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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2019

Adam Hehr and Mark Norfolk

This paper aims to comprehensively review ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) process history, technology advancements, application areas and research areas. UAM, a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to comprehensively review ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) process history, technology advancements, application areas and research areas. UAM, a hybrid 3D metal printing technology, uses ultrasonic energy to produce metallurgical bonds between layers of metal foils near room temperature. No melting occurs in the process – it is a solid-state 3D metal printing technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is formatted chronologically to help readers better distinguish advancements and changes in the UAM process through the years. Contributions and advancements are summarized by academic or research institution following this chronological format.

Findings

This paper summarizes key physics of the process, characterization methods, mechanical properties, past and active research areas, process limitations and application areas.

Originality/value

This paper reviews the UAM process for the first time.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Xiao-Hua He, Hui-Ji Shi and Mark Norfolk

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of key parameters on the bond strength and failure modes of laminated structures made of different aluminum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of key parameters on the bond strength and failure modes of laminated structures made of different aluminum alloys (i.e. Al 2024 and Al 7075) via the ultrasonic consolidation (UC) process.

Design/methodology/approach

The UC is used to fabricate laminated structures with various parameters. The push-pin tests were performed on the specimens of different materials and parameters, and the force and displacement were recorded during the tests. The peak punch force was used to represent the bond quality of the laminated structure, and the curves of force versus displacement were used to study the failure modes of the structures.

Findings

It is found that the lower normal force, the larger vibration amplitude and the lower travel speed can result in stronger bonding. Three different failure modes are observed in the tests, due to the different relations between the toughness of interface and raw materials. The process parameters have influence on the interface toughness of a laminated structure, which further leads to different failure modes.

Originality/value

The overall mechanical properties of a laminated structure highly depend on the bond quality between laminated layers. The push-pin test can easily and effectively evaluate the bond quality of the laminated structure. This paper not only focuses on the bond strength evaluation, but also analyzes the different failure modes of laminated structures made of different aluminum alloys, which can give an opportunity to optimize the parameters for different materials.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Lyn Skipper and Kirsty Page

The purpose of this paper is to describe Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust's journey of developing more recovery-focused services from two perspectives: that of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust's journey of developing more recovery-focused services from two perspectives: that of the Trust project lead for recovery and that of a Recovery College Student and Peer Support Worker.

Design/methodology/approach

First person, narrative account from the Trust project lead for recovery and that of a Recovery College Student and Peer Support Worker.

Findings

Reflective account describing process and progress made towards establishing a Recovery College and Peer Support Worker Posts in Clinical Teams.

Originality/value

An original viewpoint on the process of developing more recovery-focused services.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Song Zhang, Dalong Yi, Hui Zhang, Lili Zheng, Yuduo Zhang, Zhigang Yang and Mark Norfolk

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key parameters that control the bonding formation of foils by the ultrasonic consolidation (UC) process and to build the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key parameters that control the bonding formation of foils by the ultrasonic consolidation (UC) process and to build the correlations among process operating conditions and key control parameters through the concept of “process map”.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of “process map” is proposed based on the diffusion bonding mechanism for the UC process, and numerical simulations have been applied to the UC process to predict peak temperature and plastic strain at the contact interface by considering a wide range of process operating conditions.

Findings

This map reveals that the formation of bonding among foils by the UC process requires a good match between temperature and plastic deformation at the contact interface. This limits the process operating window to a narrow region in the strain – temperature coordinate system.

Originality/value

This work has identified the underlying mechanism for bonding formation and the key control parameters of the UC process. The concept of “process map” for the UC process was developed, which allows the process optimization through two critical process control parameters of temperature and plastic strain at the contact interface instead of five operating conditions.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Helen Tucker, Gita Prasad and Mark Burgis

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk to improve the health and welfare of young people. Local practitioners in Thetford want to address teenage…

532

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk to improve the health and welfare of young people. Local practitioners in Thetford want to address teenage pregnancy rates as a priority issue for their community; they have volunteered to be part of a national pilot to test integrated working in a service that involves many agencies and services.

Design/methodology/approach

This health promotion service was a particular challenge for integration as it involved building partnerships between children's and adults’ services, health and social care, education and care services, and voluntary and statutory services. The service also covered the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. A local core group, chaired by a GP, planned four phases of work: design, information gathering, service redesign and evaluation. This paper sets out an analysis of progress and achievements.

Findings

The group recognised the multiple factors affecting young people and their lives and lifestyles in this area of social deprivation and the benefits of partnership working. Improvements to date include better coordination, improved access to services and an enhancement of services.

Research limitations/implications

The impact will not be measurable within the timescale of the pilot project in respect of reducing pregnancy rates; the work is ongoing.

Practical implications

Implications of the study include how partnership working can lead to targeting resources and to improving access to contraception and services.

Originality/value

This study is a local initiative within the national programme for integrating care, demonstrating the benefits of working together to target resources and working in a more coordinated way.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Helen Tucker and Mark Burgis

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk, UK, to engage patients and staff to develop and improve services by stimulating improvements in integrated…

159

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk, UK, to engage patients and staff to develop and improve services by stimulating improvements in integrated working. The two year programme focused on making specific improvements that patients said they wanted to see by working with staff who volunteered to take part in the programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The “Integrating Care in Norfolk” pilot (ICN) was one of 16 national pilots. GPs from 32 practices worked with local community staff to redesign services to meet “patient pledges”. The impact of changes on patients, staff and services were evaluated locally using questionnaires and by analysing data combined in a performance dashboard. The ICN was subject to both national and local evaluations, which provided a basis for comparison.

Findings

The local evaluation showed that progress had been made towards meeting objectives, including patients and staff satisfaction and reducing unplanned admissions. GPs recorded improvements to joint working, and all staff concerned chose to continue the project beyond the pilot period.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the local evaluation contrasted with those of the national evaluation. The Norfolk study demonstrated the positive impact of integrating care on patients, staff and services. The national study concluded that there were minimal or negative impacts of integrating care, although the study amalgamated all 16 pilots, with very different clients, services and objectives.

Originality/value

The ICN was novel in the way that patients and staff were engaged. Patients were invited to set an agenda for change, and provided a mandate to staff from each organisation to redesign their services. This approach may provide a solution to sustainable integrated working. The ICN was evaluated locally as well as nationally as part of the DH ICP programme, enabling respective findings to be compared and validated.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Maren Maal and Mark Wilson-North

The use of social media in crisis communication is growing and spreading in an instantaneous speed. The social media technology enables immediate information sharing…

1036

Abstract

Purpose

The use of social media in crisis communication is growing and spreading in an instantaneous speed. The social media technology enables immediate information sharing reaching millions of users on various social media platforms. This paper has gathered lessons learnt from the experiences of the Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service in the UK, the Oslo Police Operation Center in Norway, and from an extensive literature review on social media and crisis communication. This empirical and theoretical information was the basis of the 18 guidelines or “do’s” and “don’ts” on how to use social media in crisis communication. The purpose of this paper was to gather best practices that can help crisis managers when attempting to use social media as a crisis communication tool.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper had two cases with semi-structured interviews with representatives from two crisis management organizations (Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service in the UK dealing with safety and Oslo Police Operation Center in Norwa dealing with security). The empirical data were complemented by documentary analysis of the most up-to-date articles on social media in crisis communication.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about how to use social media as a crisis communication tool. The two case studies provide different ways to use social media (one-way communication tool and as a two-way information share). This empirical and theoretical information was the basis of the 18 guidelines or “do’s” and “don’ts” on how to use social media in crisis communication. The “do’s” and “don’ts” are best practices that can help crisis managers when attempting to use social media as a crisis communication tool. Some of the main “do’s” include building a relationship with the public prior to a crisis; being courteous, honest and transparent; being factual, accurate and credible; being timely in your messages during a crisis, etc. Some of the main “don’ts” include do not speculate; do not post personal opinions; do not post anything that could bring the organization into disrepute etc.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach with two case studies complemented by a literature review, the research results may lack generalizability. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the guidelines provided and to further find other case studies.

Practical implications

The guidelines including 18 “do’s” and “don’ts” are best practices that can help crisis managers when attempting to use social media as a crisis communication tool.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to study how social media technology can play a major role in the response efforts of the crisis management community during a crisis. It also reveals the potential of using social media as an “information harvesting” tool and a tool for “rumor management”.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Mark Hardiman, Corrina Willmoth and James J. Walsh

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of compassion-focussed therapy (CFT) on anxiety in a small sample of adults with intellectual disability.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of compassion-focussed therapy (CFT) on anxiety in a small sample of adults with intellectual disability.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods design was employed. Participants (n=3) completed questionnaire measures of anxiety and self-compassion on three occasions: pre-intervention, post-intervention and, at three months follow-up. Post-intervention, they also took part in recorded interviews that were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Findings were then synthesised to develop a comprehensive understanding of their overall experience.

Findings

Final data synthesis revealed five themes: participant anxiety decreased (reliable for all participants); the faulty self; improved positive compassionate attitudes; increased sense of common humanity; and mindful distraction techniques.

Research limitations/implications

This research paper offers in-depth analysis of three participants’ experiences rather than reporting in less detail about a larger number of participants. The self-compassion scale required considerable support and reasonable adaptation to be used with these clients.

Originality/value

Only two other studies have explored the use of CFT with people with intellectual disabilities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Broadlands and the New Rurality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-581-8

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Regi Alexander, Peter E. Langdon, Verity Chester, Magali Barnoux, Ignatius Gunaratna and Sudeep Hoare

Individuals with diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) within criminal justice settings are a highly heterogeneous group. Although studies have examined differences…

1001

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals with diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) within criminal justice settings are a highly heterogeneous group. Although studies have examined differences between those with and without ASD in such settings, there has been no examination of differences within the ASD group. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the findings of a service evaluation project, this paper introduces a typology of ASD within forensic mental health and intellectual disability settings.

Findings

The eight subtypes that are described draw on clinical variables including psychopathy, psychosis and intensity/frequency of problem behaviours that co-occur with the ASD. The initial assessment of inter-rater reliability on the current version of the typology revealed excellent agreement, multirater Kfree =0.90.

Practical implications

The proposed typology could improve understanding of the relationship between ASD and forensic risk, identify the most appropriate interventions and provide prognostic information about length of stay. Further research to refine and validate the typology is ongoing.

Originality/value

This paper introduces a novel, typology-based approach which aims to better serve people with ASD within criminal justice settings.

1 – 10 of 872