Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Fariba Darabi, Mark N.K. Saunders and Murray Clark

The purpose of this study is to explore trust initiation and development in collaborations between universities and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore trust initiation and development in collaborations between universities and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the implications for enabling engaged scholarship (ES).

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a qualitative inductive approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive maximum variation sample comprising 14 SMEs and 12 university stakeholders.

Findings

The authors highlight the role of calculus-based trust in the initiation of collaborations emphasising the key roles of networking and referrals. As collaborations develop, reciprocal insights regarding stakeholders’ competencies and integrity and the development of knowledge-based trust can support engagement, in particular, knowledge application. Although relationships have a common sense of purpose, a fully engaged campus remains absent.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on a collaborative research between eight SMEs and one university business school and does not reflect ES fully as conceptualised. It provides few insights into the role of trust (or distrust) in such collaborations where things go wrong.

Practical implications

Universities looking to enable ES collaborations with SMEs need to develop and enact strategies which support ongoing engagement and enable identification-based trust (IBT). Recommendations for universities and human resource development regarding interventions to support trust initiation and development to enable knowledge application ES are outlined and suggestions are offered for future research.

Social implications

University strategies to support the development of trust and, in particular, IBT are likely to benefit longer-term relationships and the development of ES between SMEs and universities.

Originality/value

Little research has been undertaken on trust initiation and development between academic and SME stakeholders or the associated implications for ES.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Mark N.K. Saunders

In recent years separate bodies of literature on vacancynotification and employee mobility have evolved for Migration and HumanResource Management specialisms. Whilst the…

Abstract

In recent years separate bodies of literature on vacancy notification and employee mobility have evolved for Migration and Human Resource Management specialisms. Whilst the foci of these investigations have had much in common, examination of the literature suggests that many authors appear to have limited knowledge of the work undertaken outside their specialism. Concentrates on those two aspects of the recruitment process where integration of the literature is likely to be of most benefit: vacancy notification and subsequent employee mobility. Compares and contrasts the specialisms′ approaches to examining the recruitment process and highlights a series of issues where knowledge and understanding of how these aspects of the labour market operate is limited. These include the use of information channels, the impact of labour market factors on employee mobility and the ability of incentives to overcome employee inertia.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Mark N.K. Saunders and Susan M. Davis

Discusses the use of criteria in assessment of undergraduate dissertations. Illustrates how criteria can integrate both analytical and global quality measures of students…

Downloads
2115

Abstract

Discusses the use of criteria in assessment of undergraduate dissertations. Illustrates how criteria can integrate both analytical and global quality measures of students’ work. Drawing from an analysis of assessments of an undergraduate dissertation argues that criteria need to be debated periodically if consistency is to be maintained. Highlights the importance of clear assessment procedures and emphasises that these procedures need not constrain lecturers. Concludes with discussion of implications for good practice in assessment. Appendices provide an example of an assessment procedure and criteria.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Mark N.K. Saunders, David E. Gray and Harshita Goregaokar

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on innovation and entrepreneurial learning by exploring how SMEs learn and innovate, how they use both formal…

Downloads
3759

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on innovation and entrepreneurial learning by exploring how SMEs learn and innovate, how they use both formal and informal learning and in particular the role of networks and crisis events within their learning experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed method study, comprising 13 focus groups, over 1,000 questionnaire responses from SME managers, and 20 case studies derived from semi-structured interviews.

Findings

SMEs have a strong commitment to learning, and a shared vision. Much of this learning is informal through network events, mentoring or coaching. SMEs that are innovative are significantly more committed to learning than those which are less innovative, seeing employee learning as an investment. Innovative SMEs are more likely to have a shared vision, be open-minded and to learn from crises, being able to reflect on their experiences.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for further process driven qualitative research to understand the interrelationship between, particularly informal, learning, crisis events and SME innovation.

Practical implications

SME owners need opportunities and time for reflection as a means of stimulating personal learning – particularly the opportunity to learn from crisis events. Access to mentors (often outside the business) can be important here, as are informal networks.

Originality/value

This is one of the first mixed method large scale studies to explore the relationship between SME innovation and learning, highlighting the importance of informal learning to innovation and the need for SME leaders to foster this learning as part of a shared organisational vision.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Mark N.K. Saunders

Downloads
2223

Abstract

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Catherine L. Wang, Thor Indridason and Mark N.K. Saunders

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the “transfer” process on relationships between employees' perceived organisational support and affective and…

Downloads
2770

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of the “transfer” process on relationships between employees' perceived organisational support and affective and continuance commitment within the context of the move to a new employment relationship as part of a public private partnership.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight semi‐structured interviews informed the design of a questionnaire, which was distributed to facilities management employees of a UK NHS hospital who had been seconded to a private‐sector management company. This resulted in 101 effective responses (33 per cent).

Findings

In new forms of employment relationship, employees' perceptions of the “transfer” process influence significantly their perceptions of the management company and their commitment to it. Positively perceived organisational support from the management company significantly increases affective and continuance commitment to the management company, particularly amongst those who feel positive about the transfer process.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses upon employee commitment to the management company. Further research is proposed to investigate different foci of commitment as well as the influence of the psychological contract.

Practical implications

The effect of fairness in the “transfer” process is far reaching, lasting beyond the initial transfer. Both parties should work together to enable a smooth employee “transfer” process, supervisors particularly having a strong influence on employees' attitudes and behaviour.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research regarding the antecedents and consequences of commitment of employees, who are managed by one but employed by a different organisation. This study begins to address this gap.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Adrian Thornhill and Mark N.K. Saunders

Review paper which draws together the various theoretical and disciplinary strands used in the literature to evaluate downsizing and redundancy. Defines downsizing and…

Downloads
19356

Abstract

Review paper which draws together the various theoretical and disciplinary strands used in the literature to evaluate downsizing and redundancy. Defines downsizing and redundancy within the organisational context. Explores complexity of the relationships with performance and effectiveness at both organisation and sub‐organisation levels. Evaluates downsizing strategies and implementation methods that organisations may use. Utilises the individual perspective to examine and discuss the consequences of downsizing relative to survivors. Considers the implications of this for managers. Relates theories of equity, organisational justice, job insecurity, job redesign and organisational stress to approaches which may mitigate negative responses to downsizing that impact on organisations’ performance and effectiveness.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Mark N.K. Saunders, Denise Skinner and Richard Beresford

To explore potential mismatches between stakeholders' perceptions and expectations of key and technical skills needed for an advanced modern apprentice within the UK.

Downloads
2278

Abstract

Purpose

To explore potential mismatches between stakeholders' perceptions and expectations of key and technical skills needed for an advanced modern apprentice within the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from the automotive sector, the template process is used to establish lecturer, student and employee stakeholder group's expectations of a person taking up employment alongside an advanced modern apprenticeship or as an advanced modern apprentice. Perceptions of the extent to which expectations are met and their relative importance are assessed.

Findings

All stakeholders acknowledge that a skills gap exists across key and technical skills. However, whilst students focus on technical skills, lecturers and employees place greatest emphasis on key skills and their ability to transfer them.

Research limitations/implications

Although this research is based on the UK automotive sector, the findings emphasise the importance of key skills and understanding as part of students' learning. Research is needed to establish why students appear to undervalue these and establish whether similar patterns exist in other sectors.

Practical implications

The voluntarist approach to UK vocational education and training has, when combined with the need for further education colleges to be economically viable, resulted in courses that appear attractive but do not always meet the automotive sector's needs. Research is needed to establish whether this is occurring across other sectors.

Originality/value

This template process offers a new technique to explore stakeholders' perceptions and expectations. The findings provide new insights into the mismatches between expectations of the stakeholders in vocational education and training.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Mark N.K. Saunders and Adrian Thornhill

To explore the implications for all employees' psychological contracts of a forced change from permanent to temporary employment status for some employees within an organisation.

Downloads
6559

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the implications for all employees' psychological contracts of a forced change from permanent to temporary employment status for some employees within an organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 30 employees, stratified by employment status was selected. Each employee undertook a structured card sort of possible emotional responses to change followed by an in‐depth interview to explore and explain their categorisation of these responses.

Findings

The nature of psychological contracts and organisational attachments for both permanent employees and forced temporary workers is complex. Permanent employees generally continue to exhibit relational forms of attachment to the organisation. These, they believe, are reciprocated by the organisation. Reactions from forced temporary workers are more varied. After a period of denial, some develop a more calculative approach to their interactions. Others maintain aspects of their previously developed relational attachments. Only some temporary workers appear to recognise that their future direction is no longer a concern of the organisation.

Research limitations/implications

Although only based upon one organisation, the findings suggest that the process of psychological contract adjustment is likely to emerge through gradual re‐interpretation, rather than through re‐negotiation.

Practical implications

Management actions need to be recognised as important in re‐defining the nature of psychological contracts. The transitional nature of this process may be prolonged where management imposes transactional contracts and where communication and negotiation to create clear expectations is lacking.

Originality/value

The findings provide new insights into the implications of forcing employees from permanent to temporary contracts for their, and remaining permanent employees', psychological contracts.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2012

Catherine L. Wang and Mark N.K. Saunders

Purpose – To reflect on reasons for refusal in cross-cultural telephone surveys and address ways of reducing non-response from Chinese managers.Approach – We first propose…

Abstract

Purpose – To reflect on reasons for refusal in cross-cultural telephone surveys and address ways of reducing non-response from Chinese managers.

Approach – We first propose a conceptual model for telephone survey cooperation, drawing on existing research regarding survey non-response. This is evaluated through reflections on non-response to a telephone survey of 1,900 Chinese senior and middle managers working in privately owned high-technology firms.

Findings – We conclude with a framework for cooperation in cross-cultural telephone surveys, enhancing the leverage-saliency theory. Among many factors, home country interviewers are crucial in gaining access and generating survey interview responses. However, they require careful recruitment, rigorous training and monitoring to help ensure the quality of research data.

Research implications – Our framework provides practical advice in minimising non-response in cross-cultural telephone surveys. This includes sample selection, the development of the survey instrument (and translation), reasons for refusal, research incentives and the role of interviewers.

Originality/value – Our contribution in this chapter is twofold: an enhanced understanding of leverage-saliency theory in cross-cultural telephone surveys, and an articulation of the role of interviewers in changing the dynamics of positive and negative leverage through telephone interaction with managers.

Details

West Meets East: Toward Methodological Exchange
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-026-0

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000