aspects are the identification of service modules and interfaces in a multi‐actor service offering setting and the providing of adequate resources for the design phase of the customized service project. This is essential in order to be able to simultaneously respond to customer specific needs and to reduce the number of existing technologies and overlapping functionalities, seemingly contra dictionary aims.

Originality/value

Findings of the paper offer significant theoretical and managerial implications for the design and production of complex business services.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Simona Stan, Kenneth R. Evans, Charles M. Wood and Jeffrey L. Stinson

The purpose of this article is to explore the possible negative asymmetric effects in the impact of service quality on the satisfaction and retention of different customer…

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2449

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the possible negative asymmetric effects in the impact of service quality on the satisfaction and retention of different customer segments in a professional business services context. Negative asymmetry means that a lower than average service quality evaluation has a stronger effect on customer satisfaction and retention than a higher than average evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

The article provides a survey of 124 business customers of a Midwestern radio advertising services provider, preceded by nine in‐depth interviews with account reps of the advertising firm and two focus groups with business customers.

Findings

Along the service quality dimensions – customer satisfaction – retention chain, there are significant negative asymmetric effects and the mediating role of satisfaction varies widely. There are important differences across customer groups: service outcomes are most important determinants of customer satisfaction for large and relatively newer accounts; functional quality dimensions (empathy) are most important factors for small and relatively mature accounts.

Research limitations/implications

Surveying customers of one organization in one industry reduces the generalizability of the findings. The study employed only two segmentation variables, while many other variables could be investigated. The focus is on the asymmetric effects of service quality; other factors, such as costs, were not considered.

Practical implications

Managers should invest resources in improving low performance in the service quality dimensions with strongest impact on customer satisfaction and highest negative asymmetry. The identified segment differences suggest the need to achieve strong results for large accounts and relatively new accounts. The customer relationship is most important for small accounts and relatively mature accounts. Maintaining service reliability is critical for small and new account retention.

Originality/value

This study is a first effort to explore the differences in effects across service quality dimensions and customer segments in a professional business service context. The findings indicate that aggregating customers and the service quality measurement can offer misleading information to managers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Arun Sharma

The purpose of the paper is to examine shifts in sales organizations utilized to sell services to business‐to‐business customers. The paper also examines the changes…

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2822

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine shifts in sales organizations utilized to sell services to business‐to‐business customers. The paper also examines the changes expected in personal selling and sales management.

Design/methodology/approach

Extant academic literature and emerging practices are examined to determine trends.

Findings

The paper suggests that the traditional service‐focused sales organization is evolving in two distinct directions. First, enhanced sales automation is resulting in a reduction in salespeople's contact with customers. Second, an enhancement in the level of customer contact is leading to a growth of customer‐focused sales organizations and an increase in global account management teams.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research is needed in this area.

Practical implications

Changes are required in the manner in which personal selling and sales management is practiced in organizations. Firms need to make these changes or their sales forces will be less efficient and less effective.

Originality/value

This important area is very infrequently examined in literature. This is the first attempt to examine this area.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Graham Whittaker, Lesley Ledden and Stavros P. Kalafatis

The objectives of this paper are twofold: to add to the debate regarding conceptualisation and operationalisation of value within a professional service domain, and to…

Downloads
4290

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this paper are twofold: to add to the debate regarding conceptualisation and operationalisation of value within a professional service domain, and to contribute to the relatively sparse literature dealing with the functional relationship between determinants and outcomes of value with specific emphasis on the value to satisfaction and intention to re‐purchase relationship in professional services.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretically grounded model has been developed that comprises three antecedents of value (conceptualised as a higher order construct of six dimensions) and satisfaction both of which impact on intention. The model has been tested, using partial least squares, on 78 responses obtained through an email survey carried out amongst executives of the top 300 UK‐based companies listed in the Times 1,000.

Findings

The results indicate that although perceived value is a multi‐dimensional construct treating value as a unified construct may lead to confounding effects. Although further research is needed it is suggested that different dimensions of value act at different levels of the value hierarchy and differentially reflect process and outcome value creation forces in professional services.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the debate surrounding conceptualisations of the value construct by offering empirical support as to its formative nature. Furthermore, this is the first attempt to examine differences in the nomological relationships of value when it is treated as a single higher order construct and when the higher order structure of value is relaxed allowing its dimensions to directly interact with antecedents and consequences.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Judy Zolkiewski, Barbara Lewis, Fang Yuan and Jing Yuan

The purpose of this paper is to develop a deeper understanding of customer service/service quality in business‐to‐business contexts.

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4352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a deeper understanding of customer service/service quality in business‐to‐business contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth case study was used to discover the perceptions of both key individuals in the supplying company and key customers.

Findings

The paper shows that that customer service/service quality in a business‐to‐business context is a complex and multifaceted issue, the different parties in a relationship have differing perceptions of what constitutes service quality and that actors from the wider network can have an impact on perceptions of service quality.

Research limitations/implications

This work is tentative in nature so it is not possible to generalise the findings to a wider context. However, it suggests that this area needs much more detailed and in‐depth investigation.

Practical implications

Managers need to be aware of the complexity of customers' service quality perceptions in a business‐to‐business context. They must consider dynamics, actions of other actors and how best to demonstrate their expertise and experience.

Originality/value

The findings of this research, although only exploratory, are significant because they are one of the few pieces of research into business‐to‐business service quality in which perceptions of quality from both sides of the dyad are collected and analysed.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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